Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

National Post

Alberta professor flexes her muscles for feminismEarlier this month, Lianne McTavish trotted before a row of male judges sporting a spray-on tan and bedazzled bikini, blonde hair extensions and fake nails. Then, under sweltering lights and standing on teetering heels, she twisted and posed to showcase her bulging muscles, her 25 inch waist, and her meticulously crafted derriere.This is the same Professor McTavish who teaches art history at the University of Alberta, a woman who was once a “dowdy ass-kicking feminist,” her life’s work committed to lobbying for reproductive rights and teaching students about body image in the Renaissance period.Lianne McTavish on stage as Feminist Figure Girl, Northern Alberta Bodybuilding Championships, June 4, 2011But the 43-year-old’s transformation into a ripped body building competitor is not a ‘‘good riddance’’ to her feminist past —if anything, it’s been a segue to a future of turning the public’s view of a feminist on its head. She’s also turned her quest for the perfect “figure girl” body into a research project and a politicized discussion about feminism with her blog FeministFigureGirl.com, a chronicle of her journey from flabby to fit under the banner ‘Look Hot While You Fight the Patriarchy.’ (Photo: David Ford)

Alberta professor flexes her muscles for feminism
Earlier this month, Lianne McTavish trotted before a row of male judges sporting a spray-on tan and bedazzled bikini, blonde hair extensions and fake nails. Then, under sweltering lights and standing on teetering heels, she twisted and posed to showcase her bulging muscles, her 25 inch waist, and her meticulously crafted derriere.

This is the same Professor McTavish who teaches art history at the University of Alberta, a woman who was once a “dowdy ass-kicking feminist,” her life’s work committed to lobbying for reproductive rights and teaching students about body image in the Renaissance period.

Lianne McTavish on stage as Feminist Figure Girl, Northern Alberta Bodybuilding Championships, June 4, 2011

But the 43-year-old’s transformation into a ripped body building competitor is not a ‘‘good riddance’’ to her feminist past —if anything, it’s been a segue to a future of turning the public’s view of a feminist on its head. She’s also turned her quest for the perfect “figure girl” body into a research project and a politicized discussion about feminism with her blog FeministFigureGirl.com, a chronicle of her journey from flabby to fit under the banner ‘Look Hot While You Fight the Patriarchy.’ (Photo: David Ford)

Robert Fulford: How feminism changed the world With the 100th International Women’s Day upon on us, this is surely the moment to acknowledge that feminists have fundamentally changed society throughout the democracies of the West. And changed it much for the better.Barbara Kay: How Sarah Palin kneecapped feminism The feminist revolution began as a necessary reform movement, but unfortunately evolved into a marxism-imbued, revolutionary one. Second-wave feminism’s focus soon shifted from women’s equal rights (which are limited to those defined by law) to women’s interests (which are limitless), as perceived through a victim’s lens.Tasha Kheiriddin: Feminism’s second-wave hangover The status of Western women today is still at odds with our aspirations, but in a different way. Instead of being liberated to do what we want, women now are not only free — but expected — to do everything, want it or not. Bring home the bacon, fry it up, drive the kids to soccer, and clean the house. We have become the harried Econowives of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale — or, increasingly, econo single mothers. At the same time, fewer women are having children, some by choice, but more by failure to find a mate, or to mate in time.Photo: British musicians V.V Brown (L), Annie Lennox (2nd L), Paloma Faith (3rd R), Speech Debelle (2nd R), Emmy the Great (R) and British television presenter, Gaby Roslin (3rd L), pose for photographers with a birthday cake to mark the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day in London, on March 8, 2011. Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

Robert Fulford: How feminism changed the world
With the 100th International Women’s Day upon on us, this is surely the moment to acknowledge that feminists have fundamentally changed society throughout the democracies of the West. And changed it much for the better.

Barbara Kay: How Sarah Palin kneecapped feminism
The feminist revolution began as a necessary reform movement, but unfortunately evolved into a marxism-imbued, revolutionary one. Second-wave feminism’s focus soon shifted from women’s equal rights (which are limited to those defined by law) to women’s interests (which are limitless), as perceived through a victim’s lens.

Tasha Kheiriddin: Feminism’s second-wave hangover
The status of Western women today is still at odds with our aspirations, but in a different way. Instead of being liberated to do what we want, women now are not only free — but expected — to do everything, want it or not. Bring home the bacon, fry it up, drive the kids to soccer, and clean the house. We have become the harried Econowives of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale — or, increasingly, econo single mothers. At the same time, fewer women are having children, some by choice, but more by failure to find a mate, or to mate in time.

Photo: British musicians V.V Brown (L), Annie Lennox (2nd L), Paloma Faith (3rd R), Speech Debelle (2nd R), Emmy the Great (R) and British television presenter, Gaby Roslin (3rd L), pose for photographers with a birthday cake to mark the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day in London, on March 8, 2011. Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)