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National Post

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CATS on cats

After 25 years away from Toronto stages, Andrew Lloyd Webber’s blockbuster Cats returns for a new generation. But cats occupy a very different place in our culture than they did during the show’s first run. Thanks mostly to an Internet culture that prizes documenting everything and staying cloistered indoors, cats have become the true stars of new media, with their habits, quirks and even rich emotional lives documented from literally every angle. In an attempt to bring together these pre- and post-millennium views of cats, the National Post’s David Berry met a few of the cast members of Cats in the green room and watched a selection of cat videos. It turns out that even Cats can’t resist cat videos: natpo.st/10qtASz

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‘I thought he was a doctor’: John Malkovich helps save blood-soaked man’s life on a Toronto streetOn the final day of a cross-Canada train trip, Ohio’s Marilyn Walpole was walking down King St. East with fellow travellers, when, behind her, she heard a slight moan and turned around to see her 77-year-old husband awash in his own blood.“There was blood everywhere on the sidewalk; his face was full of blood, his clothes were soaked in blood … and he was moaning,” said Ms. Walpole, speaking from her home in Defiance, Ohio.Within moments, a bystander had thrown down his cigarette, rushed into the blood-soaked scene and administered the emergency First Aid that may have saved Mr. Walpole’s life. Only later would the couple discover that the bystander was Academy Award-nominated actor John Malkovich.“He really knew what he was doing; that’s why I thought he was a doctor,” said Ms. Walpole. “He had no qualms about getting blood all over him; that would be a real concern for some people.” (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Galit Rodan)

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‘I thought he was a doctor’: John Malkovich helps save blood-soaked man’s life on a Toronto street
On the final day of a cross-Canada train trip, Ohio’s Marilyn Walpole was walking down King St. East with fellow travellers, when, behind her, she heard a slight moan and turned around to see her 77-year-old husband awash in his own blood.

“There was blood everywhere on the sidewalk; his face was full of blood, his clothes were soaked in blood … and he was moaning,” said Ms. Walpole, speaking from her home in Defiance, Ohio.

Within moments, a bystander had thrown down his cigarette, rushed into the blood-soaked scene and administered the emergency First Aid that may have saved Mr. Walpole’s life. Only later would the couple discover that the bystander was Academy Award-nominated actor John Malkovich.

“He really knew what he was doing; that’s why I thought he was a doctor,” said Ms. Walpole. “He had no qualms about getting blood all over him; that would be a real concern for some people.” (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Galit Rodan)

Tagged with:  #news  #John Malkovich  #Toronto  #celebs  #actors
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Pay it Forward: Acting Partners
Melissa Leong asked actors who they’d most like to have play their better half.

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Pay it Forward: Acting Partners

Melissa Leong asked actors who they’d most like to have play their better half.

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The L.A. Complex is sexy, smart and Canadian madeThe faded sign out front of the Hollywood hotel says “Deluxe Suites,” although truth be told the rooms stretch the boundaries of that adjective. In the courtyard, a cleaning crew pushes mops around the deck of the pool area, as a couple of inflatable chairs gently jostle on top of the sparkling surface. There was a party here the night before, I’m told, which could explain why the faded, weathered building is so quiet on a sunny, crisp morning.Except, the real explanation is that this is not a hotel. It’s a television set, albeit a huge one, constructed on a lot in midtown Toronto that backs onto the Don River Valley. And the party, evidence of which is still being cleaned up, was a scene in The L.A. Complex. How to film a television series about a group of aspiring actors and artists living in one of the pay-by-the-month hotels in the outer reaches of Los Angeles? First, build the hotel. Next, add some aspiring actors.“It’s a little too real,” says Jewel Staite, sitting in her room at the hotel, which is to say it is the room occupied by Raquel Monaghan, her character on the show. “This set reminds me of what it’s like to be out of work.”It’s impossible to get away from the life-imitating-art angle of The L.A. Complex, since most of the cast has spent time doing exactly what it is they are trying to portray: living in L.A., going to auditions and waiting tables in between. “A bunch of us were out for dinner the other night, and there was a mix-up with the waitress, and it led to this debate about the right order of doing things for a table. Everyone had an opinion,” says Staite, “because everyone had done it.”

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The L.A. Complex is sexy, smart and Canadian made
The faded sign out front of the Hollywood hotel says “Deluxe Suites,” although truth be told the rooms stretch the boundaries of that adjective. In the courtyard, a cleaning crew pushes mops around the deck of the pool area, as a couple of inflatable chairs gently jostle on top of the sparkling surface. There was a party here the night before, I’m told, which could explain why the faded, weathered building is so quiet on a sunny, crisp morning.

Except, the real explanation is that this is not a hotel. It’s a television set, albeit a huge one, constructed on a lot in midtown Toronto that backs onto the Don River Valley. And the party, evidence of which is still being cleaned up, was a scene in The L.A. Complex. How to film a television series about a group of aspiring actors and artists living in one of the pay-by-the-month hotels in the outer reaches of Los Angeles? First, build the hotel. Next, add some aspiring actors.

“It’s a little too real,” says Jewel Staite, sitting in her room at the hotel, which is to say it is the room occupied by Raquel Monaghan, her character on the show. “This set reminds me of what it’s like to be out of work.”

It’s impossible to get away from the life-imitating-art angle of The L.A. Complex, since most of the cast has spent time doing exactly what it is they are trying to portray: living in L.A., going to auditions and waiting tables in between. “A bunch of us were out for dinner the other night, and there was a mix-up with the waitress, and it led to this debate about the right order of doing things for a table. Everyone had an opinion,” says Staite, “because everyone had done it.”

Photos: Afghan’s renew film industry During the austere Taliban rule from 1996-2001, television, music and film were banned. Amid escalating violence across Afghanistan in the tenth year of fighting in the NATO-led war, fear of the Taliban is ever-present across many sectors of society. The Afghan film industry says suicide attacks and bombs threaten the livelihood of its cinema just as much as its lack of quality equipment. (Ahmad Masood/Reuters)

Photos: Afghan’s renew film industry
During the austere Taliban rule from 1996-2001, television, music and film were banned. Amid escalating violence across Afghanistan in the tenth year of fighting in the NATO-led war, fear of the Taliban is ever-present across many sectors of society. The Afghan film industry says suicide attacks and bombs threaten the livelihood of its cinema just as much as its lack of quality equipment. (Ahmad Masood/Reuters)

Tagged with:  #news  #Afghanistan  #film  #movies  #Taliban  #cinema  #actors