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National Post

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Santa Monica Beach aglow — Colorful lights and interactive display created by the group of artists Aphidoidea during Glow 2013 on September 29, 2013 at the beach in Santa Monica, California. Glow is an all-night cultural experience featuring original commissions by artists that re-imagine Santa Monica Beach as a playground for thoughtful and participatory temporary artworks. (JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

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'I don’t love women writers enough to teach them': Giller-nominated author and University of Toronto teacher on why he only teaches books by men
David Gilmour has never been afraid to speak his mind. In a 2011 interview with the National Post, he admitted wanting to “beat the living s–t” out of a critic who’d given him a bad review and spoke at length about how much he hated socializing with fellow Canadian authors, whom he labelled “insecure.” His words have finally come back to haunt him. On Wednesday, Hazlitt, an online magazine published by Random House of Canada, posted a story by Emily M. Keeler — who, full disclosure, writes reviews for the Post — about the 63-year-old Gilmour, who spent over a decade working for the CBC as a film critic and arts reporter. In the article, about his bookshelves, Gilmour said, among other things, that “I’m not interested in teaching books by women” and “I don’t love women writers enough to teach them, if you want women writers go down the hall. What I teach is guys. Serious heterosexual guys.” Gilmour, whose latest novel, Extraordinary, was recently longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, tried to explain himself to Books Editor Mark Medley. (Photo: Della Rollins for National Post)

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'I don’t love women writers enough to teach them': Giller-nominated author and University of Toronto teacher on why he only teaches books by men

David Gilmour has never been afraid to speak his mind. In a 2011 interview with the National Post, he admitted wanting to “beat the living s–t” out of a critic who’d given him a bad review and spoke at length about how much he hated socializing with fellow Canadian authors, whom he labelled “insecure.” His words have finally come back to haunt him. On Wednesday, Hazlitt, an online magazine published by Random House of Canada, posted a story by Emily M. Keeler — who, full disclosure, writes reviews for the Post — about the 63-year-old Gilmour, who spent over a decade working for the CBC as a film critic and arts reporter. In the article, about his bookshelves, Gilmour said, among other things, that “I’m not interested in teaching books by women” and “I don’t love women writers enough to teach them, if you want women writers go down the hall. What I teach is guys. Serious heterosexual guys.” Gilmour, whose latest novel, Extraordinary, was recently longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, tried to explain himself to Books Editor Mark Medley. (Photo: Della Rollins for National Post)

nationalpostphotos:

Return of the giant rubber duck — After successful tour of Hong Kong harbour, the Duck reappeared in Taiwan. Local residents gathered to see Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman’s yellow rubber duck at a harbor in the southern Taiwan’s city of Kaohsiung on September 19, 2013. Hofman’s now-famous giant yellow duck found a new temporary home on September 19, this time in Taiwan, but an approaching typhoon could ruffle the inflatable’s feathers.

New Van Gogh painting discovered, had been sold because owner thought it was fake
The first full-size Vincent Van Gogh painting to be discovered in 85 years has been authenticated as a genuine long-lost work of the Dutch master after an odyssey that included lingering for six decades in the attic of a Norwegian industrialist who had been told it was a fake.

“Sunset at Montmajour” depicts a dry landscape of twisting oak trees, bushes and sky, and it was done during the period when Van Gogh was increasingly adopting the thick brush strokes that became typical of his work in the final years of his short life, experts at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam said Monday.

It can be dated to the exact day it was painted because Vincent described it in a letter to his brother, Theo, and said he had painted it the previous day – July 4, 1888.

“At sunset I was on a stony heath where very small, twisted oaks grow, in the background a ruin on the hill and wheat fields in the valley,” Van Gogh wrote. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

New Van Gogh painting discovered, had been sold because owner thought it was fake

The first full-size Vincent Van Gogh painting to be discovered in 85 years has been authenticated as a genuine long-lost work of the Dutch master after an odyssey that included lingering for six decades in the attic of a Norwegian industrialist who had been told it was a fake.

“Sunset at Montmajour” depicts a dry landscape of twisting oak trees, bushes and sky, and it was done during the period when Van Gogh was increasingly adopting the thick brush strokes that became typical of his work in the final years of his short life, experts at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam said Monday.

It can be dated to the exact day it was painted because Vincent described it in a letter to his brother, Theo, and said he had painted it the previous day – July 4, 1888.

“At sunset I was on a stony heath where very small, twisted oaks grow, in the background a ruin on the hill and wheat fields in the valley,” Van Gogh wrote. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Tagged with:  #news  #art  #Vincent Van Gogh  #Van Gogh
Chimp wins $10,000 for tongue-painted work after 37,000 vote in animal art contestA painting by a 37-year-old primate who applies colour with his tongue instead of a brush has been deemed the finest chimpanzee art in the land.Brent, a retired laboratory animal, was the top vote-getter in an online chimp art contest organized by the Humane Society of the United States, which announced the results Thursday. He won $10,000 for the Chimp Haven sanctuary in northwest Louisiana.A Chimp Haven spokeswoman said Brent was unavailable for comment Thursday. “I think he’s asleep,” Ashley Gordon said. (Photos: AP Photo/Humane Society of The United States; AP Photo/Chimp Haven, Inc.)

Chimp wins $10,000 for tongue-painted work after 37,000 vote in animal art contest
A painting by a 37-year-old primate who applies colour with his tongue instead of a brush has been deemed the finest chimpanzee art in the land.

Brent, a retired laboratory animal, was the top vote-getter in an online chimp art contest organized by the Humane Society of the United States, which announced the results Thursday. He won $10,000 for the Chimp Haven sanctuary in northwest Louisiana.

A Chimp Haven spokeswoman said Brent was unavailable for comment Thursday. “I think he’s asleep,” Ashley Gordon said. (Photos: AP Photo/Humane Society of The United States; AP Photo/Chimp Haven, Inc.)

Tagged with:  #chimpanzee  #animals  #art

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The passion of tango — Passion was on full display during the Stage Tango competition of the Tango World Championship in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on August 27, 2013. (Photos by DANIEL GARCIA/AFP/Getty Images)

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The Russian artist who painted Putin and Medvedev in women’s underwear has fled the country

Konstantin Altunin is planning to request asylum in France after Russian authorities shut down an exhibition of his work in St. Petersburg. MORE HERE: natpo.st/17hfiWY

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In the pattern — People walk over the installation ‘test pattern’ (100m version) by Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda at the Ruhrtriennale music and arts festival in the Kraftzentrale in Duisburg, Germany, Friday, Aug. 23 2013. (AP Photo/dpa, Caroline Seidel)

nationalpostphotos:

In the pattern — People walk over the installation ‘test pattern’ (100m version) by Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda at the Ruhrtriennale music and arts festival in the Kraftzentrale in Duisburg, Germany, Friday, Aug. 23 2013. (AP Photo/dpa, Caroline Seidel)

Senior citizen behind botched Spanish fresco has last laugh as painting becomes lucrative hit for small townA year ago, Cecilia Gimenez’s botched attempt to restore a fresco of Christ inspired ridicule and references to monkeys. Now, the 81-year-old Spanish would-be artist is having the last laugh.The disfigured fresco has drawn more than 40,000 visitors and raised more than 50,000 euros for a local charity in the town of Borja since gaining worldwide attention. It has spurred the town to put the likeness on merchandise it hopes will sell for years to come. And Gimenez has even had her own art exhibit, with two dozen of her other works showing through Aug. 24 in the town of 5,000. (Photo: Centro de estudios Borjanos)

Senior citizen behind botched Spanish fresco has last laugh as painting becomes lucrative hit for small town
A year ago, Cecilia Gimenez’s botched attempt to restore a fresco of Christ inspired ridicule and references to monkeys. Now, the 81-year-old Spanish would-be artist is having the last laugh.

The disfigured fresco has drawn more than 40,000 visitors and raised more than 50,000 euros for a local charity in the town of Borja since gaining worldwide attention. It has spurred the town to put the likeness on merchandise it hopes will sell for years to come. And Gimenez has even had her own art exhibit, with two dozen of her other works showing through Aug. 24 in the town of 5,000. (Photo: Centro de estudios Borjanos)

nationalpostphotos:

Shakespeare’s theatre — Audience members watch a production of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ in Shakespeare’s Globe theatre on the Southbank of the River Thames on July 16, 2013 in London, England. (Photos by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

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Alex Colville, Canada’s ‘painter laureate,’ dead at age 92
Celebrated painter Alex Colville, whose meticulously crafted scenes of everyday life established him as one of Canada’s most well-known modern artists, has died at the age of 92.

His son, Graham„ said his father passed away Tuesday at his home in Wolfville, N.S.

A painter, engraver, sketch artist and muralist, Colville earned a reputation for crafting tranquil compositions that focused on routine moments of family life and featured landscapes, animals and the sea.

postarcadenp:

Why video games will never have their “Citizen Kane moment”
By Chad Sapieha 
There is always a hope in an author or director or musician’s mind that what they’re creating might stand the test of time, that it may continue to draw audiences for decades – perhaps even centuries – into the future, long after their deaths.
Abbey Road isn’t doomed to obscurity because vinyl records have been largely replaced by digital recordings, Hamlet didn’t disappear when The Globe theatre burned down, and as long as classic movie channels and on demand services exist people will be able to watch Orson Welles as Citizen Kane.
But the specific technological requirements attached to video games – and particularly newer titles – work to erase this possibility in the realm of interactive entertainment. They’re born with an expiry date.
I’d go so far as to suggest that, over time, many games released today will end up sharing more in common with stage productions than books or movies or music. They will be appreciated in the moment, then eventually disappear. People will write about and record their experiences, and those words and videos will continue on to posterity, acting as the primary means by which they are remembered by gamers of the future.
http://bit.ly/186Z3Jw

postarcadenp:

Why video games will never have their “Citizen Kane moment”

By Chad Sapieha 

There is always a hope in an author or director or musician’s mind that what they’re creating might stand the test of time, that it may continue to draw audiences for decades – perhaps even centuries – into the future, long after their deaths.

Abbey Road isn’t doomed to obscurity because vinyl records have been largely replaced by digital recordings, Hamlet didn’t disappear when The Globe theatre burned down, and as long as classic movie channels and on demand services exist people will be able to watch Orson Welles as Citizen Kane.

But the specific technological requirements attached to video games – and particularly newer titles – work to erase this possibility in the realm of interactive entertainment. They’re born with an expiry date.

I’d go so far as to suggest that, over time, many games released today will end up sharing more in common with stage productions than books or movies or music. They will be appreciated in the moment, then eventually disappear. People will write about and record their experiences, and those words and videos will continue on to posterity, acting as the primary means by which they are remembered by gamers of the future.

http://bit.ly/186Z3Jw

Tagged with:  #gaming  #video games  #technology  #art
postarcadenp:

Finding poetry in motion in the Road Not Taken
By Matthew O’Mara
Road Not Taken is poetry is motion, quite literally.
Developed by Spry Fox, Road Not Taken is a puzzle game about life and loss, that features randomly generated levels and permadeath. Similar to games like Shiren the Wanderer, players move along a grid attempting to traverse forest after forest as the game’s story unfolds.
Invoking the famous poem by Robert Frost, the title speaks volumes about what players can expect in a game of isolation and difficult choices. Something happened a long time ago in Road Not Taken and the player has to take a road less travelled in Spry Fox’s game to uncover the truth.
But as David Edery, co-founder of Spry Fox — and an English major by training — explained, Mr. Frost’s oft-quoted poem is one of the most misunderstood poems in the history of American poetry.
“The first thing I should say is that it’s pretty clear this poem means different things to different people,” Mr. Edery said.
“It’s been pretty interesting watching debates flare up about the meaning of the poem as a result of our game’s announcement. People are having arguments that quickly segue in directions that have nothing to do with Spry Fox or this game.”
http://bit.ly/13O7kAe

postarcadenp:

Finding poetry in motion in the Road Not Taken

By Matthew O’Mara

Road Not Taken is poetry is motion, quite literally.

Developed by Spry Fox, Road Not Taken is a puzzle game about life and loss, that features randomly generated levels and permadeath. Similar to games like Shiren the Wanderer, players move along a grid attempting to traverse forest after forest as the game’s story unfolds.

Invoking the famous poem by Robert Frost, the title speaks volumes about what players can expect in a game of isolation and difficult choices. Something happened a long time ago in Road Not Taken and the player has to take a road less travelled in Spry Fox’s game to uncover the truth.

But as David Edery, co-founder of Spry Fox — and an English major by training — explained, Mr. Frost’s oft-quoted poem is one of the most misunderstood poems in the history of American poetry.

“The first thing I should say is that it’s pretty clear this poem means different things to different people,” Mr. Edery said.

“It’s been pretty interesting watching debates flare up about the meaning of the poem as a result of our game’s announcement. People are having arguments that quickly segue in directions that have nothing to do with Spry Fox or this game.”

http://bit.ly/13O7kAe

nparts:

Exhibition curated from David Bowie’s personal archive to make first touring stop at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto this fall
“David Bowie is” will feature more than 300 objects from Bowie’s own personal archive, according to a press release issued by the AGO, including diary entries, more than 50 costumes and pictures of Bowie taken by star photographer Helmut Newton. More here: natpo.st/1bsdk33

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Rochelle Campbell of Washington places human bones, crafted by students, artists and activists, in place on the lawn of the National Mall in Washington Saturday, June 8, 2013, during a massive installation called One Million Bones, symbolic of a mass grave and a visible petition for bold action towards an end to genocide and mass atrocities. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

nationalpostphotos:

Rochelle Campbell of Washington places human bones, crafted by students, artists and activists, in place on the lawn of the National Mall in Washington Saturday, June 8, 2013, during a massive installation called One Million Bones, symbolic of a mass grave and a visible petition for bold action towards an end to genocide and mass atrocities. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)