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National Post

This is the poem that got a Chinese activist seven years in jail“We believe this is a sign that the Chinese leadership is afraid,” said Sarah Schafer, Amnesty International’s China researcher in a statement. “Why else would they sentence someone to seven years in prison for writing a poem?” (Illustration by Andrew Barr)

This is the poem that got a Chinese activist seven years in jail
“We believe this is a sign that the Chinese leadership is afraid,” said Sarah Schafer, Amnesty International’s China researcher in a statement. “Why else would they sentence someone to seven years in prison for writing a poem?” (Illustration by Andrew Barr)

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Retail Therapy: Parkdale Wallpaper’s Hot TypeOh, how the font nerds are gonna love Parkdale Wallpaper Co.! The new line of wall coverings is designed from a typographic perspective and débuts during Toronto Design Week’s Radiant Dark: The Devil is in the Details exhibition this weekend (from $10 per square foot, printed on demand in any custom colour combination, available in standard 27” x 15’ rolls, parkdalewallpaper.ca). 
“I wanted to ground it where I live, and that’s Parkdale,” the collection’s graphic designer and creator Zab Hobart explains. “And there is so much great late Victorian architecture here, and since wallpaper was having a heyday in that era, and was a massive cacophony of pattern, it seemed a natural fit.” Hobart, as the principal of Toronto’s Zab Design & Typography, is an award-winning book designer (she has over a dozen Alcuin Society citations) who also teaches typography at OCAD and York’s Sheridan school. “I think it’s a natural progression from designing endpapers for books,” she says, “if you think about William Morris, who was a printmaker for books. It’s an extension of making patterns.”

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Retail Therapy: Parkdale Wallpaper’s Hot Type
Oh, how the font nerds are gonna love Parkdale Wallpaper Co.! The new line of wall coverings is designed from a typographic perspective and débuts during Toronto Design Week’s Radiant Dark: The Devil is in the Details exhibition this weekend (from $10 per square foot, printed on demand in any custom colour combination, available in standard 27” x 15’ rolls, parkdalewallpaper.ca). 

“I wanted to ground it where I live, and that’s Parkdale,” the collection’s graphic designer and creator Zab Hobart explains. “And there is so much great late Victorian architecture here, and since wallpaper was having a heyday in that era, and was a massive cacophony of pattern, it seemed a natural fit.” Hobart, as the principal of Toronto’s Zab Design & Typography, is an award-winning book designer (she has over a dozen Alcuin Society citations) who also teaches typography at OCAD and York’s Sheridan school. “I think it’s a natural progression from designing endpapers for books,” she says, “if you think about William Morris, who was a printmaker for books. It’s an extension of making patterns.”

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Tubetype: A font that changed the city of LondonIn the midst of the First World War began one of the most iconic, enduring and best-loved fonts in the world: Edward Johnston’s type for the London Undergound. Within a few years, Johnston Sans would be visible not only at Elephant & Castle and Golders Green, but at all points where posters were pasted to walls. Edward Johnston’s work adorned every announcement, whether beautiful or grim (“The last northbound train has gone.”)Johnston was the man who defined London with his type, dominating the capital from the far western reaches of the Metropolitan line in Amersham to easterly Upminster on the District line. (Photo: Luke MacGregor/Reuters)

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Tubetype: A font that changed the city of London
In the midst of the First World War began one of the most iconic, enduring and best-loved fonts in the world: Edward Johnston’s type for the London Undergound. Within a few years, Johnston Sans would be visible not only at Elephant & Castle and Golders Green, but at all points where posters were pasted to walls. Edward Johnston’s work adorned every announcement, whether beautiful or grim (“The last northbound train has gone.”)

Johnston was the man who defined London with his type, dominating the capital from the far western reaches of the Metropolitan line in Amersham to easterly Upminster on the District line. (Photo: Luke MacGregor/Reuters)

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Just My Type: A short history of the ampersandMuch of what one needs to know about the history and beauty of a font  may be found in its ampersand. Done well, an “&” is not so much a  character as a creature, an animal from the deep. Or it is a character  in the other sense of the word, usually a tirelessly entertaining one,  perhaps an uncle with too many magic tricks.

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Just My Type: A short history of the ampersand
Much of what one needs to know about the history and beauty of a font may be found in its ampersand. Done well, an “&” is not so much a character as a creature, an animal from the deep. Or it is a character in the other sense of the word, usually a tirelessly entertaining one, perhaps an uncle with too many magic tricks.

IKEA’s epic Swedish fontroversy: Why company’s font switch from Futura to Verdana mattered:At the end of August 2009, an unusual thing happened in the world: IKEA  changed its typeface. This wasn’t so strange in itself — big companies  like to stay looking fresh, and this is often the easiest way to do it —  but the odd thing was that people noticed.

IKEA’s epic Swedish fontroversy: Why company’s font switch from Futura to Verdana mattered:
At the end of August 2009, an unusual thing happened in the world: IKEA changed its typeface. This wasn’t so strange in itself — big companies like to stay looking fresh, and this is often the easiest way to do it — but the odd thing was that people noticed.

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Textura: A font for the ages
Simon Garfield explores the peculiar history of typefaces in his new book, Just My Type: A Book About Fonts,  published by Gotham Books. In the second of five exclusives excerpts,  Garfield looks at the 15th-century equivalent of Times New Roman:
Johannes Gutenberg didn’t much care about finding a suitable font for  each new project, or even changing the course of Western history. What  he cared about was making money.

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Textura: A font for the ages

Simon Garfield explores the peculiar history of typefaces in his new book, Just My Type: A Book About Fonts, published by Gotham Books. In the second of five exclusives excerpts, Garfield looks at the 15th-century equivalent of Times New Roman:

Johannes Gutenberg didn’t much care about finding a suitable font for each new project, or even changing the course of Western history. What he cared about was making money.

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Comic Sans: The most annoying font in the world
Even if you didn’t know what it was called, you will be familiar with  Comic Sans. Comic Sans is type that has gone wrong. It was designed with  strictly good intentions by a professional man with a solid  philosophical grounding in graphic arts, and it was unleashed upon the  world with a kind heart. It was never intended to cause revulsion or  loathing, much less end up (as it has) on the side of an ambulance or a  gravestone. It was intended to be fun. And, oddly enough, it was never  intended to be a typeface at all.

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Comic Sans: The most annoying font in the world

Even if you didn’t know what it was called, you will be familiar with Comic Sans. Comic Sans is type that has gone wrong. It was designed with strictly good intentions by a professional man with a solid philosophical grounding in graphic arts, and it was unleashed upon the world with a kind heart. It was never intended to cause revulsion or loathing, much less end up (as it has) on the side of an ambulance or a gravestone. It was intended to be fun. And, oddly enough, it was never intended to be a typeface at all.

Hiding in plain sight: Why one Ontario artist travels the world looking for letters

Hiding in plain sight: Why one Ontario artist travels the world looking for letters