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National Post

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What kind of J. K. Rowling novel might we expect where every character is a Muggle?Book review: The Casual Vacancy confirms that J.K. Rowling does not lose her narrative gifts by stepping outside her usual realm. Stripped of the fantastic, she still draws the reader onward.

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What kind of J. K. Rowling novel might we expect where every character is a Muggle?
Book review: The Casual Vacancy confirms that J.K. Rowling does not lose her narrative gifts by stepping outside her usual realm. Stripped of the fantastic, she still draws the reader onward.

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Book Review: 1982, by Jian Ghomeshi
Ghomeshi’s goofy sense of humour and humility is part of his easy-going charm, and his ability to appeal to a broad audience has made him a household name in Canada. But in his new memoir, titled 1982 after his life-changing 15th year, his avuncular nature is a major hindrance. Illustration by Chloe Cushman

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Book Review: 1982, by Jian Ghomeshi

Ghomeshi’s goofy sense of humour and humility is part of his easy-going charm, and his ability to appeal to a broad audience has made him a household name in Canada. But in his new memoir, titled 1982 after his life-changing 15th year, his avuncular nature is a major hindrance. Illustration by Chloe Cushman

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Open Book: 11/22/63, by Stephen King
A  confession to the reader: Prior to reviewing 11/22/63 I had  never read a Stephen King novel. This was not due to literary snobbery.  Many friends whose judgment I respect admire some of his books. Perhaps  King’s tendency to write long — his latest characteristically weighs in  at 849 pages — has deterred me. But this epic of time travel on the part  of one Jake Epping, a 35-year-old Maine high school teacher who finds  himself transported back to 1958 and spends five years meditating how to  stop Lee Harvey Oswald from assassinating the president, is too curious  a concept to pass by. You can always get my attention on the subject of  Kennedy’s assassination.

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Open Book: 11/22/63, by Stephen King

A  confession to the reader: Prior to reviewing 11/22/63 I had never read a Stephen King novel. This was not due to literary snobbery. Many friends whose judgment I respect admire some of his books. Perhaps King’s tendency to write long — his latest characteristically weighs in at 849 pages — has deterred me. But this epic of time travel on the part of one Jake Epping, a 35-year-old Maine high school teacher who finds himself transported back to 1958 and spends five years meditating how to stop Lee Harvey Oswald from assassinating the president, is too curious a concept to pass by. You can always get my attention on the subject of Kennedy’s assassination.

How The Pale King’s man put David Foster Wallace together again Editor Michael Pietsch on turning 2,500 disorganized pages into the year’s most anticipated novel.Book Review: The Pale King, by David Foster Wallace If you finished reading David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest and thought to yourself, “what that novel really needed was a 500-page digression about taxation,” then The Pale King is for you. Otherwise, it’s worth looking at only as a curiosity of the nascent academic industry of “Wallace Studies.” The book is billed as his last, unfinished novel, but it amounts in the end to a bundle of notes that Wallace might someday have turned into an unfinished novel.(Illustration by Andrew Barr)

How The Pale King’s man put David Foster Wallace together again
Editor Michael Pietsch on turning 2,500 disorganized pages into the year’s most anticipated novel.

Book Review: The Pale King, by David Foster Wallace
If you finished reading David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest and thought to yourself, “what that novel really needed was a 500-page digression about taxation,” then The Pale King is for you. Otherwise, it’s worth looking at only as a curiosity of the nascent academic industry of “Wallace Studies.” The book is billed as his last, unfinished novel, but it amounts in the end to a bundle of notes that Wallace might someday have turned into an unfinished novel.

(Illustration by Andrew Barr)