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Welcome to the National Post’s election night special feature, Battlefield Canada. Starting at 10 p.m. ET, this map will be updated love as political parties clash to seize control of our key battlegrounds and Canada’s parliament.
Live Now: Election 2011 pre-game showJoin the National Post team for our live coverage as results come in for the 2011 Federal Election. Until 10:00 p.m. ET we’ll preview the key ridings and candidates you’ll want to watch. Polls close across the country at 10:00 p.m. ET and we’ll have all the breaking results and instant analysis.

Welcome to the National Post’s election night special feature, Battlefield Canada. Starting at 10 p.m. ET, this map will be updated love as political parties clash to seize control of our key battlegrounds and Canada’s parliament.

Live Now: Election 2011 pre-game show
Join the National Post team for our live coverage as results come in for the 2011 Federal Election. Until 10:00 p.m. ET we’ll preview the key ridings and candidates you’ll want to watch. Polls close across the country at 10:00 p.m. ET and we’ll have all the breaking results and instant analysis.

Election 2011 will be one for the books One seasoned pollster deemed it the “Seinfeld election” — the election about nothing. But the election about nothing soon became a historic competition with an unprecedented narrative, driven by a cast of characters who were themselves scrambling to understand the suddenly wily electoral landscape.Live Now: Election 2011 pre-game showJoin the National Post team for our live coverage as results come in for the 2011 Federal Election. Until 10:00 p.m. ET we’ll preview the key ridings and candidates you’ll want to watch. Polls close across the country at 10:00 p.m. ET and we’ll have all the breaking results and instant analysis.

Election 2011 will be one for the books
One seasoned pollster deemed it the “Seinfeld election” — the election about nothing. But the election about nothing soon became a historic competition with an unprecedented narrative, driven by a cast of characters who were themselves scrambling to understand the suddenly wily electoral landscape.

Live Now: Election 2011 pre-game show
Join the National Post team for our live coverage as results come in for the 2011 Federal Election. Until 10:00 p.m. ET we’ll preview the key ridings and candidates you’ll want to watch. Polls close across the country at 10:00 p.m. ET and we’ll have all the breaking results and instant analysis.

Conservative leader Stephen Harper, NDP Leader Jack Layton, Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff and Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May cast their ballots for the Canadian Federal Election (Postmedia News/Pool)Live Now: Election 2011 pre-game showJoin the National Post team for our live coverage as results come in for the 2011 Federal Election. Until 10:00 p.m. ET we’ll preview the key ridings and candidates you’ll want to watch. Polls close across the country at 10:00 p.m. ET and we’ll have all the breaking results and instant analysis.

Conservative leader Stephen Harper, NDP Leader Jack Layton, Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff and Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May cast their ballots for the Canadian Federal Election (Postmedia News/Pool)

Live Now: Election 2011 pre-game show
Join the National Post team for our live coverage as results come in for the 2011 Federal Election. Until 10:00 p.m. ET we’ll preview the key ridings and candidates you’ll want to watch. Polls close across the country at 10:00 p.m. ET and we’ll have all the breaking results and instant analysis.

Join us tonight for our LIVE #elxn41 night coverage, Battlefield CanadaMao Tse-Tung once said, “Politics is war without bloodshed.” And while we can assume that there will be no harm done as Canadians head to the polls Monday, there will certainly be no love lost as the country’s five main political parties grapple for control of Canada in what may be the most wide-open election in recent memory.Indeed, there will be no shortage of action Monday night once the results start pouring in, and the National Post has you covered with our special election night online feature, Battlefield Canada. Click here for detailsOur complete Election 2011 coverageLatest Election 2011 newsFull Comment on Election 2011

Join us tonight for our LIVE #elxn41 night coverage, Battlefield Canada

Mao Tse-Tung once said, “Politics is war without bloodshed.” And while we can assume that there will be no harm done as Canadians head to the polls Monday, there will certainly be no love lost as the country’s five main political parties grapple for control of Canada in what may be the most wide-open election in recent memory.

Indeed, there will be no shortage of action Monday night once the results start pouring in, and the National Post has you covered with our special election night online feature, Battlefield CanadaClick here for details

Our complete Election 2011 coverage

Latest Election 2011 news

Full Comment on Election 2011

Layton would make best PM, voters say Poll after poll Wednesday confirmed Jack Layton’s NDP is in a solid second place, even as a new leadership survey suggests Canadians now feel he’d make the best prime minister of the pack.The opposite of ‘stability’ is ‘NDP government’ Kelly McParland: If Jack Layton does win Monday’s vote, he’s going to have a hard time finding coalition partnersRoy Green: Liberal narcissism driving voters to NDPIncreasingly abandoned by even usually loyal Liberal voters, Ignatieff has gradually morphed from a Clint Eastwood wanna-be who challenged “if you mess with me, I will mess with you until I’m done”, to a candidate devoid of headline-snaring one liners. Best forgotten are statements like Canadians “can smell the whiff of sulphur” emanating from Stephen Harper.

Layton would make best PM, voters say
Poll after poll Wednesday confirmed Jack Layton’s NDP is in a solid second place, even as a new leadership survey suggests Canadians now feel he’d make the best prime minister of the pack.

The opposite of ‘stability’ is ‘NDP government’
Kelly McParland: If Jack Layton does win Monday’s vote, he’s going to have a hard time finding coalition partners

Roy Green: Liberal narcissism driving voters to NDP
Increasingly abandoned by even usually loyal Liberal voters, Ignatieff has gradually morphed from a Clint Eastwood wanna-be who challenged “if you mess with me, I will mess with you until I’m done”, to a candidate devoid of headline-snaring one liners. Best forgotten are statements like Canadians “can smell the whiff of sulphur” emanating from Stephen Harper.

Scott Stinson: Liberals, NDP maybe not so compatible On Wednesday, Michael Ignatieff was again fending off coalition questions, but now the reporters want to know what he thinks of being the  junior partner in such an arrangement. It’s a notion that Mr. Ignatieff would have been fair to equate with toads falling from the sky as recently as last weekend, but now several polls suggest he is staring such a possibility right in its ugly, pimpled kisser.Layton would make best PM, voters say Poll after poll Wednesday confirmed Jack Layton’s NDP is in a solid second place, even as a new leadership survey suggests Canadians now feel he’d make the best prime minister of the pack.NDP surge means some unlikely candidates have a shot at Parliament As long as the NDP has existed, its candidates in Quebec have run secure in the knowledge they would not be moving to Ottawa after election day. Only two New Democrats from the province have ever won office. But now, as opinion polls show the party leading in the province, its slate of 75 largely unknown faces is coming under unprecedented scrutiny, with sometimes surprising results.

Scott Stinson: Liberals, NDP maybe not so compatible
On Wednesday, Michael Ignatieff was again fending off coalition questions, but now the reporters want to know what he thinks of being the  junior partner in such an arrangement. It’s a notion that Mr. Ignatieff would have been fair to equate with toads falling from the sky as recently as last weekend, but now several polls suggest he is staring such a possibility right in its ugly, pimpled kisser.

Layton would make best PM, voters say
Poll after poll Wednesday confirmed Jack Layton’s NDP is in a solid second place, even as a new leadership survey suggests Canadians now feel he’d make the best prime minister of the pack.

NDP surge means some unlikely candidates have a shot at Parliament
As long as the NDP has existed, its candidates in Quebec have run secure in the knowledge they would not be moving to Ottawa after election day. Only two New Democrats from the province have ever won office. But now, as opinion polls show the party leading in the province, its slate of 75 largely unknown faces is coming under unprecedented scrutiny, with sometimes surprising results.

Road map to a potential NDP breakthrough Just six days remain in the federal election campaign, and poll after poll shows the NDP soaring ahead of the Liberals nationally and the Bloc Quebecois in La Belle Province. Analysts say if the momentum sticks, Jack Layton’s party could add dozens of seats to the 37 it already claims in the House of Commons. Which ridings, then, are potential NDP pick-ups? To glean a picture of the cross-country landscape, the National Post’s Kathryn Blaze Carlson spoke with Ipsos Reid president Darrell Bricker, B.C.-based former NDP strategist Bill Tieleman, NDP pundit Ian Capstick, and Youri Rivest, vice-president of Quebec-based polling firm CROP.Terence Corcoran: Just a smiling Jack-in-the-boxNDP makes ‘astonishing’ move ahead of the Liberals: pollFed-up voters fueling NDP rise: pollsters

Road map to a potential NDP breakthrough
Just six days remain in the federal election campaign, and poll after poll shows the NDP soaring ahead of the Liberals nationally and the Bloc Quebecois in La Belle Province. Analysts say if the momentum sticks, Jack Layton’s party could add dozens of seats to the 37 it already claims in the House of Commons. Which ridings, then, are potential NDP pick-ups? To glean a picture of the cross-country landscape, the National Post’s Kathryn Blaze Carlson spoke with Ipsos Reid president Darrell Bricker, B.C.-based former NDP strategist Bill Tieleman, NDP pundit Ian Capstick, and Youri Rivest, vice-president of Quebec-based polling firm CROP.

Terence Corcoran: Just a smiling Jack-in-the-box
NDP makes ‘astonishing’ move ahead of the Liberals: poll
Fed-up voters fueling NDP rise: pollsters

Follow the leaders: Day 32 How do you stem a surging NDP with less than a week before Canadians head to the polls? If you’re Conservative Stephen Harper, you take on Jack Layton head-on. Both party leaders are travelling to Quebec today to shore up support in a province that is shaping up to be this election’s kingmaker.

Follow the leaders: Day 32 
How do you stem a surging NDP with less than a week before Canadians head to the polls? If you’re Conservative Stephen Harper, you take on Jack Layton head-on. Both party leaders are travelling to Quebec today to shore up support in a province that is shaping up to be this election’s kingmaker.

Fed-up voters fuelling NDP’s rise: pollsters The sudden rise of the NDP in this federal election has its roots in the same anti-incumbency vote that swept populist politicians like Toronto’s Rob Ford and Calgary’s Naheed Nenshi into power in municipal elections last year, analysts say.NDP makes ‘astonishing’ move ahead of Liberals: poll The NDP has steamrollered over the Liberal party to land in second place nationally behind the front-running Conservatives, results of a new poll suggest.Terence Corcoran: Just a smiling Jack-in-the-box How many Canadians actually want to turn over a major power role in Ottawa to one of the most off-the-wall grandstanding left-wingnuts of our time — an opportunistic word machine who couldn’t get himself elected mayor of Toronto?

Fed-up voters fuelling NDP’s rise: pollsters
The sudden rise of the NDP in this federal election has its roots in the same anti-incumbency vote that swept populist politicians like Toronto’s Rob Ford and Calgary’s Naheed Nenshi into power in municipal elections last year, analysts say.

NDP makes ‘astonishing’ move ahead of Liberals: poll
The NDP has steamrollered over the Liberal party to land in second place nationally behind the front-running Conservatives, results of a new poll suggest.

Terence Corcoran: Just a smiling Jack-in-the-box
How many Canadians actually want to turn over a major power role in Ottawa to one of the most off-the-wall grandstanding left-wingnuts of our time — an opportunistic word machine who couldn’t get himself elected mayor of Toronto?

Political Donations: How parties pay the rent Where there’s politics, money is never far behind. In the lead-up to the spring election, federal parties have been busy beefing up their war chests — raising a collective $33-million in the past year alone.Here, the Post‘s Tamsin McMahon analyzes more than 560,000 individual donations of more than $200 given to all parties between 2007 and 2010 to discover where the money comes from and who gives the most. (Political parties are not required to identify the source of donations under $200.)When it comes to opening their wallets to federal politicians, Quebec voters are second only to Newfoundlanders for donating the least.Newfoundland’s low donations are explained through the province’s historically low voter turnout and poverty, which has kept voters both from getting excited about federal elections and writing cheques to parties. It is a different story in Quebec, where the voters gave a mere $1.73 per person on average even as wealthy ridings such as Montreal’s Westmount Ville-Marie made up some of the country’s most generous donors.

Political Donations: How parties pay the rent
Where there’s politics, money is never far behind. In the lead-up to the spring election, federal parties have been busy beefing up their war chests — raising a collective $33-million in the past year alone.

Here, the Post‘s Tamsin McMahon analyzes more than 560,000 individual donations of more than $200 given to all parties between 2007 and 2010 to discover where the money comes from and who gives the most. (Political parties are not required to identify the source of donations under $200.)

When it comes to opening their wallets to federal politicians, Quebec voters are second only to Newfoundlanders for donating the least.

Newfoundland’s low donations are explained through the province’s historically low voter turnout and poverty, which has kept voters both from getting excited about federal elections and writing cheques to parties. It is a different story in Quebec, where the voters gave a mere $1.73 per person on average even as wealthy ridings such as Montreal’s Westmount Ville-Marie made up some of the country’s most generous donors.

The best ‘lets get out the youth vote’ videos
Youth groups and organizers have had a larger presence than ever this election. With advance polling stations opening this weekend, YouTube videos have been cropping up in hopes of encouraging youth to exercise their democratic rights.

Follow the Leaders: Day 27 on the trail It’s the day before advance polls open for the long weekend and party leaders know they’ve got to make an impression on the ground. Again, you’ll find them concentrated in the east, with Stephen Harper making a foray into the Maritimes and Michael Ignatieff kicking around Montreal. Can they capture voter attention before heading into Easter Weekend?NDP surge to the lead in Quebec: poll Jack Layton’s New Democratic Party has surged past Gilles Duceppe’s faltering Bloc Quebecois and is now in first place in Quebec, according to an Ekos public opinion poll released exclusively to iPolitics. The poll, conducted earlier this week, found the New Democrats have jumped 10 percentage points since the eve of the leaders debate to 31.1% while the Bloc has dropped like a rock by 7.4 percentage points to 23.7%Ignatieff says Liberals ‘clear’ choice for Quebecers  Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff said Thursday that Quebecers are “experimenting” about how to replace the Conservative government, but he argued that his party would be the clear choice at the end of the day. “The electoral situation in Quebec is volatile, but a couple of things are clear,” said Ignatieff after a morning round table with representatives of Quebec’s artistic community in Montreal.Harper vows not to reopen abortion debate as prime minister Stephen Harper has vowed that a Conservative government will never endorse anti-abortion legislation while he is in power, but he refused to disclose his personal view on abortion. The Conservatives continued to distance themselves Thursday from remarks by Saskatchewan incumbent MP Brad Trost, who said the Tories have decided to “defund” the International Planned Parenthood Federation, an organization that provides abortions around the world.

Follow the Leaders: Day 27 on the trail
It’s the day before advance polls open for the long weekend and party leaders know they’ve got to make an impression on the ground. Again, you’ll find them concentrated in the east, with Stephen Harper making a foray into the Maritimes and Michael Ignatieff kicking around Montreal. Can they capture voter attention before heading into Easter Weekend?

NDP surge to the lead in Quebec: poll
Jack Layton’s New Democratic Party has surged past Gilles Duceppe’s faltering Bloc Quebecois and is now in first place in Quebec, according to an Ekos public opinion poll released exclusively to iPolitics. The poll, conducted earlier this week, found the New Democrats have jumped 10 percentage points since the eve of the leaders debate to 31.1% while the Bloc has dropped like a rock by 7.4 percentage points to 23.7%

Ignatieff says Liberals ‘clear’ choice for Quebecers
 Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff said Thursday that Quebecers are “experimenting” about how to replace the Conservative government, but he argued that his party would be the clear choice at the end of the day. “The electoral situation in Quebec is volatile, but a couple of things are clear,” said Ignatieff after a morning round table with representatives of Quebec’s artistic community in Montreal.

Harper vows not to reopen abortion debate as prime minister
Stephen Harper has vowed that a Conservative government will never endorse anti-abortion legislation while he is in power, but he refused to disclose his personal view on abortion. The Conservatives continued to distance themselves Thursday from remarks by Saskatchewan incumbent MP Brad Trost, who said the Tories have decided to “defund” the International Planned Parenthood Federation, an organization that provides abortions around the world.

"Because he’s the hero Canada deserves, but not the one it needs right now. So we’ll hunt him because he can take it. Because he’s not our hero. He’s a silent guardian, a watchful protector. A dark knight."

"Because he’s the hero Canada deserves, but not the one it needs right now. So we’ll hunt him because he can take it. Because he’s not our hero. He’s a silent guardian, a watchful protector. A dark knight."

(Source: fuckyeahtoronto)