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National Post

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Shakespeare’s theatre — Audience members watch a production of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ in Shakespeare’s Globe theatre on the Southbank of the River Thames on July 16, 2013 in London, England. (Photos by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

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CATS on cats

After 25 years away from Toronto stages, Andrew Lloyd Webber’s blockbuster Cats returns for a new generation. But cats occupy a very different place in our culture than they did during the show’s first run. Thanks mostly to an Internet culture that prizes documenting everything and staying cloistered indoors, cats have become the true stars of new media, with their habits, quirks and even rich emotional lives documented from literally every angle. In an attempt to bring together these pre- and post-millennium views of cats, the National Post’s David Berry met a few of the cast members of Cats in the green room and watched a selection of cat videos. It turns out that even Cats can’t resist cat videos: natpo.st/10qtASz

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In ogre his head: Going green with the star of Shrek

It ain’t easy being green, especially when you’re an ogre whose swamp has become the official campsite for a host of unwanted fairy tale creatures. Harder still? When you’re the title actor behind the North American tour of Shrek the Musical. As everyone’s favourite Scottish-accented beast, Lucas Poost has to sit and squirm through an hour-long makeup process to bring out the ogre within.

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Theatre review: War Horse gallops off to victory
The transforming moment in War Horse — transforming in every sense — comes about 20 minutes in. Joey, the title horse, changes before our eyes from foal to full-grown stallion. It would be unfair to reveal exactly how, but up until this point Joey has been a life-size skeletal puppet, visibly manipulated by three performers whom it is sometimes confusingly easy to mistake for characters in the story; stable hands perhaps?

The puppeteers are still in evidence when Joey grows up, but they’re now so disposed that we can tune them out. For the rest of the evening we believe in Joey as an actual horse, even while remaining happily aware that he’s a product of theatrical wizardry. The magic is manifold. The technical peak coincides with an emotional peak. And that synergy, of spectacle and feeling, keeps going throughout the show.

Head or tail: Giving life to the War Horse
When audiences see Joey full-grown for the first time, galloping to the front of the stage, its paper mane and tail flapping like streamers, they applaud like children at a circus. These horses neigh and nuzzle. They rear and fall.

Theatregoers are witnessing a magic trick, a feat of the imagination. For when the two people controlling the horse from the inside and the one manipulating its head are in synch, the puppeteers disappear. However, when they are not connected, when there is a misstep, a break in the rhythm, the audience very quickly sees three grown men trying to operate an equine skeleton. (Photos: Courtesy of Mirvish)

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Canon Theatre renamed in honour of Ed Mirvish
A video clip shows Ed Mirvish looking directly into a camera and  speaking to his audiences: “Twenty-eight years ago, I was a storekeeper.  Today, I’m still a storekeeper but also the owner of this very  beautiful theatre.”
Filmed in the early 1960s, he is standing in the Royal Alexandra  Theatre. “That’s the world we live in. We never know when we start,  where we will finish. But at this point, I feel very happy and  privileged to be a part of this theatre.”
If Mirvish were alive today, he might have similar words for the  Canon Theatre, which on Tuesday was renamed the Ed Mirvish Theatre in  his honour.

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Canon Theatre renamed in honour of Ed Mirvish

A video clip shows Ed Mirvish looking directly into a camera and speaking to his audiences: “Twenty-eight years ago, I was a storekeeper. Today, I’m still a storekeeper but also the owner of this very beautiful theatre.”

Filmed in the early 1960s, he is standing in the Royal Alexandra Theatre. “That’s the world we live in. We never know when we start, where we will finish. But at this point, I feel very happy and privileged to be a part of this theatre.”

If Mirvish were alive today, he might have similar words for the Canon Theatre, which on Tuesday was renamed the Ed Mirvish Theatre in his honour.

The Man in the Mirror: Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson show a labour of love Michael Jackson would have loved this, says Greg Phillinganes, the late singer’s long-time music director.Phillinganes is sitting on the stage at Montreal’s Bell Centre where Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson: The Immortal World Tour debuted to 15,000 spectators this past weekend, including Jackson’s mother, his three children and three of his brothers. Around Phillinganes, the crew is setting up for another show. On the floor, a contortionist practices handstands on a gigantic book.“He loved Cirque,” Phillinganes says about Jackson, who died in Los Angeles in June 2009. “He has seen all of their shows, at least twice, brought the kids, met the Cirque brass, visited headquarters — and when he did, they couldn’t pull him out of the costume wing.” (Photo: Cirque du Soleil)Related:Inside Cirque du Soleil’s Montreal headquarters

The Man in the Mirror: Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson show a labour of love
Michael Jackson would have loved this, says Greg Phillinganes, the late singer’s long-time music director.

Phillinganes is sitting on the stage at Montreal’s Bell Centre where Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson: The Immortal World Tour debuted to 15,000 spectators this past weekend, including Jackson’s mother, his three children and three of his brothers. Around Phillinganes, the crew is setting up for another show. On the floor, a contortionist practices handstands on a gigantic book.

“He loved Cirque,” Phillinganes says about Jackson, who died in Los Angeles in June 2009. “He has seen all of their shows, at least twice, brought the kids, met the Cirque brass, visited headquarters — and when he did, they couldn’t pull him out of the costume wing.” (Photo: Cirque du Soleil)

Related:
Inside Cirque du Soleil’s Montreal headquarters

Justin Bieber wanted for Les Misérables roleToronto theatre producer Cameron Mackintosh is offering a role in his revamped production of Les Misérables to Canadian pop star Justin Bieber.The Mirvish production, which is based on the eponymous Victor Hugo novel and a musical — first mounted in 1985 by the Barbican Center in London — by Claude Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil, follows a group of characters during the French Revolution. (Lee Celano/Reuters)

Justin Bieber wanted for Les Misérables role
Toronto theatre producer Cameron Mackintosh is offering a role in his revamped production of Les Misérables to Canadian pop star Justin Bieber.

The Mirvish production, which is based on the eponymous Victor Hugo novel and a musical — first mounted in 1985 by the Barbican Center in London — by Claude Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil, follows a group of characters during the French Revolution. (Lee Celano/Reuters)