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National Post

Praise Lesus! Vatican recalls thousands of medals over holy typo in Christ’s name
In a bid to commemorate Pope Francis’ first year as Catholic leader, the Vatican commissioned the Italian mint to create a small medallion marking the occasion.
One small problem: Jesus’ name is misspelled.
The coin features the Pope’s motto, a phrase from the Bible which he says inspired him to follow God. They read:
“Vidit ergo Jesus publicanum et quia miserando antque eligendo vidit, ait illi sequere me,” in Latin. In English, that means “Jesus, therefore, saw the tax collector, and because he saw by having mercy and by choosing, He said to him, ‘Follow me.”
Unfortunately, the coin reads:  ”Vidit ergo Lesus publicanum et quia miserando antque eligendo vidit, ait illi sequere me.” (Photo: Handout)

Praise Lesus! Vatican recalls thousands of medals over holy typo in Christ’s name

In a bid to commemorate Pope Francis’ first year as Catholic leader, the Vatican commissioned the Italian mint to create a small medallion marking the occasion.

One small problem: Jesus’ name is misspelled.

The coin features the Pope’s motto, a phrase from the Bible which he says inspired him to follow God. They read:

“Vidit ergo Jesus publicanum et quia miserando antque eligendo vidit, ait illi sequere me,” in Latin. In English, that means “Jesus, therefore, saw the tax collector, and because he saw by having mercy and by choosing, He said to him, ‘Follow me.”

Unfortunately, the coin reads:  ”Vidit ergo Lesus publicanum et quia miserando antque eligendo vidit, ait illi sequere me.” (Photo: Handout)

Tagged with:  #news  #Vatican  #Jesus  #coins  #Pope Francis

nationalpostphotos:

Thousands of faithful filled St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican, Tuesday, March 19, 2013 for the new pope’s inauguration. Pope Francis officially began his ministry as the 266th pope on Tuesday in an installation Mass simplified to suit his style, but still grand enough to draw princes, presidents, rabbis, muftis and thousands of ordinary people to St. Peter’s Square to witness the inauguration of the first pope from the New World.

Pope Benedict XVI recalls ‘joy’ of papacy in emotional sendoff as 150,000 gather for his final public audience
Pope Benedict XVI basked in an emotional sendoff Wednesday from a massive crowd at his final general audience in St. Peter’s Square, recalling moments of “joy and light” during his papacy but also times of difficulty when “it seemed like the Lord was sleeping.”

An estimated 150,000 people, many toting banners saying “Grazie!” (“Thank you!”), jammed the piazza to bid Benedict farewell and hear his final speech as pontiff. In this appointment – which he has kept each week for eight years to teach the world about the Catholic faith – Benedict gave deep thanks to his flock for respecting his decision to retire. (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet would bring ‘strong sense of collegiality’ as popeMere hours after Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation Monday, Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet became one of the most talked about candidates to replace him as leader of the world’s one billion Catholics.If elected by his 120 or so peers in the Vatican next month, the hockey-playing kid from Abitibi, Que., would make history not just as the first Canadian pope, or even the first from North America, but the first ever appointed from outside Europe — a move observers are urging the church to make as it looks to minister to growing ranks of believers in the global south and remain relevant to the rest of the world.“Cardinal Ouellet is a man who has beautiful spiritual qualities,”Archbishop of Quebec, Gérald Cyprien Lacroix, said. “He’s a man with deep spiritual convictions and that is certainly very, very important.”

Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet would bring ‘strong sense of collegiality’ as pope
Mere hours after Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation Monday, Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet became one of the most talked about candidates to replace him as leader of the world’s one billion Catholics.

If elected by his 120 or so peers in the Vatican next month, the hockey-playing kid from Abitibi, Que., would make history not just as the first Canadian pope, or even the first from North America, but the first ever appointed from outside Europe — a move observers are urging the church to make as it looks to minister to growing ranks of believers in the global south and remain relevant to the rest of the world.

“Cardinal Ouellet is a man who has beautiful spiritual qualities,”Archbishop of Quebec, Gérald Cyprien Lacroix, said. “He’s a man with deep spiritual convictions and that is certainly very, very important.”

Canadian cardinal who said being pope ‘would be a nightmare’ a frontrunner to replace BenedictPope Benedict XVI’s shock resignation could open the door for the Church’s first non-European leader, with a Canadian and an Argentinean considered among the leading candidates to become the next pope.Cardinal Marc Ouellet, formerly the archbishop of Quebec City, has the best odds of replacing Pope Benedict XVI according to an Irish betting site, at 11 to 4.Cardinal Ouellet, 68, is the head of the Congregation for Bishops, essentially the Vatican’s top staff director. He was once quoted saying being the pope “would be a nightmare.”He also told Quebec City’s Le Soleil newspaper that a pope’s duties “are perhaps not very enviable” adding a pope’s responsibilities are “crushing.” (AFP PHOTO/GETTY / ALBERTO PIZZOLI)

Canadian cardinal who said being pope ‘would be a nightmare’ a frontrunner to replace Benedict
Pope Benedict XVI’s shock resignation could open the door for the Church’s first non-European leader, with a Canadian and an Argentinean considered among the leading candidates to become the next pope.

Cardinal Marc Ouellet, formerly the archbishop of Quebec City, has the best odds of replacing Pope Benedict XVI according to an Irish betting site, at 11 to 4.

Cardinal Ouellet, 68, is the head of the Congregation for Bishops, essentially the Vatican’s top staff director. He was once quoted saying being the pope “would be a nightmare.”

He also told Quebec City’s Le Soleil newspaper that a pope’s duties “are perhaps not very enviable” adding a pope’s responsibilities are “crushing.” (AFP PHOTO/GETTY / ALBERTO PIZZOLI)

‘Help! ‘Enough Europe!’ Man takes austerity protest direct to God by climbing Vatican’s St. Peter’s Basilica
VATICAN CITY – An Italian man clambered onto a ledge on the huge dome of St Peter’s Basilica on Tuesday to stage a precarious protest against Prime Minister Mario Monti and the European Union.

Video footage showed the man, identified as Marcello Di Finizio, jumping over railings near the top of the 137-m- (450- ft-) high dome on Tuesday afternoon, shocking visitors taking a tour. He then tied a cord to the railings and abseiled to a ledge over a window in the cupola. (Reuters)

Photos: United Color of Benetton’s Controversial Unhate Campaign Benetton said on Wednesday that it was pulling a photo montage of the pope kissing Egypt’s Sheikh al-Azhar Ahmed al-Tayeb that was part of a new global ad campaign and that had outraged the Vatican.

Photos: United Color of Benetton’s Controversial Unhate Campaign
Benetton said on Wednesday that it was pulling a photo montage of the pope kissing Egypt’s Sheikh al-Azhar Ahmed al-Tayeb that was part of a new global ad campaign and that had outraged the Vatican.

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Tintin in the Congo defended by Vatican newspaper
The Vatican’s official newspaper has come to the defence of boy hero Tintin.
The book Tintin in the Congo, has been placed in the adult section of British bookstores after being branded racist for its depiction of Africans.
The book, published by Egmont, has a protective band around it and  warns that its portrayal of Africans as wide-eyed simpletons would  offend some readers and was based on “the bourgeois, paternalistic  stereotypes of the period.”

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Tintin in the Congo defended by Vatican newspaper

The Vatican’s official newspaper has come to the defence of boy hero Tintin.

The book Tintin in the Congo, has been placed in the adult section of British bookstores after being branded racist for its depiction of Africans.

The book, published by Egmont, has a protective band around it and warns that its portrayal of Africans as wide-eyed simpletons would offend some readers and was based on “the bourgeois, paternalistic stereotypes of the period.”