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National Post

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Rihanna’s Thai sex show tweet leads to arrest of Phuket bar owner
Thai authorities have arrested a bar owner in connection with a lewd sex show mentioned in racy tweets by pop star Rihanna during her recent trip to Thailand, officials said Monday, two weeks after an Instagram photo of Rihanna with a protected primate led to the arrest of two other men.
“Either I was … wasted last night,” Rihanna’s tweet read, “Or I saw a Thai woman pull a live bird, 2 turtles, razors, shoot darts and ping pong, all out of her p—y.”
Officials on the island of Phuket said Monday the bar owner faced charges of obscenity and operating an entertainment venue without a permit.

nparts:

Rihanna’s Thai sex show tweet leads to arrest of Phuket bar owner

Thai authorities have arrested a bar owner in connection with a lewd sex show mentioned in racy tweets by pop star Rihanna during her recent trip to Thailand, officials said Monday, two weeks after an Instagram photo of Rihanna with a protected primate led to the arrest of two other men.

“Either I was … wasted last night,” Rihanna’s tweet read, “Or I saw a Thai woman pull a live bird, 2 turtles, razors, shoot darts and ping pong, all out of her p—y.”

Officials on the island of Phuket said Monday the bar owner faced charges of obscenity and operating an entertainment venue without a permit.

Tagged with:  #Rihanna  #Thailand  #Phuket
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With more than 47 million digital singles sold, two platinum certifications and 11 No. 1 hits on the Billboard Top 100, it’s hard to question the commercial savvy of the pop juggernaut known simply as Rihanna. But how does that savvy translate to a well-curated series of concerts — the 777 tour — that are as much hype as they are spectacle? Find out here: natpo.st/XMvutK

nparts:

With more than 47 million digital singles sold, two platinum certifications and 11 No. 1 hits on the Billboard Top 100, it’s hard to question the commercial savvy of the pop juggernaut known simply as Rihanna. But how does that savvy translate to a well-curated series of concerts — the 777 tour — that are as much hype as they are spectacle? Find out here: natpo.st/XMvutK

Tagged with:  #Rihanna  #music  #777  #Toronto

nparts:

Photo Gallery: Grammy Awards red carpet 
The music industry’s biggest and brightest were in Los Angeles on Sunday night for the 54th annual Grammy Awards. Here are some images of the evening’s style hits and misses. More photos here. (Reuters)

Trending: Ladies in redA friend of mine, for whom having a heart-stopping face was not enough, used to dye her hair a red verging on carmine. She was at her most potent then: She wore black velvet, smoked thin cigarettes and laughed generously. When her hair began to fade back to a regularly lovely sort of amber, she seemed also to retreat a little from life. I couldn’t say which change came first: the hair or the temperament.For no woman are the two so inextricably tangled than the Titian kind. “Gentlemen prefer blonds, marry a brunette and have always had a thing for a redhead,” goes the Playboy-ism. But while blonds and brunettes are plentiful enough to dilute their stereotypes, natural redheads spring from a genetic mutation occurring in less than 4% of the (Caucasian) population. We simply don’t know enough of them to know them. In ancient Egypt, the fire-haired were offered sacrificially to Egyptian gods; in the Middle Ages, they were presumed to be vampires. And while the Celts considered them sacred, the Irish-loathing Brits consequently persecuted them (even today, “gingers” are bullied in savage England). And in the rest of the Western world, true redheads remain as wanted and elusive as that vermilion villain, Carmen Sandiego.“There is a certain kind of woman who wants to have red hair,” says L’Oreal Professional’s director of education, Colin Ford. He points to Julianne Moore as the natural, nu-Titian ideal; her, or a Moulin Rouge!-era Nicole Kidman. “If someone dyes her hair red, she wants the attention, and she is not afraid.” Although “flash reds” — the highly unnatural, sour-cherry hues seen most often on hairdressers themselves, or Rihanna — are increasingly popular, Ford says most fake redheads don’t want to look it. “There is something special about being a redhead,” he tells me — then concedes he’s rather ginger himself.

Trending: Ladies in red
A friend of mine, for whom having a heart-stopping face was not enough, used to dye her hair a red verging on carmine. She was at her most potent then: She wore black velvet, smoked thin cigarettes and laughed generously. When her hair began to fade back to a regularly lovely sort of amber, she seemed also to retreat a little from life. I couldn’t say which change came first: the hair or the temperament.

For no woman are the two so inextricably tangled than the Titian kind. “Gentlemen prefer blonds, marry a brunette and have always had a thing for a redhead,” goes the Playboy-ism. But while blonds and brunettes are plentiful enough to dilute their stereotypes, natural redheads spring from a genetic mutation occurring in less than 4% of the (Caucasian) population. We simply don’t know enough of them to know them. In ancient Egypt, the fire-haired were offered sacrificially to Egyptian gods; in the Middle Ages, they were presumed to be vampires. And while the Celts considered them sacred, the Irish-loathing Brits consequently persecuted them (even today, “gingers” are bullied in savage England). And in the rest of the Western world, true redheads remain as wanted and elusive as that vermilion villain, Carmen Sandiego.

“There is a certain kind of woman who wants to have red hair,” says L’Oreal Professional’s director of education, Colin Ford. He points to Julianne Moore as the natural, nu-Titian ideal; her, or a Moulin Rouge!-era Nicole Kidman. “If someone dyes her hair red, she wants the attention, and she is not afraid.” Although “flash reds” — the highly unnatural, sour-cherry hues seen most often on hairdressers themselves, or Rihanna — are increasingly popular, Ford says most fake redheads don’t want to look it. “There is something special about being a redhead,” he tells me — then concedes he’s rather ginger himself.