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‘Significant concerns’: Canada’s privacy watchdog launches probe into sweeping U.S. spy programsCanada’s privacy watchdog, expressing “significant concerns” about reports Canadians may have had their global telephone and Internet use monitored by spy agencies without their knowledge, will be digging for more information.The world learned last week that the U.S. government had been conducting a secret surveillance program, called Prism, that collected telephone records as well as electronic communications such as emails and documents between individuals around the world.‘Significant revelations’ coming soon from NSA leaks: Journalist who broke the storyThe journalist who exposed classified U.S. surveillance programs leaked by an American defence contractor said Tuesday that there will be more “significant revelations” to come from the documents.“We are going to have a lot more significant revelations that have not yet been heard over the next several weeks and months,” said Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian.Greenwald told The Associated Press the decision was being made on when to release the next story based on the information provided by Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old employee of government contractor Booz Allen Hamilton who has been accused by U.S. Senate intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California of committing an “act of treason” that should be prosecuted.

‘Significant concerns’: Canada’s privacy watchdog launches probe into sweeping U.S. spy programs
Canada’s privacy watchdog, expressing “significant concerns” about reports Canadians may have had their global telephone and Internet use monitored by spy agencies without their knowledge, will be digging for more information.

The world learned last week that the U.S. government had been conducting a secret surveillance program, called Prism, that collected telephone records as well as electronic communications such as emails and documents between individuals around the world.


‘Significant revelations’ coming soon from NSA leaks: Journalist who broke the story
The journalist who exposed classified U.S. surveillance programs leaked by an American defence contractor said Tuesday that there will be more “significant revelations” to come from the documents.

“We are going to have a lot more significant revelations that have not yet been heard over the next several weeks and months,” said Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian.

Greenwald told The Associated Press the decision was being made on when to release the next story based on the information provided by Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old employee of government contractor Booz Allen Hamilton who has been accused by U.S. Senate intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California of committing an “act of treason” that should be prosecuted.

We are all Big Brother: Surveillance has become a social media pastime that is both ‘intensive’ and ‘routine’When accused London beheader Michael Adebolajo, now calling himself Mujahid Abu Hamza, justified the killing of Drummer Lee Rigby to an eyewitness, he addressed an entire society via a cellphone camera.“You people will never be safe. Remove your governments,” he said.At the Boston Marathon, the Tsarnaev brothers did not seek such attention, but it found them anyway, in amateur photos as well as security-cameras. And as with Vancouver’s Stanley Cup riots and Toronto’s G20 vandalism, Boston authorities appealed to the public for the surveillance value of their photos.Making sense of this stylistic shift in surveillance, from top-down secret observation by authorities to “lateral surveillance” of the people by the people, requires a refreshed perspective, according to David Lyon, professor of sociology and director of the Surveillance Studies Centre at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont.In a plenary lecture for this week’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Victoria — known as the Learneds — he calls it the shift from “fear” to “fun,” from surveillance as a security tool to a social media pastime. (John Moore/Getty Images)

We are all Big Brother: Surveillance has become a social media pastime that is both ‘intensive’ and ‘routine’
When accused London beheader Michael Adebolajo, now calling himself Mujahid Abu Hamza, justified the killing of Drummer Lee Rigby to an eyewitness, he addressed an entire society via a cellphone camera.

“You people will never be safe. Remove your governments,” he said.

At the Boston Marathon, the Tsarnaev brothers did not seek such attention, but it found them anyway, in amateur photos as well as security-cameras. And as with Vancouver’s Stanley Cup riots and Toronto’s G20 vandalism, Boston authorities appealed to the public for the surveillance value of their photos.

Making sense of this stylistic shift in surveillance, from top-down secret observation by authorities to “lateral surveillance” of the people by the people, requires a refreshed perspective, according to David Lyon, professor of sociology and director of the Surveillance Studies Centre at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont.

In a plenary lecture for this week’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Victoria — known as the Learneds — he calls it the shift from “fear” to “fun,” from surveillance as a security tool to a social media pastime. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Police can look through a password-less phone without a warrant, says courtOntario’s highest court has signalled that the right of police officers to look through someone’s phone depends on whether there’s a password.The Court of Appeal for Ontario says it’s all right for police to have a cursory look through the phone upon arrest if it’s not password protected, but if it is, investigators should get a search warrant.The court’s ruling comes in the case of a man who appealed his robbery conviction, arguing that police breached his charter rights by looking through his phone after his arrest. (Fotolia)

Police can look through a password-less phone without a warrant, says court
Ontario’s highest court has signalled that the right of police officers to look through someone’s phone depends on whether there’s a password.

The Court of Appeal for Ontario says it’s all right for police to have a cursory look through the phone upon arrest if it’s not password protected, but if it is, investigators should get a search warrant.

The court’s ruling comes in the case of a man who appealed his robbery conviction, arguing that police breached his charter rights by looking through his phone after his arrest. (Fotolia)

Tagged with:  #news  #technology  #privacy
Student expelled from Montreal college after finding ‘sloppy coding’ that compromised security of 250,000 students personal dataA student has been expelled from Montreal’s Dawson College after he discovered a flaw in the computer system used by most Quebec CEGEPs (General and Vocational Colleges), one which compromised the security of over 250,000 students’ personal information.Ahmed Al-Khabaz, a 20-year-old computer science student at Dawson and a member of the school’s software development club, was working on a mobile app to allow students easier access to their college account when he and a colleague discovered what he describes as “sloppy coding” in the widely used Omnivox software which would allow “anyone with a basic knowledge of computers to gain access to the personal information of any student in the system, including social insurance number, home address and phone number, class schedule, basically all the information the college has on a student.”“I saw a flaw which left the personal information of thousands of students, including myself, vulnerable,” said Mr. Al-Khabaz. “I felt I had a moral duty to bring it to the attention of the college and help to fix it, which I did. I could have easily hidden my identity behind a proxy. I chose not to because I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong.” (Image courtesy of safesolvent.com)

Student expelled from Montreal college after finding ‘sloppy coding’ that compromised security of 250,000 students personal data
A student has been expelled from Montreal’s Dawson College after he discovered a flaw in the computer system used by most Quebec CEGEPs (General and Vocational Colleges), one which compromised the security of over 250,000 students’ personal information.

Ahmed Al-Khabaz, a 20-year-old computer science student at Dawson and a member of the school’s software development club, was working on a mobile app to allow students easier access to their college account when he and a colleague discovered what he describes as “sloppy coding” in the widely used Omnivox software which would allow “anyone with a basic knowledge of computers to gain access to the personal information of any student in the system, including social insurance number, home address and phone number, class schedule, basically all the information the college has on a student.”

“I saw a flaw which left the personal information of thousands of students, including myself, vulnerable,” said Mr. Al-Khabaz. “I felt I had a moral duty to bring it to the attention of the college and help to fix it, which I did. I could have easily hidden my identity behind a proxy. I chose not to because I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong.” (Image courtesy of safesolvent.com)

‘Strip search’ body scanners to be removed from airports after company fails to make images less revealingAirport body scanners that privacy advocates have likened to strip searches are to be removed from U.S. airport because the company behind the machine couldn’t write software to make passenger images less revealing.Airline passengers were offended by the revealing images, including those of children and the elderly. The Washington- based Electronic Privacy Information Center sued the U.S. Transportation Security Administration in July 2010, claiming the scanners violated privacy laws and has called use of the machines equivalent to a “physically invasive strip search.”Under pressure from privacy advocates and some members of Congress, the TSA moved its screens to separate rooms away from airport security checkpoints. Officials monitoring the scanner images alert agents if they see a possible risk. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

‘Strip search’ body scanners to be removed from airports after company fails to make images less revealing
Airport body scanners that privacy advocates have likened to strip searches are to be removed from U.S. airport because the company behind the machine couldn’t write software to make passenger images less revealing.

Airline passengers were offended by the revealing images, including those of children and the elderly. The Washington- based Electronic Privacy Information Center sued the U.S. Transportation Security Administration in July 2010, claiming the scanners violated privacy laws and has called use of the machines equivalent to a “physically invasive strip search.”

Under pressure from privacy advocates and some members of Congress, the TSA moved its screens to separate rooms away from airport security checkpoints. Officials monitoring the scanner images alert agents if they see a possible risk. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #news  #travel  #TSA  #privacy
Instagram’s ‘suicide note’: Users furious over photo-sharing service’s privacy changesIn what photography fans are labeling a “suicide note,” Facebook’s Instagram photo-sharing service revealed a new privacy policy that states it may sell information and photos to advertisers without compensation or notification to users.The announcement was quickly met with anger, as users threaten to shut down their accounts and switch to other photo-sharing services like Flickr, while others used the hashtag #quitstagram.“To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you,” Instagram said in a blog post.The changes are set to take effect on January 16, 2013. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Instagram’s ‘suicide note’: Users furious over photo-sharing service’s privacy changes
In what photography fans are labeling a “suicide note,” Facebook’s Instagram photo-sharing service revealed a new privacy policy that states it may sell information and photos to advertisers without compensation or notification to users.

The announcement was quickly met with anger, as users threaten to shut down their accounts and switch to other photo-sharing services like Flickr, while others used the hashtag #quitstagram.

“To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you,” Instagram said in a blog post.

The changes are set to take effect on January 16, 2013. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Fake Facebook privacy notice circulates in response to proposed voting changeslatest privacy preoccupation to grip Facebook users appears to have been provoked by changes to the social media website’s data use policy made last week.Many users have been posting notices to their Facebook walls purporting to protect their copyright, stating in part, “In response to the new Facebook guidelines, I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, professional photos and videos etc.”However, what Facebook does with information or materials shared on its site is governed by its own data use policy, which users agree to when they sign up for the site. Simply posting a notice to your wall cannot alter those terms. (AP Photo/dapd, Joerg Koch, File)

Fake Facebook privacy notice circulates in response to proposed voting changes
latest privacy preoccupation to grip Facebook users appears to have been provoked by changes to the social media website’s data use policy made last week.

Many users have been posting notices to their Facebook walls purporting to protect their copyright, stating in part, “In response to the new Facebook guidelines, I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, professional photos and videos etc.”

However, what Facebook does with information or materials shared on its site is governed by its own data use policy, which users agree to when they sign up for the site. Simply posting a notice to your wall cannot alter those terms. (AP Photo/dapd, Joerg Koch, File)

Tagged with:  #news  #Facebook  #privacy
Bionic mannequins spy on shoppers to boost luxury salesStore mannequins are meant to catch your eye. Soon you may catch theirs. Benetton is among fashion brands deploying mannequins equipped with technology used to identify criminals at airports to watch over shoppers in their stores.Retailers are introducing the EyeSee to glean data on customers much as online merchants are able to do. The device has spurred shops to adjust window displays, store layouts and promotions to keep consumers walking in the door and spending. A camera embedded in one eye feeds data into facial-recognition software like that used by police. It logs the age, gender and race of passers-by. (Bloomberg)

Bionic mannequins spy on shoppers to boost luxury sales
Store mannequins are meant to catch your eye. Soon you may catch theirs. Benetton is among fashion brands deploying mannequins equipped with technology used to identify criminals at airports to watch over shoppers in their stores.

Retailers are introducing the EyeSee to glean data on customers much as online merchants are able to do. The device has spurred shops to adjust window displays, store layouts and promotions to keep consumers walking in the door and spending. A camera embedded in one eye feeds data into facial-recognition software like that used by police. It logs the age, gender and race of passers-by. (Bloomberg)

Tagged with:  #news  #shopping  #privacy  #mannequins  #EyeSee
‘Vikileaks’ Twitter account reveals embarrassing details of Vic Toews’ private lifeA Twitter account that reveals purported details of Safety Minister  Vic Toews’ messy divorce and his spending habits has popped up online.
The tweets are a blatant jab at the politician, who, along with the Conservative government, tabled  a bill in Parliament on Tuesday that would give authorities greater  access to citizens’ personal data online and beef up surveillance  measures.
 
The Opposition, as well as Canada’s privacy commissioner, have slammed bill C-30, calling it an unnecessary invasion of privacy.

‘Vikileaks’ Twitter account reveals embarrassing details of Vic Toews’ private life
A Twitter account that reveals purported details of Safety Minister Vic Toews’ messy divorce and his spending habits has popped up online.

The tweets are a blatant jab at the politician, who, along with the Conservative government, tabled a bill in Parliament on Tuesday that would give authorities greater access to citizens’ personal data online and beef up surveillance measures.

 

The Opposition, as well as Canada’s privacy commissioner, have slammed bill C-30, calling it an unnecessary invasion of privacy.

Is Google evil? Not reallyGoogle Inc. is evil. Or maybe it isn’t. Perhaps no other technology company in history has worked quite so hard to cultivate a wholesome, trusting image as Google, what with its primary coloured-search engine, the stories of free M&M’s candies for employees and its famous “Don’t be evil” corporate mantra.Indeed, beyond its playful branding, Google has spent much of the past decade casting itself in the role of Defender of the Open Internet, hero to users, ally of advertisers and enemy of all that is soulless and wrong in the dark corners of the Web.But lately, it seems, perceptions of Google have changed. There are those who now see Google as an anti-hero, an overgrown bully, drunk on its own power, collecting the data of millions of users in an effort to line its own pockets, privacy be damned.In a word, evil.Which is utter nonsense. This week, alarm bells went off throughout the technology industry and the blogosphere when Google announced a series of updates to its privacy policies. At the core of the changes are Google’s plans to consolidate most of its 70-odd privacy rules that govern its various properties — including YouTube, Gmail, and its search engine — into a single, overarching Google privacy policy. (Photo: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

Is Google evil? Not really
Google Inc. is evil. Or maybe it isn’t. Perhaps no other technology company in history has worked quite so hard to cultivate a wholesome, trusting image as Google, what with its primary coloured-search engine, the stories of free M&M’s candies for employees and its famous “Don’t be evil” corporate mantra.

Indeed, beyond its playful branding, Google has spent much of the past decade casting itself in the role of Defender of the Open Internet, hero to users, ally of advertisers and enemy of all that is soulless and wrong in the dark corners of the Web.

But lately, it seems, perceptions of Google have changed. There are those who now see Google as an anti-hero, an overgrown bully, drunk on its own power, collecting the data of millions of users in an effort to line its own pockets, privacy be damned.

In a word, evil.

Which is utter nonsense. This week, alarm bells went off throughout the technology industry and the blogosphere when Google announced a series of updates to its privacy policies. At the core of the changes are Google’s plans to consolidate most of its 70-odd privacy rules that govern its various properties — including YouTube, Gmail, and its search engine — into a single, overarching Google privacy policy. (Photo: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

Tagged with:  #technology  #Google  #privacy