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National Post

Mysterious clown terrifying city — and gaining online fame — with unexpected appearances
A mysterious man calling himself the “Northampton Clown” is freaking out Northampton, England. Dressed much like the clown Pennywise from the Stephen King novel It, the clown is fond of standing creepily and updating his Facebook page, “Spot the Northampton Clown.”
“For those of you with phobias and fears, you don’t have to like and comment on this page. See you around soon,” The Northampton Clown wrote on the page. It’s filled with photos culled from social media, showing the clown lurking in a variety of dark corners around Northampton, just over 100 kilometres northwest of London. (Photo: Facebook)

Mysterious clown terrifying city — and gaining online fame — with unexpected appearances

A mysterious man calling himself the “Northampton Clown” is freaking out Northampton, England. Dressed much like the clown Pennywise from the Stephen King novel It, the clown is fond of standing creepily and updating his Facebook page, “Spot the Northampton Clown.”

“For those of you with phobias and fears, you don’t have to like and comment on this page. See you around soon,” The Northampton Clown wrote on the page. It’s filled with photos culled from social media, showing the clown lurking in a variety of dark corners around Northampton, just over 100 kilometres northwest of London. (Photo: Facebook)

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Open Book: 11/22/63, by Stephen King
A  confession to the reader: Prior to reviewing 11/22/63 I had  never read a Stephen King novel. This was not due to literary snobbery.  Many friends whose judgment I respect admire some of his books. Perhaps  King’s tendency to write long — his latest characteristically weighs in  at 849 pages — has deterred me. But this epic of time travel on the part  of one Jake Epping, a 35-year-old Maine high school teacher who finds  himself transported back to 1958 and spends five years meditating how to  stop Lee Harvey Oswald from assassinating the president, is too curious  a concept to pass by. You can always get my attention on the subject of  Kennedy’s assassination.

nparts:

Open Book: 11/22/63, by Stephen King

A  confession to the reader: Prior to reviewing 11/22/63 I had never read a Stephen King novel. This was not due to literary snobbery. Many friends whose judgment I respect admire some of his books. Perhaps King’s tendency to write long — his latest characteristically weighs in at 849 pages — has deterred me. But this epic of time travel on the part of one Jake Epping, a 35-year-old Maine high school teacher who finds himself transported back to 1958 and spends five years meditating how to stop Lee Harvey Oswald from assassinating the president, is too curious a concept to pass by. You can always get my attention on the subject of Kennedy’s assassination.

Extremely Bad Advice: Adapt or CryDear Steve, My friends keep getting mad when movie adaptations aren’t the same as the book. They propose the movie should say ‘inspired by’ the book instead of using the book’s name. I think they should figure out that it’s impossible to keep what they think is the essential part of the book since we’re all different people and movies are as similar to books as game shows are to political debates. Who’s totally wrong?STEP ONE So let me get this straight. Your friends would be satisfied if, say, Game of Thrones was instead called Throne Games: Inspired by Game of Thrones? Somehow, I doubt it, chum. Should there be a board set up to review the changes from page to screen and give it a rating system? From “NB: nothing to do with the book” to “EL: every single #$@%ing line is on the screen. Happy, nerd?”

Extremely Bad Advice: Adapt or Cry
Dear Steve, My friends keep getting mad when movie adaptations aren’t the same as the book. They propose the movie should say ‘inspired by’ the book instead of using the book’s name. I think they should figure out that it’s impossible to keep what they think is the essential part of the book since we’re all different people and movies are as similar to books as game shows are to political debates. Who’s totally wrong?

STEP ONE So let me get this straight. Your friends would be satisfied if, say, Game of Thrones was instead called Throne Games: Inspired by Game of Thrones? Somehow, I doubt it, chum. Should there be a board set up to review the changes from page to screen and give it a rating system? From “NB: nothing to do with the book” to “EL: every single #$@%ing line is on the screen. Happy, nerd?”