Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

National Post

postarcadenp:

Good news everyone! China suspends 14-year-old video game console ban, paving way for Sony, Microsoft
http://bit.ly/1gHNcWJ
BEIJING — China has temporarily lifted a 14-year-old ban on selling video game consoles, paving the way for Sony Corp, Microsoft Corp and Nintendo Co Ltd to enter the world’s third largest video game market in terms of revenue.
China saw video game revenues grow by more than a third in 2012 to nearly US$14 billion last year, but console makers are likely to face an uphill battle for market share in a country where a whole generation has grown up without a PlayStation, Xbox or Wii and where free PC and mobile games dominate.
The absence of consoles has left PC games with almost two-thirds of the market, according to data released at the annual China games industry conference in December. Browser gaming accounted for just over 15% and mobile gaming was nearly 14%, the data also showed.
“If Sony and Microsoft want to expand in China they need to think of changing their business model, and study the success of Internet gaming market providers where games are free but they charge money from operating games,” said Roger Sheng, research director at tech research firm Gartner.

postarcadenp:

Good news everyone! China suspends 14-year-old video game console ban, paving way for Sony, Microsoft

http://bit.ly/1gHNcWJ

BEIJING — China has temporarily lifted a 14-year-old ban on selling video game consoles, paving the way for Sony Corp, Microsoft Corp and Nintendo Co Ltd to enter the world’s third largest video game market in terms of revenue.

China saw video game revenues grow by more than a third in 2012 to nearly US$14 billion last year, but console makers are likely to face an uphill battle for market share in a country where a whole generation has grown up without a PlayStation, Xbox or Wii and where free PC and mobile games dominate.

The absence of consoles has left PC games with almost two-thirds of the market, according to data released at the annual China games industry conference in December. Browser gaming accounted for just over 15% and mobile gaming was nearly 14%, the data also showed.

“If Sony and Microsoft want to expand in China they need to think of changing their business model, and study the success of Internet gaming market providers where games are free but they charge money from operating games,” said Roger Sheng, research director at tech research firm Gartner.

Tagged with:  #news  #video games  #gaming  #tech  #technology  #China
postarcadenp:

Austin Grossman’s ‘You’ is the first true piece of fiction literature about the game design world
By Chad Sapieha
http://bit.ly/1gI1Xc1
A dearth of game releases over the holidays combined with a days-long lack of electricity (gee thanks, Toronto ice storm) gave me a chance to put aside my controllers and catch up on some reading, and the first book I picked up was Austin Grossman’s You.
Author of the terrific superhero send-up Soon I Will Be Invincible, Grossman’s first calling was game design. He has two decades of experience working on high profile games, from 1994′s classic System Shock through the paradigm-shifting Deus Ex and all the way up to 2012′s critically acclaimed Dishonored.
It’s from this impressive well of experience that he drew to create what I suspect may be the first piece of real literature that deeply plumbs the profession of game design in the way so many memorable works of fiction have explored other creative industries, including music, film, and art.
Grossman chose as his setting the heady game design days of the mid-to-late 1990s, when designers like John Carmack and Warren Spector were viewed as game making gods, polygonal graphics were experiencing huge leaps forward with almost every new release, and the world was starting to view games as something more than just kids entertainment, both in terms of their potential as a medium for artistic expression and as big business.

postarcadenp:

Austin Grossman’s ‘You’ is the first true piece of fiction literature about the game design world

By Chad Sapieha

http://bit.ly/1gI1Xc1

A dearth of game releases over the holidays combined with a days-long lack of electricity (gee thanks, Toronto ice storm) gave me a chance to put aside my controllers and catch up on some reading, and the first book I picked up was Austin Grossman’s You.

Author of the terrific superhero send-up Soon I Will Be Invincible, Grossman’s first calling was game design. He has two decades of experience working on high profile games, from 1994′s classic System Shock through the paradigm-shifting Deus Ex and all the way up to 2012′s critically acclaimed Dishonored.

It’s from this impressive well of experience that he drew to create what I suspect may be the first piece of real literature that deeply plumbs the profession of game design in the way so many memorable works of fiction have explored other creative industries, including music, film, and art.

Grossman chose as his setting the heady game design days of the mid-to-late 1990s, when designers like John Carmack and Warren Spector were viewed as game making gods, polygonal graphics were experiencing huge leaps forward with almost every new release, and the world was starting to view games as something more than just kids entertainment, both in terms of their potential as a medium for artistic expression and as big business.

postarcadenp:

Sony’s Playstation Now will stream old games to consoles, mobile devices starting next summer
By Matthew Braga
http://bit.ly/1gHHZ13
Sony Corp. unveiled the full extent of its game streaming plans at CES, the world’s largest tech show, in Las Vegas on Tuesday, after hinting that it would stream previous generation games to its new PlayStation 4.
Few details were provided about the service, which is called PlayStation Now, except that players can rent games individually, or pay a subscription fee for access to a wider range of titles.
However, the service won’t just be limited to the PlayStation 4. Andrew House, president and CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., revealed during a press conference that televisions, tablets, smartphones, as well as Sony’s PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita game consoles would have access as well.

postarcadenp:

Sony’s Playstation Now will stream old games to consoles, mobile devices starting next summer

By Matthew Braga

http://bit.ly/1gHHZ13

Sony Corp. unveiled the full extent of its game streaming plans at CES, the world’s largest tech show, in Las Vegas on Tuesday, after hinting that it would stream previous generation games to its new PlayStation 4.

Few details were provided about the service, which is called PlayStation Now, except that players can rent games individually, or pay a subscription fee for access to a wider range of titles.

However, the service won’t just be limited to the PlayStation 4. Andrew House, president and CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., revealed during a press conference that televisions, tablets, smartphones, as well as Sony’s PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita game consoles would have access as well.

postarcadenp:

Valve announces Steam Machines, starting at US$499, will go on sale this year
Will you be buying one?
http://bit.ly/19Q4bH9

postarcadenp:

Valve announces Steam Machines, starting at US$499, will go on sale this year

Will you be buying one?

http://bit.ly/19Q4bH9

postarcadenp:

Chad Sapieha gave us the Post Arcade Top 10 Games of 2013 last week. But Daniel Kaszor had different ideas …

So today, we present the REAL Top 10 games of 2013. 
http://bit.ly/1f8CWtm

postarcadenp:

Happy New Year!

Before you start dreaming about all the gaming goodness on tap for 2014, it’s time for one last look back at the best there was in 2013. We humbly present, the Post Arcade Top 10 games of 2013:

http://bit.ly/1hY6Uhh

postarcadenp:

Ubisoft game makers talk Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag – Freedom Cry

By Chad Sapieha

http://bit.ly/1dihRXA

Ubisoft Montreal’s epic historical adventure Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag is so massive most players haven’t even finished it yet. Indeed, some never will.

But that’s not stopping the French publisher from launching Freedom Cry, a major add-on that offers players a completely new story helmed by a brand new assassin: The physically daunting Adewale.

You know Adewale as Edward Kenway’s first mate, the man with whom the Black Flaghero forged a bond while escaping a slave ship. Freedom Cry casts him as the captain of his own ship; an assassin on a mission, and a man with decidedly little love for the slave trade.

Post Arcade had a chance to chat with Jill Murray, Freedom Cry‘s director of narrative design, and Hugo Giard, the add-on pack’s mission director.

Ms. Murray was a writer of young adult novels before signing on with Ubisoft Montreal, where she won a Writer’s Guild Award for her work on Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation for the PlayStation Vita. She’s currently hard at work on a top secret project that has yet to be announced.

Mr. Giard, meanwhile has worked on several narrative-driven Ubisoft games and add-on packs, from Rainbow 6: Critical Hour to Assassin’s Creed III: The Tyranny of King Washington.

Here, the two Assassin’s Creed vets talk about the character of Adewale and how his background as a man born into slavery has informed his motivations and abilities.

Click through for the whole interview…

postarcadenp:

Still not sure what to get that kid on your Xmas shopping list? Don’t worry, Chad Sapieha and his daughter run down the 10 best kid-friendly games of 2013. 

http://bit.ly/1fh2uQP

My daughter’s finger is on the pulse of her generation. At least when it comes to video games.

And I like to think I know a little something about what parents want to see their kids playing (and maybe even play themselves).

Together, she and I have sussed out 10 family friendly games released this year that are pretty much guaranteed to be sure-fire hits for their target audiences. And we’ve each provided reasons to back up our claims.

The result is basically a can’t-fail gift guide for anyone with kid gamers on their Christmas shopping lists.

Check them out…

postarcadenp:

Just got an Xbox One? Wondering which launch games to pick up? Our own Chad Sapieha runs down which launch games to get, and which to avoid. 

http://bit.ly/19fd6iT

postarcadenp:

Tiny Brains Review: An excellent co-op experience, but you might hate your friends after
By Daniel Kaszor
http://bit.ly/1eXcyiA
Tiny Brains is the kind of game that will make you hate your friends in the best kind of way.
The indie co-operative puzzle game, developed by Montreal-based Spearhead Games, tasks you and your friends with solving a series of nefarious puzzles together. The gist of the story is that you are one of four super-powered lab animals who are now charged with escaping through a series of tests and challenges where each of you must use your unique abilities together. One animal can blow objects away, one animal can suck them closer, another can make blocks of ice and a fourth can swap places with things.
While the game can be played solo (you can swap to any character not controlled by another player), the game works best when you’re with three of your chums, solving things together. The puzzles are all designed around each character’s non-symmetrical abilities. For example, to get over a gap, one player needs to create a block of ice and another player needs to blow that block of ice across the chasm while the first character rides it.
The entire game consists of challenges like this, designed to make you work together and use your skills to solve all assortments of tricks and traps.

postarcadenp:

Tiny Brains Review: An excellent co-op experience, but you might hate your friends after

By Daniel Kaszor

http://bit.ly/1eXcyiA

Tiny Brains is the kind of game that will make you hate your friends in the best kind of way.

The indie co-operative puzzle game, developed by Montreal-based Spearhead Games, tasks you and your friends with solving a series of nefarious puzzles together. The gist of the story is that you are one of four super-powered lab animals who are now charged with escaping through a series of tests and challenges where each of you must use your unique abilities together. One animal can blow objects away, one animal can suck them closer, another can make blocks of ice and a fourth can swap places with things.

While the game can be played solo (you can swap to any character not controlled by another player), the game works best when you’re with three of your chums, solving things together. The puzzles are all designed around each character’s non-symmetrical abilities. For example, to get over a gap, one player needs to create a block of ice and another player needs to blow that block of ice across the chasm while the first character rides it.

The entire game consists of challenges like this, designed to make you work together and use your skills to solve all assortments of tricks and traps.

Tagged with:  #gaming  #video games  #Tiny Brains

postarcadenp:

Mario & Sonic’s Sochi 2014 adventure is a muddled mess

By Chad Sapieha

http://bit.ly/1eXaGX0

As I slipped Mario and Sonic at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games into my Wii U I thought: Two awesome game icons doing a little curling and getting into snowball fights? What’s not to like?

But now that I’ve played through the game’s 24 events scattered across a handful of modes, I’m honestly wondering whether there’s anything about it that I really and truly enjoyed.

This is a deeply middling cartoon simulation of the snowier Olympic Games, with events that range from competent but unexciting, to others that are confusing and border on frustrating. It looks great, and you’ll get to take control of loads of loveable characters, but broad-smiling fun is as elusive as Jamaican bobsledding gold.

postarcadenp:

Canadians covet Sony’s PlayStation 4 over Microsoft’s Xbox One: IDC
By Matthew Braga
http://bit.ly/1cX0fAE
As the battle for supremacy among next generation game consoles kicks into high gear, holiday shoppers in Canada appear to be more interested in purchasing Sony’s new PlayStation 4 than Microsoft’s competing Xbox One, according to new IDC Canada research published today.
Roughly 6% of Canadians sampled say they “definitely” plan to buy a PlayStation 4 for Christmas, according to Krista Napier, the firm’s research manager for mobility & consumer products, versus 4% who said they plan on buying the the Xbox One.
However, that gap is much larger among males aged 18-29, with 13% “definitely” planning to buy a PlayStation, while only 3% have put the Xbox One on their shopping lists…

postarcadenp:

Canadians covet Sony’s PlayStation 4 over Microsoft’s Xbox One: IDC

By Matthew Braga

http://bit.ly/1cX0fAE

As the battle for supremacy among next generation game consoles kicks into high gear, holiday shoppers in Canada appear to be more interested in purchasing Sony’s new PlayStation 4 than Microsoft’s competing Xbox One, according to new IDC Canada research published today.

Roughly 6% of Canadians sampled say they “definitely” plan to buy a PlayStation 4 for Christmas, according to Krista Napier, the firm’s research manager for mobility & consumer products, versus 4% who said they plan on buying the the Xbox One.

However, that gap is much larger among males aged 18-29, with 13% “definitely” planning to buy a PlayStation, while only 3% have put the Xbox One on their shopping lists…

postarcadenp:

Forger the PS4 and Xbox One … Why Nintendo’s Wii U and 3DS may be your best bets this holiday

By Chad Sapieha

http://bit.ly/1cWWn2z

My colleague Daniel Kaszor and I wrote earlier this week on why Xbox One andPlayStation 4 may have each claimed victory in the opening volleys of the next-gen war.

Conspicuously absent from our arguments was any discussion of Nintendo’s Wii U.

Let’s fix that.

Released just over a year ago, the Wii U, too, is an 8thgeneration video game system, even if its hardware isn’t a match for Sony and Microsoft’s new powerhouses.

And, truth be told, I’m fielding as many questions from family and friends — as well as acquaintances, folks on social media, and readers — about whether Wii U is worth buying this holiday as I am about Xbox One and PlayStation 4 combined.

Here’s what I tell them:

It no longer does any good to place Nintendo’s consoles in the same category as Xbox or PlayStation. Starting with the Wii – perhaps going back even further – it’s now readily apparent that Nintendo is intent on forging its own path in the video game industry.

This is evident not just in the Japanese game giant’s hardware, which has become curiously out of step with that of other manufacturers in terms of processing power and interface design, but also — perhaps even especially — in the way it approaches content.

postarcadenp:

Chad Sapieha says the PS4 won the next-gen console launch

http://bit.ly/1chzHf7

But Daniel Kaszor says the Xbox One is the real winner

http://bit.ly/1chzzMN

Who do you believe?

postarcadenp:

The horror, the horror… Eldritch’s Lovecraftian nightmare
By Matthew O’Mara
http://bit.ly/1dBwlXF
With two out of the three orbs finally on their pedestals, it felt like the finish line was near.
Slowly going through each Lovecraft-inspired world in Eldritch, developed by Minor Key Games, requires plotting, planning, and sneaking to find that mystical goal.
As a roguelike, the game’s levels constantly reorganize themselves and death results in losing everything. Every bullet, every artefact, every orb… staying alive is pretty much a player’s only objective.
With each orb you find, a new world opens. With each world you find, an untold number of horrors await from the Deep Ones to Insane Cultists. When those dark tomes that hold these prisons swing open, survival becomes your number one goal.
The third book’s green-tinted world opens up and the survival instincts kick in.

postarcadenp:

The horror, the horror… Eldritch’s Lovecraftian nightmare

By Matthew O’Mara

http://bit.ly/1dBwlXF

With two out of the three orbs finally on their pedestals, it felt like the finish line was near.

Slowly going through each Lovecraft-inspired world in Eldritch, developed by Minor Key Games, requires plotting, planning, and sneaking to find that mystical goal.

As a roguelike, the game’s levels constantly reorganize themselves and death results in losing everything. Every bullet, every artefact, every orb… staying alive is pretty much a player’s only objective.

With each orb you find, a new world opens. With each world you find, an untold number of horrors await from the Deep Ones to Insane Cultists. When those dark tomes that hold these prisons swing open, survival becomes your number one goal.

The third book’s green-tinted world opens up and the survival instincts kick in.

Tagged with:  #Eldritch  #Lovecraft  #gaming  #video games