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New One World Trade Centre so bland it ‘looks like something they made in Canada’: British street artist Banksy
In conveying the apparent blandness of One World Trade Center, the 541-metre skyscraper built to replace New York City’s destroyed Twin Towers, British street artist Banksy on Sunday equated the structure to something from Canada.
“That building is a disaster. Well no, disasters are interesting. One World Trade Center is a non-event. It’s vanilla. It looks like something they would build in Canada.” (Photo: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

New One World Trade Centre so bland it ‘looks like something they made in Canada’: British street artist Banksy

In conveying the apparent blandness of One World Trade Center, the 541-metre skyscraper built to replace New York City’s destroyed Twin Towers, British street artist Banksy on Sunday equated the structure to something from Canada.

“That building is a disaster. Well no, disasters are interesting. One World Trade Center is a non-event. It’s vanilla. It looks like something they would build in Canada.” (Photo: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Tower Infinity in South Korea to be the world’s first invisible skyscraper

There’s no construction date yet for the planned 1,476-foot tower, called Tower Infinity. But its architects have just been granted a construction permit to begin building outside of Seoul, South Korea near Incheon International Airport.

The visionaries behind the project, GDS Architects, will make the tower appear “invisible” using an LED facade system with optical cameras to display what’s directly behind the building. When turned on, the “reflective skin” of the building will give the illusion that Tower Infinity is blending in with the skyline. (Photos: GDS Architects)

London skyscraper’s ‘deathray’ reflection is melting cars, burning businesses, but also cooking eggs
London’s skyline has a new addition this week: the Walkie Scorchie. Joining the crowded group of glass protrusions, such as the Shard, the Gherkin, and the Cheesegrater, is 20 Fenchurch Street, which had previously been known as the Walkie Talkie, on account of it looking vaguely like a gigantic two-way radio.
But the 37-storey office block, due to be completed next year, has gained a new sinister reputation: the death ray, the fryscraper, the Walkie Scorchie.
Its south-facing concave facade conspires to concentrate and reflect the sun’s rays into an intense beam of shimmery light, hitting the buildings on the opposite side of the road. Along a 30-yard stretch of pavement at Eastcheap – just a Molotov cocktail’s throw from where the Great Fire of 1666 started -London’s burning.
Yesterday afternoon, I was sent out to see if I could fry an egg in the heat, a task that I presumed was impossible on an overcast September day. But, not only was it possible, I had to run out of the death ray that was slowly cooking my egg, because the thinning hairs on my head started to catch fire. The distinctive smell of burning follicles, combined with the sensation of a magnifying glass being shone on my pate, forced me to take cover along the road. (Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

London skyscraper’s ‘deathray’ reflection is melting cars, burning businesses, but also cooking eggs

London’s skyline has a new addition this week: the Walkie Scorchie. Joining the crowded group of glass protrusions, such as the Shard, the Gherkin, and the Cheesegrater, is 20 Fenchurch Street, which had previously been known as the Walkie Talkie, on account of it looking vaguely like a gigantic two-way radio.

But the 37-storey office block, due to be completed next year, has gained a new sinister reputation: the death ray, the fryscraper, the Walkie Scorchie.

Its south-facing concave facade conspires to concentrate and reflect the sun’s rays into an intense beam of shimmery light, hitting the buildings on the opposite side of the road. Along a 30-yard stretch of pavement at Eastcheap – just a Molotov cocktail’s throw from where the Great Fire of 1666 started -London’s burning.

Yesterday afternoon, I was sent out to see if I could fry an egg in the heat, a task that I presumed was impossible on an overcast September day. But, not only was it possible, I had to run out of the death ray that was slowly cooking my egg, because the thinning hairs on my head started to catch fire. The distinctive smell of burning follicles, combined with the sensation of a magnifying glass being shone on my pate, forced me to take cover along the road. (Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

New skyscraper in London’s financial district is casting light beams so intense it’s melting parked carsThe owners of the 37-story tower known as the Walkie Talkie in the City of London financial district are investigating a light beam cast by the building that’s so intense it melted parked cars.City AM reported that Martin Lindsay parked his Jaguar XJ below the building and an hour later there was a smell of burning plastic and some panels were warped beyond repair.City AM’s reported that temperatures in the bright spot hit 70 celsius, which is 158 Fahrenheit. (Getty Images)

New skyscraper in London’s financial district is casting light beams so intense it’s melting parked cars
The owners of the 37-story tower known as the Walkie Talkie in the City of London financial district are investigating a light beam cast by the building that’s so intense it melted parked cars.

City AM reported that Martin Lindsay parked his Jaguar XJ below the building and an hour later there was a smell of burning plastic and some panels were warped beyond repair.

City AM’s reported that temperatures in the bright spot hit 70 celsius, which is 158 Fahrenheit. (Getty Images)

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Above the world in 90 days: China building world’s tallest skyscraper — 220 storeys — in just three months
When Pierre Beaudet was told about a Chinese corporation’s plans to build the world’s tallest building in record speed — 2,479 soaring feet in just 90 days — the global studies professor marvelled Thursday: “Ah. There’s nothing they can’t do.”

Having already revolutionized construction by literally stacking factory-made modules like Lego blocks, Broad Sustainable Building Corporation is sending the world a message — not just about itself, but also about its home country: Make no mistake, China is an epicentre of technological progress and a nation worthy of awe.

“It’s a symbol of their new superiority,” said Takashi Fujitani, the director of Asia Pacific studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs’ Asian Institute in Toronto. “Modernity today is really about speed in a lot of ways, so being at the top of the world is about being able to do things fast.” (Broad Construction)