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Could the risk of becoming an alcoholic be written into our DNA?A new U.K. study hints that the risk of becoming addicted to alcohol may be linked to an “excessive drinking” gene scientists have recently discovered.[Dmitry Kostyukov/AFP/Getty Images files]

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Could the risk of becoming an alcoholic be written into our DNA?
A new U.K. study hints that the risk of becoming addicted to alcohol may be linked to an “excessive drinking” gene scientists have recently discovered.
[Dmitry Kostyukov/AFP/Getty Images files]

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One in 20 Canadians is a food addict, Newfoundland researchers findResearchers from Newfoundland’s Memorial University say that 7% of women in their study, and three per cent of males — 5% of the population overall — met diagnostic criteria for food addiction, described by senior author Guang Sun as “compulsive overeating in harmful and unhealthy ways.” And although the condition is deemed controversial, the Memorial team says there is mounting evidence that some foods may activate the brain’s reward system in vulnerable people in ways similar to cocaine or alcohol.[Photo credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images files]

npostlife:

One in 20 Canadians is a food addict, Newfoundland researchers find
Researchers from Newfoundland’s Memorial University say that 7% of women in their study, and three per cent of males — 5% of the population overall — met diagnostic criteria for food addiction, described by senior author Guang Sun as “compulsive overeating in harmful and unhealthy ways.” And although the condition is deemed controversial, the Memorial team says there is mounting evidence that some foods may activate the brain’s reward system in vulnerable people in ways similar to cocaine or alcohol.
[Photo credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images files]

Tagged with:  #news  #food  #health  #food addiction  #addiction
Man’s porn addiction is Apple’s fault, law suit claimsChris Sevier has a porn addiction. Fine. However he claims that it’s the fault of Apple.The 36-year-old lawyer and amateur model from Tennessee claims to have lost his wife and son over his addiction. According to International Business Times, Mr. Sevier has filed a law suit against Apple claiming that the company “failed to install any filter in its devices to prevent his affliction [calling the company]  a ‘silent poisoner’ responsible for the proliferation of ‘arousal addiction, sex trafficking, prostitution and countless numbers of destroyed lives.” Apparently Mr. Sevier became addicted when he accidentally typed “uck” instead of “ace” when logging into his Facebook site. (Photo: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg)

Man’s porn addiction is Apple’s fault, law suit claims
Chris Sevier has a porn addiction. Fine. However he claims that it’s the fault of Apple.

The 36-year-old lawyer and amateur model from Tennessee claims to have lost his wife and son over his addiction. According to International Business Times, Mr. Sevier has filed a law suit against Apple claiming that the company “failed to install any filter in its devices to prevent his affliction [calling the company]  a ‘silent poisoner’ responsible for the proliferation of ‘arousal addiction, sex trafficking, prostitution and countless numbers of destroyed lives.” 

Apparently Mr. Sevier became addicted when he accidentally typed “uck” instead of “ace” when logging into his Facebook site. (Photo: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg)

Tagged with:  #news  #Apple  #addiction  #legal system
npostlife:

That little bit of wine or occasional beer to show children proper drinking behaviour may not be such as great idea after allAn EU report on childhood and adolescence says that parents who give young children alcohol in an attempt to teach them about responsible drinking may be doing more harm than good.[Photo credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images files]

npostlife:

That little bit of wine or occasional beer to show children proper drinking behaviour may not be such as great idea after all
An EU report on childhood and adolescence says that parents who give young children alcohol in an attempt to teach them about responsible drinking may be doing more harm than good.
[Photo credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images files]

Tagged with:  #news  #health  #alcohol  #alcoholism  #addiction
Internet addiction has same effect as cocaine on brains: studyThis is your brain on the Internet: Messed up where there should be connections for making decisions and having normal emotions.Results of a new study suggest people who cannot control, cut back or stop their use of the Internet have abnormal white matter structure in the brain similar to what is seen in cocaine and crystal-meth addicts.According to the study’s authors, as the number of people logging onto cyberspace soars, “Internet addiction disorder” — which is poised to enter the official lexicon of psychiatric illnesses — “is becoming a serious mental-health issue around the world.”The disorder, as described in the study published this week in the journal PLoS One, is defined as “problematic” or pathological computer use that can cause “marked distress” and interfere with school, work, family and social relationships.For their study, led by Hao Lei of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan, researchers scanned the brains of 17 teens and young adults, aged 14 to 24, with Internet addiction and 16 healthy “controls” of similar age.People were classified as suffering from Internet addiction disorder, or IAD, based on a questionnaire that included the following: Do you feel preoccupied with the Internet? Do you stay online longer than originally intended? Do you feel restless, moody, depressed or irritable when attempting to cut down or stop Internet use?

Internet addiction has same effect as cocaine on brains: study
This is your brain on the Internet: Messed up where there should be connections for making decisions and having normal emotions.

Results of a new study suggest people who cannot control, cut back or stop their use of the Internet have abnormal white matter structure in the brain similar to what is seen in cocaine and crystal-meth addicts.

According to the study’s authors, as the number of people logging onto cyberspace soars, “Internet addiction disorder” — which is poised to enter the official lexicon of psychiatric illnesses — “is becoming a serious mental-health issue around the world.”

The disorder, as described in the study published this week in the journal PLoS One, is defined as “problematic” or pathological computer use that can cause “marked distress” and interfere with school, work, family and social relationships.

For their study, led by Hao Lei of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan, researchers scanned the brains of 17 teens and young adults, aged 14 to 24, with Internet addiction and 16 healthy “controls” of similar age.

People were classified as suffering from Internet addiction disorder, or IAD, based on a questionnaire that included the following: Do you feel preoccupied with the Internet? Do you stay online longer than originally intended? Do you feel restless, moody, depressed or irritable when attempting to cut down or stop Internet use?

Tagged with:  #news  #Tumblr  #internet  #addiction  #drugs  #science
The selling of OxyContinWhile opioids had long been reserved primarily for terminal cancer patients, ads in medical journals touted OxyContin — with up to twice the potency of morphine — as a safer alternative to even Aspirin and Tylenol and good for anyone who needed pain relief for “several days” or more.It was not long before OxyContin was being widely prescribed in the Vancouver area, notes Dr. Thomas Perry, a local physician-pharmacologist, in an affidavit filed in a Nova Scoita class-action lawsuit against Purdue. Sales accelerated across the country, soaring from $3-million in 1998 to $243-million last year, according to IMS-Brogan, which tracks drug trends.“The biggest surprise for us in Canada at the time was how fast it took off,” said Dwain May, a former Purdue executive in Alberta.“This campaign was amazingly successful,” said Dr. Mel Kahan, a University of Toronto addiction expert. “It was probably the most successful marketing campaign in history as far as I know for any class of drug.”What happened next is now common knowledge, though the full extent of the “Hillbilly heroin’s” dark side has only recently become apparent. Addiction to the “low-abuse” drug — and other, similar opioid painkillers — has reached near-epidemic proportions, with 140 people a year in Ontario alone dying from overdoses related to the drug, more than are killed in drowning mishaps, according to the province’s coroner. Victims include street users, people taking what their doctor prescribed and those getting OxyContin from both legal and underground sources. (Photo: Jeff Siner/Chartlotte Observer)

The selling of OxyContin
While opioids had long been reserved primarily for terminal cancer patients, ads in medical journals touted OxyContin — with up to twice the potency of morphine — as a safer alternative to even Aspirin and Tylenol and good for anyone who needed pain relief for “several days” or more.

It was not long before OxyContin was being widely prescribed in the Vancouver area, notes Dr. Thomas Perry, a local physician-pharmacologist, in an affidavit filed in a Nova Scoita class-action lawsuit against Purdue. Sales accelerated across the country, soaring from $3-million in 1998 to $243-million last year, according to IMS-Brogan, which tracks drug trends.

“The biggest surprise for us in Canada at the time was how fast it took off,” said Dwain May, a former Purdue executive in Alberta.

“This campaign was amazingly successful,” said Dr. Mel Kahan, a University of Toronto addiction expert. “It was probably the most successful marketing campaign in history as far as I know for any class of drug.”

What happened next is now common knowledge, though the full extent of the “Hillbilly heroin’s” dark side has only recently become apparent. Addiction to the “low-abuse” drug — and other, similar opioid painkillers — has reached near-epidemic proportions, with 140 people a year in Ontario alone dying from overdoses related to the drug, more than are killed in drowning mishaps, according to the province’s coroner. Victims include street users, people taking what their doctor prescribed and those getting OxyContin from both legal and underground sources. (Photo: Jeff Siner/Chartlotte Observer)

Dave Bidini: It’s not always the best game you can nameThis summer, two hockey players died: a record body count. People will tell you that these deaths were the result of fighting and concussions, and the damage suffered while playing a savage sport. All of this is true, but both players were also emotionally troubled, suffering bleak endings to a kind of life that many of us hold in wonder. We may view the terrible demise of Derek Boogaard, the New York Rangers enforcer who died in May, and Rick Rypien, the recent Vancouver Canuck and intended Winnipeg Jet who died earlier this week, as fall from graces. But this is to assume that grace exists — or is encouraged to exist — in a culture that is rarely blamed whenever a player slips off the Earth. How many songs, poems, open-line laments, sports-talk post-mortems or morning columns must we voice before we study that culture for what it really is? How many stories about dead hockey players do we have to tell before they stop dying? (Don Healy/Regina Leader-Post)

Dave Bidini: It’s not always the best game you can name
This summer, two hockey players died: a record body count. People will tell you that these deaths were the result of fighting and concussions, and the damage suffered while playing a savage sport. All of this is true, but both players were also emotionally troubled, suffering bleak endings to a kind of life that many of us hold in wonder. We may view the terrible demise of Derek Boogaard, the New York Rangers enforcer who died in May, and Rick Rypien, the recent Vancouver Canuck and intended Winnipeg Jet who died earlier this week, as fall from graces. But this is to assume that grace exists — or is encouraged to exist — in a culture that is rarely blamed whenever a player slips off the Earth. How many songs, poems, open-line laments, sports-talk post-mortems or morning columns must we voice before we study that culture for what it really is? How many stories about dead hockey players do we have to tell before they stop dying? (Don Healy/Regina Leader-Post)

Barbara Kay: Insite clinic enables drug users and helps spread human misery Insite, in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside is the only “safe-injection site” (SIS) in North America where addicts can legally inject hard drugs under medical supervision. If the Supreme Court, now in deliberation, rules the federal government has no right to shut it down, Insite clones will spring up all over Canada.David Berry: Insite’s success causes problems for morality-based opposition Before the Supreme Court case to decide Insite’s future began, government lawyers requested that the court ignore the piles of evidence that suggest the inexplicably embattled facility does exactly what it purports to do: reduce overdoses, stop the spread of disease, encourage rehabilitation — you know, generally just save lives.Photo: A heroin user shoots up in alley in Vancouver’s notoriously drug-blighted Downtown Eastside, where Insite — Canada’s only safe-injection site — is located. (Ian Smith/Postmedia News)

Barbara Kay: Insite clinic enables drug users and helps spread human misery
Insite, in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside is the only “safe-injection site” (SIS) in North America where addicts can legally inject hard drugs under medical supervision. If the Supreme Court, now in deliberation, rules the federal government has no right to shut it down, Insite clones will spring up all over Canada.

David Berry: Insite’s success causes problems for morality-based opposition
Before the Supreme Court case to decide Insite’s future began, government lawyers requested that the court ignore the piles of evidence that suggest the inexplicably embattled facility does exactly what it purports to do: reduce overdoses, stop the spread of disease, encourage rehabilitation — you know, generally just save lives.

Photo: A heroin user shoots up in alley in Vancouver’s notoriously drug-blighted Downtown Eastside, where Insite — Canada’s only safe-injection site — is located. (Ian Smith/Postmedia News)

Confessions of a book hoarderThe first thing people usually say to me, upon entering my home for the first time, is that I own a lot of books. They are wrong, of course. I am rather ashamed at the size of my collection, considering I studied English literature in university and now pretty much write about books for a living. Between my girlfriend and I, there are probably between 1,000 and 1,250 books in our apartment, a number I consider rather paltry. Ideally, I’d like to double that number once we buy our first home — we currently rent — and I’m no longer faced with the prospect of hauling countless boxes of books between addresses.I’d last attempted to cull my collection about a year ago, when I carried about 50 books from my shelves to a spare room in the basement; I intended to get rid of them, but they, of course, went nowhere. This time, I hoped to rid myself of a quarter of my books. Nothing so ridiculous happened, of course, but the fact that I found about a half dozen copies of Joseph Boyden’s Through Black Spruce — which I still have not read — and four copies of Lucy Knisley’s graphic novel French Milk — ditto — was proof enough that my addiction had crossed the line into a dark, uncharted area, where intervention may be necessary. I thought it was also fitting that I found both of my e-readers gathering dust under piles of books.• Are you a book hoarder? Proud of it? Send your stories to mmedley@nationalpost.com

Confessions of a book hoarder
The first thing people usually say to me, upon entering my home for the first time, is that I own a lot of books. They are wrong, of course. I am rather ashamed at the size of my collection, considering I studied English literature in university and now pretty much write about books for a living. Between my girlfriend and I, there are probably between 1,000 and 1,250 books in our apartment, a number I consider rather paltry. Ideally, I’d like to double that number once we buy our first home — we currently rent — and I’m no longer faced with the prospect of hauling countless boxes of books between addresses.

I’d last attempted to cull my collection about a year ago, when I carried about 50 books from my shelves to a spare room in the basement; I intended to get rid of them, but they, of course, went nowhere. This time, I hoped to rid myself of a quarter of my books. Nothing so ridiculous happened, of course, but the fact that I found about a half dozen copies of Joseph Boyden’s Through Black Spruce — which I still have not read — and four copies of Lucy Knisley’s graphic novel French Milk — ditto — was proof enough that my addiction had crossed the line into a dark, uncharted area, where intervention may be necessary. I thought it was also fitting that I found both of my e-readers gathering dust under piles of books.

• Are you a book hoarder? Proud of it? Send your stories to mmedley@nationalpost.com