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National Post

npostlife:

Do you like your Maker’s Mark with a spot of water? How about watered down?Will the Maker’s Mark brand suffer now that the Kentucky-based distillers of the craft bourbon have said they’ll reduce their product from 45% to 42% ABV?[Photo credit: Handout]

npostlife:

Do you like your Maker’s Mark with a spot of water? How about watered down?
Will the Maker’s Mark brand suffer now that the Kentucky-based distillers of the craft bourbon have said they’ll reduce their product from 45% to 42% ABV?
[Photo credit: Handout]

Tagged with:  #whisky  #bourbon  #liquor  #alcohol  #drinking

gastropost:

Being on the ever-wise and food-savvy TEAM CHERRY, I’m in the process of making the brandied cherries from this week’s secret mission (shh … you have to join Gastropost in order to be given the secret misssion).

Was it extravagant/decadent to use so posh a brandy as the Hennessy VS Cognac I used for my Happy Hour column last week (in the special edition bottle by New York street artist KAWS)? Yes. But that’s OK.

These cherries will take a month to mature in the refrigerator. In the meantime:

A question: Will the liquid that surrounds the brandied cherries be useable in cocktails as homemade cherry brandy?
An observation: Having picked up a cherry pitter for $9 at Good Egg in Kensington, I can report that clicking the pits out of cherries sort of gave me an unwholesome feeling, as if I were hurting the poor little things. Meanwhile the pitting made my kitchen counter look like a murder scene. Yet an odd satisfaction resulted, which it is best not to ponder too deeply.

A northern hamlet battles with the bottleEvery year around Christmas, the hamlet of Cambridge Bay in Nunavut bans the sale of alcohol, and every year the crime rate in the community takes a nose dive.This year, when the local council lifted the ban shortly after New Year’s Day, alcohol began flowing back into Cambridge Bay with reports of up to 4,000 pounds’ worth of liquor arriving by plane into the community of 1,800 in a single day.This month, police saw the first violent death in the community in more than a year, charging a 22-year-old with second-degree murder in the death of a 19-year-old woman. It was a crime police say was fuelled by alcohol and whose violence has reignited discussion around whether Cambridge Bay, like most other communities in the territory, should permanently ban or restrict the sale of alcohol.“If it wasn’t for alcohol, two scouts and a whistle” would be enough to police the hamlet, RCMP Sergeant Charlie Gauthier told the Nunatsiaq News.

A northern hamlet battles with the bottle

Every year around Christmas, the hamlet of Cambridge Bay in Nunavut bans the sale of alcohol, and every year the crime rate in the community takes a nose dive.

This year, when the local council lifted the ban shortly after New Year’s Day, alcohol began flowing back into Cambridge Bay with reports of up to 4,000 pounds’ worth of liquor arriving by plane into the community of 1,800 in a single day.

This month, police saw the first violent death in the community in more than a year, charging a 22-year-old with second-degree murder in the death of a 19-year-old woman. It was a crime police say was fuelled by alcohol and whose violence has reignited discussion around whether Cambridge Bay, like most other communities in the territory, should permanently ban or restrict the sale of alcohol.

“If it wasn’t for alcohol, two scouts and a whistle” would be enough to police the hamlet, RCMP Sergeant Charlie Gauthier told the Nunatsiaq News.