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National Post

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These are not toy planes — An aerial view of the 50th Paris Air Show at Le Bourget airport, north of Paris, Wednesday, June 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

nationalpostphotos:

These are not toy planes — An aerial view of the 50th Paris Air Show at Le Bourget airport, north of Paris, Wednesday, June 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Plane of ‘highest scoring’ living Canadian fighter ace found in Egypt
A Second World War fighter plane, just discovered in the Egyptian desert 70 years after it was crash-landed there by its British pilot, is generating excitement among vintage aircraft experts in Canada who suspect the long-buried Kittyhawk P-40 — literally unearthed from the sands of time — was once flown by one of this country’s great aces in the air battles of North Africa: Saskatchewan-born James “Stocky” Edwards, now 90 and living in Comox, B.C.

Edwards is, in fact, considered to be the “highest scoring” living fighter ace in Canada, credited with 19 “confirmed kills” and many additional damaged and destroyed enemy aircraft on the ground.

Flying car a ‘step closer,’ says U.S. firm
Spanning 2.3 metres as a car, it fits into a normal-sized garage, before unfurling an eight-metre wingspan.

To take advantage, would-be owners will need to have both a driver’s and pilot’s licence — with a minimum of 20 hours of flying time.

Everything takes a hit from the economic downturn. Even, apparently, the global arms trade. Larger

Everything takes a hit from the economic downturn. Even, apparently, the global arms trade. Larger

U.S. loses contact with hypersonic experimental planeU.S. military scientists on Thursday launched a hypersonic aircraft but lost contact with the experimental plane in its second test flight, officials said.The unmanned Falcon Hypersonic Technology Vehicle (HTV-2), designed as a global bomber prototype capable of a mind-boggling 20 times the speed of sound, launched successfully from California aboard a Minotaur IV rocket, according to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.But after the plane separated from the rocket in the upper reaches of the atmosphere for its “glide” phase, contact was lost, DARPA said.The hypersonic plane, which is supposed to travel at Mach 20, or 21,000 kilometres per hour, could potentially provide the U.S. military with a platform for striking targets anywhere on the planet within minutes using conventional weapons. (Photo: DARPA/AFP Getty Images)

U.S. loses contact with hypersonic experimental plane
U.S. military scientists on Thursday launched a hypersonic aircraft but lost contact with the experimental plane in its second test flight, officials said.

The unmanned Falcon Hypersonic Technology Vehicle (HTV-2), designed as a global bomber prototype capable of a mind-boggling 20 times the speed of sound, launched successfully from California aboard a Minotaur IV rocket, according to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

But after the plane separated from the rocket in the upper reaches of the atmosphere for its “glide” phase, contact was lost, DARPA said.

The hypersonic plane, which is supposed to travel at Mach 20, or 21,000 kilometres per hour, could potentially provide the U.S. military with a platform for striking targets anywhere on the planet within minutes using conventional weapons. (Photo: DARPA/AFP Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #News  #Aviation  #Planes  #Airplane  #Military
Why business travel may be hazardous to your healthThe Hollywood films Up In the Air and Planes, Trains and Automobiles provide two different portraits of the business traveller. The second movie has the John Candy character of Del Griffiths, a beer-swilling chain-smoking shower curtain ring salesman who doesn’t have a home for the holidays. The first movie has George Clooney’s Ryan Bingham, who brags about the 320 days per year he spends on the road, and the 350,000 air miles the trips accumulated for him.Clooney’s character seems healthy; Candy’s was a mess. Which one better reflects the reality of the business traveller? I have seen both types of business travellers in my practice. Results from two recent studies present an apparent paradox on the health effects of business travel. To investigate the paradox, a colleague and I visited Boston last week to announce a new study on the health of business travellers at the International Society of Travel Medicine Scientific Meeting. (Illustration: Andrew Barr)

Why business travel may be hazardous to your health
The Hollywood films Up In the Air and Planes, Trains and Automobiles provide two different portraits of the business traveller. The second movie has the John Candy character of Del Griffiths, a beer-swilling chain-smoking shower curtain ring salesman who doesn’t have a home for the holidays. The first movie has George Clooney’s Ryan Bingham, who brags about the 320 days per year he spends on the road, and the 350,000 air miles the trips accumulated for him.

Clooney’s character seems healthy; Candy’s was a mess. Which one better reflects the reality of the business traveller? I have seen both types of business travellers in my practice. Results from two recent studies present an apparent paradox on the health effects of business travel. To investigate the paradox, a colleague and I visited Boston last week to announce a new study on the health of business travellers at the International Society of Travel Medicine Scientific Meeting. (Illustration: Andrew Barr)