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National Post

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REVIEW: Kick-Ass 2 is almost as good as the original — just don’t tell Jim Carrey

Because it’s really violent, too. MORE HERE: natpo.st/14C6pjF

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Statue of Colin Firth emerging from the water as Mr. Darcy installed in London’s Hyde Park
It’s a 12-foot fibreglass recreation of the moment that made Firth a sex symbol, and you can swim right up to it! More here: natpo.st/1daTZnR

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Statue of Colin Firth emerging from the water as Mr. Darcy installed in London’s Hyde Park

It’s a 12-foot fibreglass recreation of the moment that made Firth a sex symbol, and you can swim right up to it! More here: natpo.st/1daTZnR

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‘Offensive’ and ‘unflattering’: What the critics are saying about Johnny Depp’s Tonto: natpo.st/15iwgS0

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‘Offensive’ and ‘unflattering’: What the critics are saying about Johnny Depp’s Tonto: natpo.st/15iwgS0

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Why World War Z should have been made into a video game, not a movie
By Chad Sapieha 
World War Z shouldn’t be a movie. It should be a game.
Perhaps the biggest obstacle faced in turning the book into a film was the constraint of time. Mr. Brooks sketched out the entire history of a global apocalypse, delving into the political and religious tensions that crept up during the crisis, the bureaucratic chaos resultant from the confusion, the military strategies that worked and didn’t, and the personal stories of people in a dozen different countries in the space of a couple of hours. How do you fit all that into two hours?
You can’t.
But in a game you might have 10 times the length of a movie to work with. That’s enough to tell 20 hour-long tales each with it own protagonist(s) in chapter-like presentation – much like the book – and create a meaningful mosaic of lives, events, and social and governmental patterns taking shape across the world.
This last is key in capturing the heart of Mr. Brooks’ novel, which endeavours to realistically examine how not just America and Americans would deal with an uprising of undead, but how the global community would fare.
http://bit.ly/10iw7w2

postarcadenp:

Why World War Z should have been made into a video game, not a movie

By Chad Sapieha 

World War Z shouldn’t be a movie. It should be a game.

Perhaps the biggest obstacle faced in turning the book into a film was the constraint of time. Mr. Brooks sketched out the entire history of a global apocalypse, delving into the political and religious tensions that crept up during the crisis, the bureaucratic chaos resultant from the confusion, the military strategies that worked and didn’t, and the personal stories of people in a dozen different countries in the space of a couple of hours. How do you fit all that into two hours?

You can’t.

But in a game you might have 10 times the length of a movie to work with. That’s enough to tell 20 hour-long tales each with it own protagonist(s) in chapter-like presentation – much like the book – and create a meaningful mosaic of lives, events, and social and governmental patterns taking shape across the world.

This last is key in capturing the heart of Mr. Brooks’ novel, which endeavours to realistically examine how not just America and Americans would deal with an uprising of undead, but how the global community would fare.

http://bit.ly/10iw7w2

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Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig combined their personal and professional lives to make Frances Ha: natpo.st/10wQO9P
[Illustration by Chloe Cushman]

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Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig combined their personal and professional lives to make Frances Ha: natpo.st/10wQO9P

[Illustration by Chloe Cushman]

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They’re making a movie about Grumpy Cat, starring Grumpy Cat.

Details here, because you know you want them: natpo.st/1aEdfch

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Want to know which title sequences are being referenced in Google’s great Saul Bass Doodle? Here’s a list
On Wednesday, Google celebrated the occasion of what would have been graphic designer Saul Bass’ 93rd birthday with an outstanding animated, interactive graphic referencing some of the designer’s best-known opening credits. Bass, who was best known for his work with Alfred Hitchcock, also designed title credits and posters for West Side Story and Spartacus, among other films, but where do those titles (and others) fit into the Google animation? 

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Summer movie preview: From After Earth to World War Z, It’s the end of the world as we know it at cinemas this season: natpo.st/10jB1VY

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Where could they be now? A theoretical look at Leia, Han and Luke (and the rest of the gang) will be up to in Star Wars: Episode 7 natpo.st/11ljY8L

Awesome illustration by Steve Murray.

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Where could they be now? A theoretical look at Leia, Han and Luke (and the rest of the gang) will be up to in Star Wars: Episode 7 natpo.st/11ljY8L

Awesome illustration by Steve Murray.

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Legendary film critic Roger Ebert dead at 70Roger Ebert, the most famous and most popular film reviewer of his time who become the first journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism and, on his long-running TV program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb, died Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 70.Ebert had been a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967. He had announced on his blog Wednesday that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.He had no grand theories or special agendas, but millions recognized the chatty, heavy-set man with wavy hair and horn-rimmed glasses. Above all, they followed the thumb — pointing up or down. It was the main logo of the televised shows Ebert co-hosted, first with the late Gene Siskel of the rival Chicago Tribune and — after Siskel’s death in 1999 — with his Sun-Times colleague, Richard Roeper. Although criticized as gimmicky and simplistic, a “two thumbs up” accolade was sure to find its way into the advertising for the movie in question. (Illustration: Kagan McLeod/National Post)

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Legendary film critic Roger Ebert dead at 70
Roger Ebert, the most famous and most popular film reviewer of his time who become the first journalist to win a Pulitzer Prize for movie criticism and, on his long-running TV program, wielded the nation’s most influential thumb, died Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 70.

Ebert had been a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967. He had announced on his blog Wednesday that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.

He had no grand theories or special agendas, but millions recognized the chatty, heavy-set man with wavy hair and horn-rimmed glasses. Above all, they followed the thumb — pointing up or down. It was the main logo of the televised shows Ebert co-hosted, first with the late Gene Siskel of the rival Chicago Tribune and — after Siskel’s death in 1999 — with his Sun-Times colleague, Richard Roeper. Although criticized as gimmicky and simplistic, a “two thumbs up” accolade was sure to find its way into the advertising for the movie in question. (Illustration: Kagan McLeod/National Post)

(via nparts)

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Disney plans to just keep swimming, will release Finding Dory in 2015: natpo.st/13OKgVo

Did you know that there are 14 novels in Frank Baum’s Oz series? To celebrate the release of “Oz the Great and Powerful” the National Post's Steve Murray has illustrated 276 of them. Click through for annotations on who all of them are!

Did you know that there are 14 novels in Frank Baum’s Oz series? To celebrate the release of “Oz the Great and Powerful” the National Post's Steve Murray has illustrated 276 of them. Click through for annotations on who all of them are!

Meet the BatBerry, an all-Canadian V8-powered Batmobile replica
Restoring something along the lines of a Ferrari 308 GTS, preparing a 1989 Mazda Miata for the racetrack or building a replica of a Lamborghini Countach are all viable choices for a weekend project car from the 1980s. Meanwhile, cars used in movies are usually limited to scale models sitting on a bookshelf or in a display cabinet.

Very rarely are the two combined, yet that is exactly what Tim Neil is doing in his spare time. By day, he works for BlackBerry and application developers to deliver apps for the company.

By night the diehard Subaru fanatic works on a project more suited for the streets of Gotham City rather than Toronto. He calls it the BatBerry — an exact replica of the Batmobile used in Tim Burton’s Batman films. (Nick Tragianis/National Post)

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Ben Affleck and producer Grant Heslov along with members of the cast and crew accept the Best Picture award for Argo. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
More: http://natpo.st/XzvSrs

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Ben Affleck and producer Grant Heslov along with members of the cast and crew accept the Best Picture award for Argo. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

More: http://natpo.st/XzvSrs

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Oscars 2013: The great host debate
Our film critic and arts & life editor go head-to-head to discuss whether or not there ought to be an Academy Awards master of ceremonies. Arts editor Barry Hertz says the position should be nixed; critic Chris Knight disagrees. What do you think?

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Oscars 2013: The great host debate

Our film critic and arts & life editor go head-to-head to discuss whether or not there ought to be an Academy Awards master of ceremonies. Arts editor Barry Hertz says the position should be nixed; critic Chris Knight disagrees. What do you think?

Tagged with:  #Oscars  #movies  #film  #Seth MacFarlane