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Atheism a creed that needs the same religious protections of Christianity and Islam: Ontario Human Rights TribunalAtheism is a creed deserving of the the same religious protections as Christianity, Islam, and other faiths, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal has ruled in a new decision.“Protection against discrimination because of religion, in my view, must include protection of the applicants’ belief that there is no deity,” wrote David A. Wright, associate chair of the commission, in an August 13 decision.The ruling was spurred by a complaint from self-described secular humanist Rene Chouinard, who was opposing the District School Board of Niagara’s policy regarding the distribution of Gideon bibles. (Photo: Glenn Lowson photo for National Post)

Atheism a creed that needs the same religious protections of Christianity and Islam: Ontario Human Rights Tribunal
Atheism is a creed deserving of the the same religious protections as Christianity, Islam, and other faiths, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal has ruled in a new decision.

“Protection against discrimination because of religion, in my view, must include protection of the applicants’ belief that there is no deity,” wrote David A. Wright, associate chair of the commission, in an August 13 decision.

The ruling was spurred by a complaint from self-described secular humanist Rene Chouinard, who was opposing the District School Board of Niagara’s policy regarding the distribution of Gideon bibles. (Photo: Glenn Lowson photo for National Post)

Tagged with:  #news  #religion  #theism  #human rights
Saskatoon could face human rights complaint after refusing to yank ‘Merry Christmas’ message from busesThe city of Saskatoon is facing the possibility of a human rights complaint after it refused to yank the “Merry Christmas” message from the top of its buses despite allegations of discrimination.On Monday Ashu Solo vowed to take the matter to the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission, claiming the Christmas greetings violate his right to be free from religion.He said the salutation also favours Christianity over other religions, which is particularly problematic for Saskatoon’s immigrant community, many of whom rely on bus service.“Christmas messages on Saskatoon Transit buses make them feel like they need to convert to Christianity to be first-class citizens,” he wrote in a complaint.“Therefore, the Christmas messages on Saskatoon Transit buses are a forcible attempt at Christian indoctrination.” (Gord Waldner/Postmedia News)

Saskatoon could face human rights complaint after refusing to yank ‘Merry Christmas’ message from buses
The city of Saskatoon is facing the possibility of a human rights complaint after it refused to yank the “Merry Christmas” message from the top of its buses despite allegations of discrimination.

On Monday Ashu Solo vowed to take the matter to the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission, claiming the Christmas greetings violate his right to be free from religion.

He said the salutation also favours Christianity over other religions, which is particularly problematic for Saskatoon’s immigrant community, many of whom rely on bus service.

“Christmas messages on Saskatoon Transit buses make them feel like they need to convert to Christianity to be first-class citizens,” he wrote in a complaint.

“Therefore, the Christmas messages on Saskatoon Transit buses are a forcible attempt at Christian indoctrination.” (Gord Waldner/Postmedia News)

Harper launches tourism campaign on China trip
Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced a new Canadian tourism marketing  campaign in China on Wednesday during the first full day of his trade  mission in the Middle Kingdom, urging Chinese travellers to spend their  tourism dollars in Canada.

Harper launches tourism campaign on China trip

Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced a new Canadian tourism marketing campaign in China on Wednesday during the first full day of his trade mission in the Middle Kingdom, urging Chinese travellers to spend their tourism dollars in Canada.

Syria’s ‘bloodiest day’: Over 200 die in midst of ‘unprecedented massacre’Syrian forces killed 111 people ahead of the start of a mission to monitor President Bashar al-Assad’s implementation of an Arab League peace plan, activists said on Wednesday, and France branded the killings an “unprecedented massacre.”Rami Abdulrahman of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 111 civilians and activists were killed in addition to over 100 casualties among army deserters in Idlib province, turning Tuesday into the “bloodiest day of the Syrian revolution.”“There was a massacre of an unprecedented scale in Syria on Tuesday,” said French foreign ministry spokesman Bernard Valero. “It is urgent that the UN Security Council issues a firm resolution that calls for an end to the repression.”

Syria’s ‘bloodiest day’: Over 200 die in midst of ‘unprecedented massacre’
Syrian forces killed 111 people ahead of the start of a mission to monitor President Bashar al-Assad’s implementation of an Arab League peace plan, activists said on Wednesday, and France branded the killings an “unprecedented massacre.”

Rami Abdulrahman of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 111 civilians and activists were killed in addition to over 100 casualties among army deserters in Idlib province, turning Tuesday into the “bloodiest day of the Syrian revolution.”

“There was a massacre of an unprecedented scale in Syria on Tuesday,” said French foreign ministry spokesman Bernard Valero. “It is urgent that the UN Security Council issues a firm resolution that calls for an end to the repression.”

Amnesty: Canada ‘required’ to arrest George W. BushAmnesty International called on Canadian authorities Wednesday to arrest and prosecute George W. Bush, saying the former U.S. president authorized “torture” when he directed the U.S.-led war on terror.Bush is expected to attend an economic summit in Surrey in Canada’s westernmost British Columbia province on October 20.The London-based group charged that Bush has legal responsibility for a series of human rights violations in a memorandum submitted last month to Canada’s attorney general but only now released to the media.“Canada is required by its international obligations to arrest and prosecute former president Bush given his responsibility for crimes under international law including torture,” Amnesty’s Susan Lee said in a statement.“As the U.S. authorities have, so far, failed to bring former president Bush to justice, the international community must step in. A failure by Canada to take action during his visit would violate the UN Convention Against Torture and demonstrate contempt for fundamental human rights,” Lee said. (Photo: Larry Downing/Reuters)

Amnesty: Canada ‘required’ to arrest George W. Bush
Amnesty International called on Canadian authorities Wednesday to arrest and prosecute George W. Bush, saying the former U.S. president authorized “torture” when he directed the U.S.-led war on terror.

Bush is expected to attend an economic summit in Surrey in Canada’s westernmost British Columbia province on October 20.

The London-based group charged that Bush has legal responsibility for a series of human rights violations in a memorandum submitted last month to Canada’s attorney general but only now released to the media.

“Canada is required by its international obligations to arrest and prosecute former president Bush given his responsibility for crimes under international law including torture,” Amnesty’s Susan Lee said in a statement.

“As the U.S. authorities have, so far, failed to bring former president Bush to justice, the international community must step in. A failure by Canada to take action during his visit would violate the UN Convention Against Torture and demonstrate contempt for fundamental human rights,” Lee said. (Photo: Larry Downing/Reuters)

'Virginity tests' done, general saysAn Egyptian general said the military conducted forced “virginity tests” on female protesters in March, actions that have outraged Egyptian activists who called for demonstrations to condemn the incident."The girls who were detained were not like your daughter or mine," the general, who did not want to be named, told CNN."We didn’t want them to say we had sexually assaulted or raped them, so we wanted to prove that they weren’t virgins in the first place."These were girls who had camped out in tents with male protesters in Tahrir Square, and we found in the tents Molotov cocktails and [drugs]," he said.Amnesty International had previously called on the government to investigate accusations that the army tortured and abused women arrested in the protests. (Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

'Virginity tests' done, general says
An Egyptian general said the military conducted forced “virginity tests” on female protesters in March, actions that have outraged Egyptian activists who called for demonstrations to condemn the incident.

"The girls who were detained were not like your daughter or mine," the general, who did not want to be named, told CNN.

"We didn’t want them to say we had sexually assaulted or raped them, so we wanted to prove that they weren’t virgins in the first place.

"These were girls who had camped out in tents with male protesters in Tahrir Square, and we found in the tents Molotov cocktails and [drugs]," he said.

Amnesty International had previously called on the government to investigate accusations that the army tortured and abused women arrested in the protests. (Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Jonathan Kay: Bin Laden’s killing shows us the irrelevance of “international law”This past week, the NDP’s Thomas Mulcair became a figure of ridicule for suggesting that the United States doesn’t have photos of Osama bin Laden’s body — presumably, in his imagination, because the al-Qaeda leader isn’t really dead. But Mr. Mulcair made another interesting comment about the U.S. raid, which did not get as much attention: “We have to understand whether or not there was an action of self defence or whether there was something that was more in the style of a direct killing and that has to do with American law and with international law as well.”The idea that the legitimacy of this brilliantly executed American raid might be cast into doubt by the dogmas of “international law” can only be described as quaint — the sort of debating point that would have been taken seriously when the Twin Towers were still standing. In 2011, it sounds only slightly less marginal than the idea that bin Laden still walks the earth.The exact moment when we knew “international law” had little to say about the war against terrorism came on November 3, 2002. That was the day an American Predator drone, flying high above the Yemeni outback 100 miles east of Sanaa, fired a Hellfire missile into a car containing al-Qaeda’s local commander, Abu Ali al-Harithi, and five jihadi comrades. Photos of the scene show a black hole in the ground where the car once stood — a suitable metaphor for the once-fashionable notion that “international law” trumps a nation’s right to defend itself. (Illustration: Richard Johnson/National Post)

Jonathan Kay: Bin Laden’s killing shows us the irrelevance of “international law”
This past week, the NDP’s Thomas Mulcair became a figure of ridicule for suggesting that the United States doesn’t have photos of Osama bin Laden’s body — presumably, in his imagination, because the al-Qaeda leader isn’t really dead. But Mr. Mulcair made another interesting comment about the U.S. raid, which did not get as much attention: “We have to understand whether or not there was an action of self defence or whether there was something that was more in the style of a direct killing and that has to do with American law and with international law as well.”

The idea that the legitimacy of this brilliantly executed American raid might be cast into doubt by the dogmas of “international law” can only be described as quaint — the sort of debating point that would have been taken seriously when the Twin Towers were still standing. In 2011, it sounds only slightly less marginal than the idea that bin Laden still walks the earth.

The exact moment when we knew “international law” had little to say about the war against terrorism came on November 3, 2002. That was the day an American Predator drone, flying high above the Yemeni outback 100 miles east of Sanaa, fired a Hellfire missile into a car containing al-Qaeda’s local commander, Abu Ali al-Harithi, and five jihadi comrades. Photos of the scene show a black hole in the ground where the car once stood — a suitable metaphor for the once-fashionable notion that “international law” trumps a nation’s right to defend itself. (Illustration: Richard Johnson/National Post)

France enacts ban on face veilsFrance’s ban on full face veils, a first in Europe, went into force on Monday, making anyone wearing the Muslim niqab or burqa in public liable to a fine of 150 euros (US$216) or lessons in French citizenship.Photo: Kenza Drider, a French Muslim of North African descent, wears a niqab outside the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, April 11, 2011. (Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters)

France enacts ban on face veils
France’s ban on full face veils, a first in Europe, went into force on Monday, making anyone wearing the Muslim niqab or burqa in public liable to a fine of 150 euros (US$216) or lessons in French citizenship.

Photo: Kenza Drider, a French Muslim of North African descent, wears a niqab outside the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, April 11, 2011. (Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters)

Gaddafi forces move in on western borderLibyan leader Muammar Gaddafi deployed forces to a western border area on Tuesday in defiance of Western military and economic pressure, raising fears that one of the bloodiest Arab revolts may become more violent still.Christopher Hitchens: Arab unrest leaves Obama as helpless as a hostageUN set to adopt report that praises Libya’s human-rights recordGoodspeed Analysis: Mission to save citizens in Libya a first for ChinaSee all of Gary Clement’s cartoons.

Gaddafi forces move in on western border
Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi deployed forces to a western border area on Tuesday in defiance of Western military and economic pressure, raising fears that one of the bloodiest Arab revolts may become more violent still.

Christopher Hitchens: Arab unrest leaves Obama as helpless as a hostage
UN set to adopt report that praises Libya’s human-rights record
Goodspeed Analysis: Mission to save citizens in Libya a first for China

See all of Gary Clement’s cartoons.

David Frum: Gaddafi learns a lesson in fair weather friendshipIt’s been a bad 24 hours for Muammar Gaddafi. The Obama administration has urged that Libya be expelled from the UN Human Rights Council. Switzerland has frozen his assets. Human rights groups of various stripes are urging intervention. It all makes you wonder: where were they a month ago, when Qaddafi was just as heinous as he is today?

David Frum: Gaddafi learns a lesson in fair weather friendship
It’s been a bad 24 hours for Muammar Gaddafi. The Obama administration has urged that Libya be expelled from the UN Human Rights Council. Switzerland has frozen his assets. Human rights groups of various stripes are urging intervention. It all makes you wonder: where were they a month ago, when Qaddafi was just as heinous as he is today?

U.S.-Chinese tensions visible as Obama, Hu meet
“We welcome China’s rise,” Mr. Obama said. “We just want to make sure that that rise is done in a way that reinforces international norms and international rules, and enhances security and peace.”
See all of Gary Clement’s cartoons.

U.S.-Chinese tensions visible as Obama, Hu meet

“We welcome China’s rise,” Mr. Obama said. “We just want to make sure that that rise is done in a way that reinforces international norms and international rules, and enhances security and peace.”

See all of Gary Clement’s cartoons.