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National Post

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Why we won’t let musicians rest in peaceIt’s called the “death effect” and it’s the same for actors, authors and artists — whether it’s an increase in exposure or a supply-induced demand (no more painter, no more paintings), public hunger for a person’s work grows exponentially following their passing. When it comes to musicians, however, the situation has the added element of necromancy, a sort of pop culture-tinged resurrection. From conspiracy theories claiming fake deaths to companies using technology to revive long-gone artists, audiences refuse to let musicians rest in peace. (Illustration by Steve Murray)

nparts:

Why we won’t let musicians rest in peace
It’s called the “death effect” and it’s the same for actors, authors and artists — whether it’s an increase in exposure or a supply-induced demand (no more painter, no more paintings), public hunger for a person’s work grows exponentially following their passing. When it comes to musicians, however, the situation has the added element of necromancy, a sort of pop culture-tinged resurrection. From conspiracy theories claiming fake deaths to companies using technology to revive long-gone artists, audiences refuse to let musicians rest in peace. (Illustration by Steve Murray)

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Conrad Murray sentenced to four years in prison
Dr. Conrad Murray has been sentenced to four years in prison — the  highest prison term for his conviction — on Nov. 29 for the involuntary  manslaughter of pop star Michael Jackson.
Murray was found guilty  of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson on Nov. 7,  in a case that captivated Michael Jackson fans worldwide. Jackson died  on June 25, 2009, of what was determined to be an overdose of sedatives  and propofol.
Murray was accused by Judge Michael Pastor of  propagating a “continuing series of lies” to Jackson’s friends, family,  security team and various healthcare providers — including paramedics —  that were “not designed to help his patient” but rather “to deceive and  to give Dr. Murray a way out.” Pastor also called Murray’s recording of  Jackson while the pop star was under heavy influence propofol an  “insurance policy,” and called out Murray’s continuous supplying to  Jackson of “staggering” amounts of the powerful painkiller and sedative a  “clear violation of the patient-caregiver agreement.”

nparts:

Conrad Murray sentenced to four years in prison

Dr. Conrad Murray has been sentenced to four years in prison — the highest prison term for his conviction — on Nov. 29 for the involuntary manslaughter of pop star Michael Jackson.

Murray was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson on Nov. 7, in a case that captivated Michael Jackson fans worldwide. Jackson died on June 25, 2009, of what was determined to be an overdose of sedatives and propofol.

Murray was accused by Judge Michael Pastor of propagating a “continuing series of lies” to Jackson’s friends, family, security team and various healthcare providers — including paramedics — that were “not designed to help his patient” but rather “to deceive and to give Dr. Murray a way out.” Pastor also called Murray’s recording of Jackson while the pop star was under heavy influence propofol an “insurance policy,” and called out Murray’s continuous supplying to Jackson of “staggering” amounts of the powerful painkiller and sedative a “clear violation of the patient-caregiver agreement.”

The Man in the Mirror: Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson show a labour of love Michael Jackson would have loved this, says Greg Phillinganes, the late singer’s long-time music director.Phillinganes is sitting on the stage at Montreal’s Bell Centre where Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson: The Immortal World Tour debuted to 15,000 spectators this past weekend, including Jackson’s mother, his three children and three of his brothers. Around Phillinganes, the crew is setting up for another show. On the floor, a contortionist practices handstands on a gigantic book.“He loved Cirque,” Phillinganes says about Jackson, who died in Los Angeles in June 2009. “He has seen all of their shows, at least twice, brought the kids, met the Cirque brass, visited headquarters — and when he did, they couldn’t pull him out of the costume wing.” (Photo: Cirque du Soleil)Related:Inside Cirque du Soleil’s Montreal headquarters

The Man in the Mirror: Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson show a labour of love
Michael Jackson would have loved this, says Greg Phillinganes, the late singer’s long-time music director.

Phillinganes is sitting on the stage at Montreal’s Bell Centre where Cirque du Soleil’s Michael Jackson: The Immortal World Tour debuted to 15,000 spectators this past weekend, including Jackson’s mother, his three children and three of his brothers. Around Phillinganes, the crew is setting up for another show. On the floor, a contortionist practices handstands on a gigantic book.

“He loved Cirque,” Phillinganes says about Jackson, who died in Los Angeles in June 2009. “He has seen all of their shows, at least twice, brought the kids, met the Cirque brass, visited headquarters — and when he did, they couldn’t pull him out of the costume wing.” (Photo: Cirque du Soleil)

Related:
Inside Cirque du Soleil’s Montreal headquarters

Prosecutors show picture of dead Michael Jackson as doctor’s trial opensGrim photos of Michael Jackson lying dead in a hospital bed juxtaposed with a picture of the “Thriller” singer rehearsing the day before his demise brought an emotional opening on Tuesday to the manslaughter trial of the doctor hired to care for him.In opening arguments two years after Jackson’s sudden death by drug overdose, prosecutor David Walgren told jurors that the pop star “literally put his life in the hands of Dr. Conrad Murray.”“That misplaced trust in the hands of Conrad Murray cost Michael Jackson his life,” Walgren added.Photo: This image taken from the prosecution courtroom evidence screen purports to show Michael Jackson lying on a hospital gurney in the screen grab from pool video during opening arguments in Dr. Conrad Murray’s trial in the death of  Michael Jackson in Los Angeles, September 27, 2011.

Prosecutors show picture of dead Michael Jackson as doctor’s trial opens
Grim photos of Michael Jackson lying dead in a hospital bed juxtaposed with a picture of the “Thriller” singer rehearsing the day before his demise brought an emotional opening on Tuesday to the manslaughter trial of the doctor hired to care for him.

In opening arguments two years after Jackson’s sudden death by drug overdose, prosecutor David Walgren told jurors that the pop star “literally put his life in the hands of Dr. Conrad Murray.”

“That misplaced trust in the hands of Conrad Murray cost Michael Jackson his life,” Walgren added.

Photo: This image taken from the prosecution courtroom evidence screen purports to show Michael Jackson lying on a hospital gurney in the screen grab from pool video during opening arguments in Dr. Conrad Murray’s trial in the death of  Michael Jackson in Los Angeles, September 27, 2011.