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postarcadenp:

Good news everyone! China suspends 14-year-old video game console ban, paving way for Sony, Microsoft
http://bit.ly/1gHNcWJ
BEIJING — China has temporarily lifted a 14-year-old ban on selling video game consoles, paving the way for Sony Corp, Microsoft Corp and Nintendo Co Ltd to enter the world’s third largest video game market in terms of revenue.
China saw video game revenues grow by more than a third in 2012 to nearly US$14 billion last year, but console makers are likely to face an uphill battle for market share in a country where a whole generation has grown up without a PlayStation, Xbox or Wii and where free PC and mobile games dominate.
The absence of consoles has left PC games with almost two-thirds of the market, according to data released at the annual China games industry conference in December. Browser gaming accounted for just over 15% and mobile gaming was nearly 14%, the data also showed.
“If Sony and Microsoft want to expand in China they need to think of changing their business model, and study the success of Internet gaming market providers where games are free but they charge money from operating games,” said Roger Sheng, research director at tech research firm Gartner.

postarcadenp:

Good news everyone! China suspends 14-year-old video game console ban, paving way for Sony, Microsoft

http://bit.ly/1gHNcWJ

BEIJING — China has temporarily lifted a 14-year-old ban on selling video game consoles, paving the way for Sony Corp, Microsoft Corp and Nintendo Co Ltd to enter the world’s third largest video game market in terms of revenue.

China saw video game revenues grow by more than a third in 2012 to nearly US$14 billion last year, but console makers are likely to face an uphill battle for market share in a country where a whole generation has grown up without a PlayStation, Xbox or Wii and where free PC and mobile games dominate.

The absence of consoles has left PC games with almost two-thirds of the market, according to data released at the annual China games industry conference in December. Browser gaming accounted for just over 15% and mobile gaming was nearly 14%, the data also showed.

“If Sony and Microsoft want to expand in China they need to think of changing their business model, and study the success of Internet gaming market providers where games are free but they charge money from operating games,” said Roger Sheng, research director at tech research firm Gartner.

Tagged with:  #news  #video games  #gaming  #tech  #technology  #China

Bionic body no longer science fiction as researchers develop revolutionary new prosthetics, ways to restore sight

Last year, researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland announced plans to outfit a male patient with an artificial hand connected directly to the patient’s nervous system, enabling him to not only control the artificial hand, but to feel via touch signals embedded in the skin of the prosthetic.

Around the world, advancements in prosthetics are accelerating. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new artificial retina technology known as the Argus II that can restore partial sight to people suffering from a specific type of blindness known as retinitis pigmentosa.

Scientists at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles believe they are close to being able to restore a person’s memory capabilities with microchips inserted in the brain, while a San Diego-based company expects to be able to create a human liver via 3D printing technologies sometime in 2014. (Photo: Alessia Pierdomenico/Bloomberg)

Titan Arm makes user stronger as ‘superhero’ exoskeleton emerges as useful technology
Need a hand lifting something? A robotic device invented by University of Pennsylvania engineering students can help its wearer carry an additional 40 pounds.
Titan Arm looks and sounds like part of a superhero’s costume. But its creators say it’s designed for ordinary people — those who need either physical rehabilitation or a little extra muscle for their job.
In technical terms, the apparatus is an untethered, upper-body exoskeleton; to the layman, it’s essentially a battery-powered arm brace attached to a backpack. Either way, Titan Arm’s cost-efficient design has won the team accolades and at least $75,000 in prize money. (Photo: AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)

Titan Arm makes user stronger as ‘superhero’ exoskeleton emerges as useful technology

Need a hand lifting something? A robotic device invented by University of Pennsylvania engineering students can help its wearer carry an additional 40 pounds.

Titan Arm looks and sounds like part of a superhero’s costume. But its creators say it’s designed for ordinary people — those who need either physical rehabilitation or a little extra muscle for their job.

In technical terms, the apparatus is an untethered, upper-body exoskeleton; to the layman, it’s essentially a battery-powered arm brace attached to a backpack. Either way, Titan Arm’s cost-efficient design has won the team accolades and at least $75,000 in prize money. (Photo: AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)

Tagged with:  #news  #science  #tech  #technology  #robotics
postarcadenp:

Canadians covet Sony’s PlayStation 4 over Microsoft’s Xbox One: IDC
By Matthew Braga
http://bit.ly/1cX0fAE
As the battle for supremacy among next generation game consoles kicks into high gear, holiday shoppers in Canada appear to be more interested in purchasing Sony’s new PlayStation 4 than Microsoft’s competing Xbox One, according to new IDC Canada research published today.
Roughly 6% of Canadians sampled say they “definitely” plan to buy a PlayStation 4 for Christmas, according to Krista Napier, the firm’s research manager for mobility & consumer products, versus 4% who said they plan on buying the the Xbox One.
However, that gap is much larger among males aged 18-29, with 13% “definitely” planning to buy a PlayStation, while only 3% have put the Xbox One on their shopping lists…

postarcadenp:

Canadians covet Sony’s PlayStation 4 over Microsoft’s Xbox One: IDC

By Matthew Braga

http://bit.ly/1cX0fAE

As the battle for supremacy among next generation game consoles kicks into high gear, holiday shoppers in Canada appear to be more interested in purchasing Sony’s new PlayStation 4 than Microsoft’s competing Xbox One, according to new IDC Canada research published today.

Roughly 6% of Canadians sampled say they “definitely” plan to buy a PlayStation 4 for Christmas, according to Krista Napier, the firm’s research manager for mobility & consumer products, versus 4% who said they plan on buying the the Xbox One.

However, that gap is much larger among males aged 18-29, with 13% “definitely” planning to buy a PlayStation, while only 3% have put the Xbox One on their shopping lists…

postarcadenp:

Chad Sapieha says the PS4 won the next-gen console launch

http://bit.ly/1chzHf7

But Daniel Kaszor says the Xbox One is the real winner

http://bit.ly/1chzzMN

Who do you believe?

Amazon is testing drones that will deliver packages to your door in 30 minutes
Amazon.com is testing drones to deliver goods as the world’s largest e-commerce company works to improve efficiency and speed in getting products to consumers.
Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos unveiled the plan on CBS’s “60 Minutes” news program in the U.S., showing interviewer Charlie Rose the flying machines that can serve as delivery vehicles. The CEO said the gadgets, called octocopters, can carry as much as five pounds within a 10-mile radius of an Amazon fulfillment center. Amazon may start using the drones, which can make a delivery within 30 minutes, within five years pending Federal Aviation Administration approval, Bezos said.
“It will work, and it will happen, and it’s gonna be a lot of fun,” he said in the “60 Minutes” interview broadcast Sunday. (Photo: Amazon/AFP/Getty Images)

Amazon is testing drones that will deliver packages to your door in 30 minutes

Amazon.com is testing drones to deliver goods as the world’s largest e-commerce company works to improve efficiency and speed in getting products to consumers.

Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos unveiled the plan on CBS’s “60 Minutes” news program in the U.S., showing interviewer Charlie Rose the flying machines that can serve as delivery vehicles. The CEO said the gadgets, called octocopters, can carry as much as five pounds within a 10-mile radius of an Amazon fulfillment center. Amazon may start using the drones, which can make a delivery within 30 minutes, within five years pending Federal Aviation Administration approval, Bezos said.

“It will work, and it will happen, and it’s gonna be a lot of fun,” he said in the “60 Minutes” interview broadcast Sunday. (Photo: Amazon/AFP/Getty Images)

Let there be light! With giant mirrors’ help, mountain town getting winter sun for the first time ever

Residents of the small Norwegian town of Rjukan have finally seen the light.

Tucked in between steep mountains, the town is normally shrouded in shadow for almost six months a year, with residents having to catch a cable car to the top of a nearby precipice to get a fix of midday vitamin D.

But on Wednesday faint rays from the winter sun for the first time reached the town’s market square, thanks to three 17-square-metre mirrors placed on a mountain. (AP Photo/NTB Scanpix, Terje Bendiksby; KRISTER SOERBOE/AFP/Getty Images)

Netflix wants you to be able to watch movies at home the day they hit theatres
Netflix has found a lot of success creating its own TV shows like “Orange is the New Black.” It’d like to be able to disrupt blockbuster movies as well.
But Netflix doesn’t want to just create movies. It wants to convenience people and help them watch hit films from anywhere, immediately. At least, that’s what its Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos communicated over the weekend.
It’s a lofty goal that movie theatres would hate but consumers would love.
Sarandos unleashed his ambitious plan at a Film Independent event. The relevant quote was unearthed by AllThingsD’s Peter Kafka.
“Why not premiere movies on Netflix, the same day they’re opening in theatres?” Sarandos asked the crowd. “And not little movies — there’s a lot of ways, and lot of people to do that [already]. Why not big movies? Why not follow the consumers’ desire to watch things when they want?”

Netflix wants you to be able to watch movies at home the day they hit theatres

Netflix has found a lot of success creating its own TV shows like “Orange is the New Black.” It’d like to be able to disrupt blockbuster movies as well.

But Netflix doesn’t want to just create movies. It wants to convenience people and help them watch hit films from anywhere, immediately. At least, that’s what its Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos communicated over the weekend.

It’s a lofty goal that movie theatres would hate but consumers would love.

Sarandos unleashed his ambitious plan at a Film Independent event. The relevant quote was unearthed by AllThingsD’s Peter Kafka.

“Why not premiere movies on Netflix, the same day they’re opening in theatres?” Sarandos asked the crowd. “And not little movies — there’s a lot of ways, and lot of people to do that [already]. Why not big movies? Why not follow the consumers’ desire to watch things when they want?”

Tagged with:  #news  #Netflix  #tech  #technology  #movies  #film
Legally blind Ottawa girl, sees with high-tech glasses: ‘I went from just seeing nothing to seeing everything in my classroom’
Emma-Rose Gibson can see clearly no more than three centimetres in front of her, but a new device is allowing the nine-year-old Ottawa girl to watch TV.
The legally blind Grade 4 student, who is diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia, is one of the first users of the eSight eyewear, a pair of computerized glasses officially launched Tuesday in Toronto.
The device — made by Ottawa-based eSight Corporation — reconfigures images captured by its high-definition camera in a way to optimize a user’s vision. The processed images are then fed into two LED screens in front of the user’s eyes.
Gibson, who has been using the device since May, said it allows her to participate fully in class and grants her a degree of mobility she didn’t have before.
“When I first heard of it, I was like, ’Wow, this can actually change my life.”’ (Photo: Ethan Lou / The Canadian Press)

Legally blind Ottawa girl, sees with high-tech glasses: ‘I went from just seeing nothing to seeing everything in my classroom’

Emma-Rose Gibson can see clearly no more than three centimetres in front of her, but a new device is allowing the nine-year-old Ottawa girl to watch TV.

The legally blind Grade 4 student, who is diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia, is one of the first users of the eSight eyewear, a pair of computerized glasses officially launched Tuesday in Toronto.

The device — made by Ottawa-based eSight Corporation — reconfigures images captured by its high-definition camera in a way to optimize a user’s vision. The processed images are then fed into two LED screens in front of the user’s eyes.

Gibson, who has been using the device since May, said it allows her to participate fully in class and grants her a degree of mobility she didn’t have before.

“When I first heard of it, I was like, ’Wow, this can actually change my life.”’ (Photo: Ethan Lou / The Canadian Press)

Tagged with:  #news  #tech  #technology  #eSight
Bionic Man close to reality, even if the man who leant his face to the project calls him ‘revolting’
Gentlemen, we can rebuild him, after all. We have the technology.
The term “bionic man” was the stuff of science fiction in the 1970s, when The Six Million Dollar Man chronicled the adventures of Steve Austin, a former astronaut whose body was rebuilt using artificial parts after he nearly died.
Now, a team of engineers has assembled a robot using artificial organs, limbs and other body parts that comes tantalizingly close to a true “bionic man.” For real, this time.
The artificial “man” is the subject of a Smithsonian Channel documentary that airs Sunday, Oct. 20 at 9 p.m. Called The Incredible Bionic Man, it chronicles engineers’ attempt to assemble a functioning body using artificial parts that range from a working kidney and circulation system to cochlear and retina implants. (Photo: AP Photo/Showtime, Joe Schram)

Bionic Man close to reality, even if the man who leant his face to the project calls him ‘revolting’

Gentlemen, we can rebuild him, after all. We have the technology.

The term “bionic man” was the stuff of science fiction in the 1970s, when The Six Million Dollar Man chronicled the adventures of Steve Austin, a former astronaut whose body was rebuilt using artificial parts after he nearly died.

Now, a team of engineers has assembled a robot using artificial organs, limbs and other body parts that comes tantalizingly close to a true “bionic man.” For real, this time.

The artificial “man” is the subject of a Smithsonian Channel documentary that airs Sunday, Oct. 20 at 9 p.m. Called The Incredible Bionic Man, it chronicles engineers’ attempt to assemble a functioning body using artificial parts that range from a working kidney and circulation system to cochlear and retina implants. (Photo: AP Photo/Showtime, Joe Schram)

U.S. Army building Iron Man style suits to give soldiers ‘superhuman strength’ 
The U.S. Army is calling on private developers and R&D organizations to help it build power armour much akin to that used by the fictional character Iron Man.
The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit (or TALOS) would be designed to give soldiers an advantage in combat with “superhuman strength” and mobility.
“[The] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armour, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that — a whole bunch of stuff that [the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command] is playing heavily in,” Lt. Col. Karl Borjes wrote on the official homepage of the U.S. Army. (Photo: U.S. Army)

U.S. Army building Iron Man style suits to give soldiers ‘superhuman strength’ 

The U.S. Army is calling on private developers and R&D organizations to help it build power armour much akin to that used by the fictional character Iron Man.

The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit (or TALOS) would be designed to give soldiers an advantage in combat with “superhuman strength” and mobility.

“[The] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armour, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that — a whole bunch of stuff that [the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command] is playing heavily in,” Lt. Col. Karl Borjes wrote on the official homepage of the U.S. Army. (Photo: U.S. Army)

Tagged with:  #news  #U.S. Army  #tech  #technology  #TALOS  #Iron Man
nationalpostphotos:

'Mini-me' in 3D — Journalist and presenter Evan Davies poses with a 3D printed model of himself in the exhibition '3D: printing the future' in the Science Museum on October 8, 2013 in London, England. Mr Davies' model features his arm in a sling due to him being scanned in August 2013 whilst recovering from a broken wrist. The exhibition, which opens to the public tomorrow, features over 600 3D printed objects ranging from: replacement organs, artworks, aircraft parts and a handgun.  (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

nationalpostphotos:

'Mini-me' in 3D — Journalist and presenter Evan Davies poses with a 3D printed model of himself in the exhibition '3D: printing the future' in the Science Museum on October 8, 2013 in London, England. Mr Davies' model features his arm in a sling due to him being scanned in August 2013 whilst recovering from a broken wrist. The exhibition, which opens to the public tomorrow, features over 600 3D printed objects ranging from: replacement organs, artworks, aircraft parts and a handgun.  (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #tech  #3D printing  #technology
Point, shoot, collapse: Why big camera companies are the next BlackBerry
Sometime last year, a once unthinkable trend began to manifest itself among camera retailers worldwide.
Sales of compact, point-and-shoot cameras had long since gone off a cliff, steeply falling opposite the astronomical rise of capable smartphone cameras. But now, a disaster scenario was truly beginning to show, as sales of single lens reflex cameras (SLRs) also began to exhibit a decline for the very first time.
These are the cameras of photo enthusiasts: people who cannot imagine compromising any aspect of their picture’s quality, care about have absolute control over exposure and might even get a little giddy about saving up for a better lens, a brighter piece of “glass.”
For Canon Inc. and Nikon Corp., these people were their high-margin growth customer. With half a century of dominance in the film camera business, the stalwart Japanese camera giants had traded on this reputation to ride the digital wave. A boon for SLR sales. It was long believed that the clear inferiority of smartphone pictures would ensure the safety of this stronghold.
Now, Nikon shares are down 33% on the Tokyo Stock Exchange so far this year, and Canon, which at least has other business lines to fall back on, is down almost 7%. Smartphones — especially today’s batch of modern, capable, high-resolution shooters — have proven more of a threat, harder to emulate, and even harder to beat, than anyone could have thought.
Instead, it is Apple Inc., Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Google Inc. and even Microsoft Corp.’s Nokia that, have become consumer photography’s new guard for the typical shooter and even the avid enthusiast. (Photo: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg News)

Point, shoot, collapse: Why big camera companies are the next BlackBerry

Sometime last year, a once unthinkable trend began to manifest itself among camera retailers worldwide.

Sales of compact, point-and-shoot cameras had long since gone off a cliff, steeply falling opposite the astronomical rise of capable smartphone cameras. But now, a disaster scenario was truly beginning to show, as sales of single lens reflex cameras (SLRs) also began to exhibit a decline for the very first time.

These are the cameras of photo enthusiasts: people who cannot imagine compromising any aspect of their picture’s quality, care about have absolute control over exposure and might even get a little giddy about saving up for a better lens, a brighter piece of “glass.”

For Canon Inc. and Nikon Corp., these people were their high-margin growth customer. With half a century of dominance in the film camera business, the stalwart Japanese camera giants had traded on this reputation to ride the digital wave. A boon for SLR sales. It was long believed that the clear inferiority of smartphone pictures would ensure the safety of this stronghold.

Now, Nikon shares are down 33% on the Tokyo Stock Exchange so far this year, and Canon, which at least has other business lines to fall back on, is down almost 7%. Smartphones — especially today’s batch of modern, capable, high-resolution shooters — have proven more of a threat, harder to emulate, and even harder to beat, than anyone could have thought.

Instead, it is Apple Inc., Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Google Inc. and even Microsoft Corp.’s Nokia that, have become consumer photography’s new guard for the typical shooter and even the avid enthusiast. (Photo: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg News)

BlackBerry’s saviour? Fairfax bid to take struggling company private is far from a done deal

BlackBerry’s saviour? Fairfax bid to take struggling company private is far from a done deal

iParenting: Rationed screen time isn’t only for the kids
Adam O. Thomas is ‘‘guilty,’’ and he’d be the first to tell you so. He’s the guy pushing his daughter, Sylvie, on the swing at their local park in Vancouver with one hand and texting his buddies with the other. The ‘‘ping!’’ of a new message will almost always halt a very “serious dance party,” much to the four-and-a-half year-old’s chagrin.
Sometimes, Mr. Thomas will be admonished by that sweet little girl voice: “Daddy, you come home and you’re always on your phone!”
“She’s frustrated, because she’s watched her shows, she’s done her drawings and she wants to show me those drawings,” says Mr. Thomas, the co-creator of the forthcoming web TV series Parked, about a group of 30-something guy friends. “I sort of had to take a position where it’s like ‘I need to take some time when I get home to participate in that moment with her because that moment, for her, does not exist a half an hour later.”
As families scramble to keep up with the rapid advancements of technology (both Apple and BlackBerry released new touch-screen smartphones this week), children are not the only ones whose screen time has come under scrutiny. British schools this month distributed brochures scolding parents for ignoring their children in favour of their smartphones, and advised them to switch off the phones before bedtime and chat with their kids or read a story instead. (Photo: Ben Nelms For National Post)

iParenting: Rationed screen time isn’t only for the kids

Adam O. Thomas is ‘‘guilty,’’ and he’d be the first to tell you so. He’s the guy pushing his daughter, Sylvie, on the swing at their local park in Vancouver with one hand and texting his buddies with the other. The ‘‘ping!’’ of a new message will almost always halt a very “serious dance party,” much to the four-and-a-half year-old’s chagrin.

Sometimes, Mr. Thomas will be admonished by that sweet little girl voice: “Daddy, you come home and you’re always on your phone!”

“She’s frustrated, because she’s watched her shows, she’s done her drawings and she wants to show me those drawings,” says Mr. Thomas, the co-creator of the forthcoming web TV series Parked, about a group of 30-something guy friends. “I sort of had to take a position where it’s like ‘I need to take some time when I get home to participate in that moment with her because that moment, for her, does not exist a half an hour later.”

As families scramble to keep up with the rapid advancements of technology (both Apple and BlackBerry released new touch-screen smartphones this week), children are not the only ones whose screen time has come under scrutiny. British schools this month distributed brochures scolding parents for ignoring their children in favour of their smartphones, and advised them to switch off the phones before bedtime and chat with their kids or read a story instead. (Photo: Ben Nelms For National Post)

Tagged with:  #parenting  #children  #technology