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National Post

Half-kilometre long Kim Jong-un propaganda message visible from spaceNorth Korea’ Kim Jong-un is now extolled in a propaganda message that can be seen from space.The message built in the Ryanggang Province, according to the BBC, reads ”Long Live General Kim Jong-un, the Shining Sun!” and is more than half a kilometre long. Each letter is about the size of a small building. (Google Earth)

Half-kilometre long Kim Jong-un propaganda message visible from space
North Korea’ Kim Jong-un is now extolled in a propaganda message that can be seen from space.

The message built in the Ryanggang Province, according to the BBC, reads ”Long Live General Kim Jong-un, the Shining Sun!” and is more than half a kilometre long. Each letter is about the size of a small building. (Google Earth)

The altered reality of Kim Jong-Il’s Photoshop funeralAs Kim Jong-Il’s funeral convoy moved slowly through the streets lined up by mourners, a view overhead revealed eerily symmetrical crowds lining up the path of the procession. It was a well-orchestrated event for a picture-perfect funeral. But, how picture-perfect exactly was it? (Photos: Kyodo News (left), KNS (right))

The altered reality of Kim Jong-Il’s Photoshop funeral
As Kim Jong-Il’s funeral convoy moved slowly through the streets lined up by mourners, a view overhead revealed eerily symmetrical crowds lining up the path of the procession. It was a well-orchestrated event for a picture-perfect funeral. But, how picture-perfect exactly was it? (Photos: Kyodo News (left), KNS (right))

nparts:

As North Koreans poured into the streets Monday to mourn the death of leader Kim Jong-il at age 69, there’s no better time to examine the role propaganda art played in the country’s all-embracing personality cult. The portrait featured here was part of Flowers of Kim Il-sung, a controversial 2010 exhibit in Vienna that featured 16 artworks starring Kim and his father, the “Eternal President,” who passed away in 1994.

nparts:

As North Koreans poured into the streets Monday to mourn the death of leader Kim Jong-il at age 69, there’s no better time to examine the role propaganda art played in the country’s all-embracing personality cult. The portrait featured here was part of Flowers of Kim Il-sung, a controversial 2010 exhibit in Vienna that featured 16 artworks starring Kim and his father, the “Eternal President,” who passed away in 1994.

China’s birthday flick is hottest propaganda in townChina is going all out to make the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party a red-letter day. In the process it is undertaking a massive propaganda campaign the country hasn’t seen since the Cultural Revolution.In the days before and after July 1, the Chinese people are being urged over and over again “to love the Party, love the nation, and love socialism.”The country’s propaganda czar, Li Changchun, recently ordered the official state media to create “a dense atmosphere of solemnity and ardour, joy and peace, unity and advancement and scientific development.”The centrepiece of the propaganda blitz is a two hour feature film, Jian Dang Wei Ye (The Founding of the Party), which has just been released internationally with the English title Beginning of the Great Revival.

China’s birthday flick is hottest propaganda in town
China is going all out to make the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party a red-letter day. In the process it is undertaking a massive propaganda campaign the country hasn’t seen since the Cultural Revolution.

In the days before and after July 1, the Chinese people are being urged over and over again “to love the Party, love the nation, and love socialism.”

The country’s propaganda czar, Li Changchun, recently ordered the official state media to create “a dense atmosphere of solemnity and ardour, joy and peace, unity and advancement and scientific development.”

The centrepiece of the propaganda blitz is a two hour feature film, Jian Dang Wei Ye (The Founding of the Party), which has just been released internationally with the English title Beginning of the Great Revival.

Robert Fulford: Totalitarian Art and the dictator’s creative liberties Joseph Stalin, a stout, bandy-legged fellow with bad skin, looked like a rather handsome devil in the official paintings and statues that spread his fame across the Soviet empire from the 1930s to the 1950s. Those commissioned products of official art, depicted in Igor Golomstock’s recent Totalitarian Art (Overlook Press) and in the European parks that show propaganda sculpture as public amusement, are slowly turning the tragedies of communism and fascism into an abrasively funny satire on 20th-century history.Portraits of Stalin, Mao, Hitler and many lesser despots, when seen at a safe distance in time, amount to a crude visual definition of irony: They state something that everyone knows to be false. Official art says clearly that all dictators are noble and all their subjects are satisfied. The Soviet and German masses are made to appear dedicated, the Chinese happy.The tyrants differ slightly. In each country, the artists developed a characteristic mood for the leader, presumably at his direction. In Totalitarian Art Stalin usually looks serene, Hitler fierce, Mao jolly. (Photo: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters)

Robert Fulford: Totalitarian Art and the dictator’s creative liberties
Joseph Stalin, a stout, bandy-legged fellow with bad skin, looked like a rather handsome devil in the official paintings and statues that spread his fame across the Soviet empire from the 1930s to the 1950s. Those commissioned products of official art, depicted in Igor Golomstock’s recent Totalitarian Art (Overlook Press) and in the European parks that show propaganda sculpture as public amusement, are slowly turning the tragedies of communism and fascism into an abrasively funny satire on 20th-century history.

Portraits of Stalin, Mao, Hitler and many lesser despots, when seen at a safe distance in time, amount to a crude visual definition of irony: They state something that everyone knows to be false. Official art says clearly that all dictators are noble and all their subjects are satisfied. The Soviet and German masses are made to appear dedicated, the Chinese happy.

The tyrants differ slightly. In each country, the artists developed a characteristic mood for the leader, presumably at his direction. In Totalitarian Art Stalin usually looks serene, Hitler fierce, Mao jolly. (Photo: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters)