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Luka Rocco Magnotta’s alleged victim identified as Concordia student Lin JunPolice revealed today they have uncovered a key piece of evidence in the Montreal body parts murder mystery by identifying the victim of alleged killer Luka Rocco Magnotta.Magnotta, 29, a self-confessed Canadian porn star wanted in connection with a killing that saw a torso left in a suitcase and a hand and foot mailed to the Ottawa offices of the Liberal and Conservative parties fled to Paris on the day of the May 25 murder, police believe.Detectives revealed today his alleged victim is Lin Jun, a 33-year-old Concordia University student from Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Luka Rocco Magnotta’s alleged victim identified as Concordia student Lin Jun
Police revealed today they have uncovered a key piece of evidence in the Montreal body parts murder mystery by identifying the victim of alleged killer Luka Rocco Magnotta.

Magnotta, 29, a self-confessed Canadian porn star wanted in connection with a killing that saw a torso left in a suitcase and a hand and foot mailed to the Ottawa offices of the Liberal and Conservative parties fled to Paris on the day of the May 25 murder, police believe.

Detectives revealed today his alleged victim is Lin Jun, a 33-year-old Concordia University student from Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Manhunt underway for Luka Rocco Magnotta as police search for missing body partsThe police had finished their work inside and Apartment 208 was pretty much stripped bare, but the stomach-turning stench and darkened red stain on the mattress left little doubt that something terrible had happened here.“The smell of death is not funny,” Eric Schorer, the building’s superintendent, said as he opened the door Wednesday afternoon. “If you look at the bed, that’s where it happened.”Within hours, Montreal police would issue a wanted bulletin for the tenant of the one-room apartment, 29-year-old Luka Rocco Magnotta, sought for one of the most gruesome killings in Montreal in recent memory.Not only was the unidentified victim dismembered, not only were two body parts apparently mailed to political parties in Ottawa, but it has emerged that the killer filmed his crime and posted it on the Internet. The snuff film titled 1 Lunatic 1 Ice Pick, depicting the dismemberment of an Asian male body and various indignities to the remains, has provoked online debate about its veracity since it was posted last week. Police have confirmed the video depicts the actual crime. Related:Police probe video of porn star suspect allegedly dismembering victimLuka Rocco Magnotta dated Karla Homolka, police confirmPolitical mastermind behind Stephen Harper made grisly discovery of human footThe web can help topple dictators, but it can also embolden killers

Manhunt underway for Luka Rocco Magnotta as police search for missing body parts
The police had finished their work inside and Apartment 208 was pretty much stripped bare, but the stomach-turning stench and darkened red stain on the mattress left little doubt that something terrible had happened here.

“The smell of death is not funny,” Eric Schorer, the building’s superintendent, said as he opened the door Wednesday afternoon. “If you look at the bed, that’s where it happened.”

Within hours, Montreal police would issue a wanted bulletin for the tenant of the one-room apartment, 29-year-old Luka Rocco Magnotta, sought for one of the most gruesome killings in Montreal in recent memory.

Not only was the unidentified victim dismembered, not only were two body parts apparently mailed to political parties in Ottawa, but it has emerged that the killer filmed his crime and posted it on the Internet. The snuff film titled 1 Lunatic 1 Ice Pick, depicting the dismemberment of an Asian male body and various indignities to the remains, has provoked online debate about its veracity since it was posted last week. Police have confirmed the video depicts the actual crime.

Related:
Police probe video of porn star suspect allegedly dismembering victim
Luka Rocco Magnotta dated Karla Homolka, police confirm
Political mastermind behind Stephen Harper made grisly discovery of human foot
The web can help topple dictators, but it can also embolden killers

Lawyers take to the streets with students for Montreal’s 35th consecutive night of protest
As negotiations between student leaders and the provincial Liberals resumed in Quebec City Monday evening after a supper break, more protests took place in different parts of Quebec including Montreal, which hosted its 35th consecutive night of demonstrations.

Lawyers dressed in their courtroom gowns paraded in silence from the city’s main courthouse through the streets of Old Montreal to join the nightly march.

“It is one of the first times I’ve seen lawyers protest in public like this…and I’ve been practising for almost 30 years,” Bruno Grenier said outside the building surrounded by about 250 people, some carrying copies of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The lawyer said his colleagues wanted to show the public that they oppose a law they “find unjust and which is probably unconstitutional.” (Photos: Canadian Press/Reuters)

'Arbitrary' arrests being used to silence student opposition: Parti Quebecois The historic scope of the unrest in Quebec was illustrated in surreal scenes and statistics Thursday: more people were detained within a few hours — at least 650 of them, in mass roundups — than were arrested in the entire October Crisis.More than 2,500 people have been arrested in a months-long dispute that has catapulted the province onto international news pages.That is at least five times the number jailed during the 1970 FLQ crisis that saw martial law declared in Quebec.“That’s where the Quebec Liberal party has taken us: mass arrests, more often than not arbitrary ones, to silence opposition,” said Parti Quebecois Leader Pauline Marois.

'Arbitrary' arrests being used to silence student opposition: Parti Quebecois
The historic scope of the unrest in Quebec was illustrated in surreal scenes and statistics Thursday: more people were detained within a few hours — at least 650 of them, in mass roundups — than were arrested in the entire October Crisis.

More than 2,500 people have been arrested in a months-long dispute that has catapulted the province onto international news pages.

That is at least five times the number jailed during the 1970 FLQ crisis that saw martial law declared in Quebec.

“That’s where the Quebec Liberal party has taken us: mass arrests, more often than not arbitrary ones, to silence opposition,” said Parti Quebecois Leader Pauline Marois.

Record arrests as police use controversial kettling to control Montreal protests
Police made more than 500 arrests Wednesday evening, the largest number of people arrested in a single night so far in the weeks-long Quebec student demonstrations, after using a controversial technique to control protesters.

The evening march that began with people festively banging pots and pans in support of protesting students ended in the early morning hours with police kettling a crowd of demonstrators and arresting 518 people.

The arrests came just hours after the Quebec government signalled it would be getting tougher on the striking students and set strict conditions for any resumption of negotiations with student strike leaders: There will be no talk of a tuition freeze, and no question of scrapping a newly enacted emergency law. (Photos: The Canadian Press; Gazette; AP/Getty Images; Reuters)

Controversial new laws in effect, Montreal police arrest dozens
Montreal police brought the hammer down on student demonstrators Tuesday night, enforcing a controversial law that brought tens of thousands into the streets in a protest earlier in the day that drew international support.

By the end of a cat-and-mouse operation that marked the fourth straight night of clashes, police spokesman Simon Delorme said that at least 100 people had been arrested and two police officers had been injured.

It is believed to be the first time Bill 78 and the city’s new anti-mask bylaw were used by police.

The daytime march was considered to be one of the biggest protests held in the city and related events were held in New York, Paris, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.

Although fewer than one-third of Quebec’s college and university students are boycotting classes, they have galvanized anger against the provincial government to the point that it tried to defend its new law by saying there were other places with tougher legislation.

Full story here. (Photos: The Canadian Press; The Gazette; Reuters; AFP/Getty Images)

'A declaration of war': Quebec students rage over proposed finesThreats of further student-related mayhem in Quebec have intensified with the government’s intention to crack down on the protest movement by hitting it hard in the pocketbook.Emergency legislation introduced overnight provides for fines of between $1,000 and $5,000 for any individual who prevents someone from entering an educational institution.The penalties climb to between $7,000 and $35,000 for a student leader and to between $25,000 and $125,000 for unions or student federations.In all cases, the fines will double for repeat offenders.“It’s a declaration of war, not only against students but also against anyone who clings in any way to democracy, against anyone who clings to what Quebec was before this legislation was tabled,” said student leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois. (Allen McInnis/The Gazette)

'A declaration of war': Quebec students rage over proposed fines
Threats of further student-related mayhem in Quebec have intensified with the government’s intention to crack down on the protest movement by hitting it hard in the pocketbook.

Emergency legislation introduced overnight provides for fines of between $1,000 and $5,000 for any individual who prevents someone from entering an educational institution.

The penalties climb to between $7,000 and $35,000 for a student leader and to between $25,000 and $125,000 for unions or student federations.

In all cases, the fines will double for repeat offenders.

“It’s a declaration of war, not only against students but also against anyone who clings in any way to democracy, against anyone who clings to what Quebec was before this legislation was tabled,” said student leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois. (Allen McInnis/The Gazette)

122 Quebec protesters arrested in raucous night before proposed strike-breaking legislation
A bid to restore order in restive Quebec was met with streets clogged with thousands of protesters, a multitude of flying projectiles, several smashed windows, and blasts of pepper spray leading to 122 arrests.

The unrest on Wednesday night followed the Quebec government’s announcement it would suspend the current academic session for striking students in an effort to calm things down.

It also hinted at more punitive measures, without sharing details. (Photos: ROGERIO BARBOSA/AFP/GettyImages)

Riot police clash with protesters to force open several Quebec schools
Riot police shoved away a crowd of protesters while helping to force open a school in one of several tense scenes in Quebec on Tuesday.

It was a notable development amid three months of social unrest, during which several legal injunctions to reopen schools have been ignored and resisted by picketing protesters while others were respected.

In this case provincial riot squad fired chemical irritants at about 100 protesters who refused to move as they blocked the entrance of a junior college north of Montreal. (Photos: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Nearly nude students take to Montreal’s streets to protest tuition hike
Striking students stripped down to their birthday suits and an astonishing array of red underwear to protest, yet again, against Quebec’s proposed tuition hikes.

The symbolism of the nearly nude event was featured in the chants the students shouted out as they marched through Montreal’s Plateau neighbourhoold: “Tout nu dehors, jusqu’a la victoire,” which translates to naked outside until victory, but doesn’t rhyme in English. (Photos: Vincenzo D’Alto/Postmedia News; Christinne Muschi/Reuters)

Montreal May Day anti-capitalism march sees protesters use Black Bloc anarchist tactics
A May Day protest in downtown Montreal on Tuesday, led by the anti-capitalist group CLAC Montreal, quickly dissolved into a violent fracas that saw 108 people arrested and 33 charged. (Photos: Postmedia; Reuters)

Montreal police and protesters rage through the night as tuition march turns violent
Montreal is waking up to a morning of smashed windows, vandalized cars and questions about how a protest degenerated into yet another violent clash between police and demonstrators.

Anger over a short lived effort to put an end to the tuition crisis through negotiations bubbled over Wednesday night when a hastily-organized demonstration turned ugly and police used batons, pepper spray and percussion bombs to disperse the crowd.

After two hours of peaceful protest, police declared the march illegal and the situation unravelled quickly. A car was set on fire at a major downtown intersection and chaos ensued as the police started to push the crowd back using whatever tools they had in their arsenal. (Photos: Dario Ayala, Allen McInnis/Postmedia News)

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Au Pied de Cochon: The art of Martin Picard’s cookbook
When food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote How to Cook a Wolf she was writing figuratively, about cuisine in times of austerity. There is neither rationing nor austerity in evidence in Au Pied de Cochon Sugar Shack, the encyclopedic new cookbook from Martin Picard, the soft-spoken maple syrup-whisperer and Québecois chef who cooks famously bombastic meals.

nparts:

Au Pied de Cochon: The art of Martin Picard’s cookbook

When food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote How to Cook a Wolf she was writing figuratively, about cuisine in times of austerity. There is neither rationing nor austerity in evidence in Au Pied de Cochon Sugar Shack, the encyclopedic new cookbook from Martin Picard, the soft-spoken maple syrup-whisperer and Québecois chef who cooks famously bombastic meals.

More than 150 arrested after anti-brutality protesters clash with police in Montreal
Police in Montreal made more than 150 arrests Thursday when an annual anti-police brutality march turned violent. A police car was flipped over and smashed and numerous store-front windows destroyed when 2,000 protesters — a mix of students demonstrating against tuition hikes and citizens against police brutality — gathered for a rush hour march. (Photos: Graham Hughes/Postmedia News; Olivier Jean/Reuters)