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National Post

npostlife:

This year, forget resolutions and adopt some brilliant lifehacksHere are 14 simple ways to have a better 2014, from a new way to shave, to whiter teeth, from unlocking your phone to getting engaged, to never hitting snooze again to wearing a crappy watch — make this year better by stealing the successful ways of others.[Illustration by Steve Murray/National Post]

npostlife:

This year, forget resolutions and adopt some brilliant lifehacks
Here are 14 simple ways to have a better 2014, from a new way to shave, to whiter teeth, from unlocking your phone to getting engaged, to never hitting snooze again to wearing a crappy watch — make this year better by stealing the successful ways of others.
[Illustration by Steve Murray/National Post]

nparts:

Cultural Lessons of 2013: Thor is the new SupermanThor smiles; naturally, even. The new Superman smiles with sad eyes, like it’s a bone thrown to the audience to let them know that this isn’t just a flying Batman. Thor battles the bad guys with a sense of fun, even though, and here’s the interesting part, he’s a warrior who surely kills people. So, do I have a double standard here? Why is it OK for fictional alien do-gooder No. 1 to kill people and not the other guy? Well, it’s all in the execution, so to speak. Superman unleashed holy hell in a dark, painfully contrived, no-win scenario, culminating in a disturbing snapping of a person’s neck. Thor threw his super-hammer at a rock monster in a daylight battle, smashing it to pieces, and then delivering a fun quip. Did that rock monster have a rock family? A little rock monster at home, wondering where rock daddy is? I don’t know. Who cares? It was gleeful and ludicrous and unreal, like a comic book. Bloodless and bright: natpo.st/1f0nkYS
[Illustration by Steve Murray]

nparts:

Cultural Lessons of 2013: Thor is the new Superman

Thor smiles; naturally, even. The new Superman smiles with sad eyes, like it’s a bone thrown to the audience to let them know that this isn’t just a flying Batman. Thor battles the bad guys with a sense of fun, even though, and here’s the interesting part, he’s a warrior who surely kills people. So, do I have a double standard here? Why is it OK for fictional alien do-gooder No. 1 to kill people and not the other guy? Well, it’s all in the execution, so to speak. Superman unleashed holy hell in a dark, painfully contrived, no-win scenario, culminating in a disturbing snapping of a person’s neck. Thor threw his super-hammer at a rock monster in a daylight battle, smashing it to pieces, and then delivering a fun quip. Did that rock monster have a rock family? A little rock monster at home, wondering where rock daddy is? I don’t know. Who cares? It was gleeful and ludicrous and unreal, like a comic book. Bloodless and bright: natpo.st/1f0nkYS

[Illustration by Steve Murray]

Today’s National Post front page, illustrated by Kagan McLeod. Full Nelson Mandela coverage.

Today’s National Post front page, illustrated by Kagan McLeod. Full Nelson Mandela coverage.

nparts:

The Giller of Gillers
On Tuesday, at a gala ceremony in Toronto, the Scotiabank Giller Prize will be awarded for the 20th time. There are prizes that offer more money (the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Non-Fiction) and prizes with a more illustrious history (The Governor General’s Literary Awards) but there’s no denying that this prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in honour of his late wife, journalist and editor Doris Giller, is (and has for a while been) the most prestigious literary award in Canada. It is not uncommon, in the minutes after the winner is announced, for the book’s publisher to place a call to the printer and order tens of thousands of additional copies. It is a life-changing award. Before we add one more name to the list  — Dan Vyleta, Craig Davidson, Dennis Bock, Lynn Coady and Lisa Moore are nominated for this year’s prize — books editor Mark Medley asked a cross-section of previous recipients to pick (or attempt to pick) their favourite Giller Prize-winning book from the last two decades: http://natpo.st/17xwitf

nparts:

The Giller of Gillers

On Tuesday, at a gala ceremony in Toronto, the Scotiabank Giller Prize will be awarded for the 20th time. There are prizes that offer more money (the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Non-Fiction) and prizes with a more illustrious history (The Governor General’s Literary Awards) but there’s no denying that this prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in honour of his late wife, journalist and editor Doris Giller, is (and has for a while been) the most prestigious literary award in Canada. It is not uncommon, in the minutes after the winner is announced, for the book’s publisher to place a call to the printer and order tens of thousands of additional copies. It is a life-changing award. Before we add one more name to the list  — Dan Vyleta, Craig Davidson, Dennis Bock, Lynn Coady and Lisa Moore are nominated for this year’s prize — books editor Mark Medley asked a cross-section of previous recipients to pick (or attempt to pick) their favourite Giller Prize-winning book from the last two decades: http://natpo.st/17xwitf

nparts:

Here’s the real Johnny Carson
Robert Fulford: Susan Forward, a California therapist, has made her reputation writing pop-psychology bestsellers about Men Who Hate Women, Toxic Parents and similar afflictions of family life. It’s odd to see her name crop up in a show-business memoir, Henry Bushkin’s Johnny Carson (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), but her point of view fits snugly into the melancholy but compulsively readable story that Bushkin tells: natpo.st/1eghTnk[Illustration by Steve Murray]

nparts:

Here’s the real Johnny Carson

Robert Fulford: Susan Forward, a California therapist, has made her reputation writing pop-psychology bestsellers about Men Who Hate Women, Toxic Parents and similar afflictions of family life. It’s odd to see her name crop up in a show-business memoir, Henry Bushkin’s Johnny Carson (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), but her point of view fits snugly into the melancholy but compulsively readable story that Bushkin tells: natpo.st/1eghTnk

[Illustration by Steve Murray]

How We Die Now: “Death renders all equal,” wrote Claudian. How each one of us relates to death, however, is individual, and always changing — as we mature; as we contemplate life, and death, around us; and as society changes. In this special series in the National Post, we present stories and columns looking at the different ways we see, and prepare for, the Great Equalizer. (Illustrations: Kagan McLeod)

How We Die Now: “Death renders all equal,” wrote Claudian. How each one of us relates to death, however, is individual, and always changing — as we mature; as we contemplate life, and death, around us; and as society changes. In this special series in the National Post, we present stories and columns looking at the different ways we see, and prepare for, the Great Equalizer. (Illustrations: Kagan McLeod)

Tagged with:  #news  #death  #Illustration  #art  #Kagan McLeod
Confessions of a cottage-hater: Why I left the lake for a blissful summer in the cityIn summers gone by, I gamely made the drive out to cottage country, mindlessly conforming to the societally imposed expectation that, come July and August, wholesome, patriotic Canadians instinctively long for evergreen vistas and the feeling of lake water on their dock-dangled toes. I was a cottage-hater living a lie. No more. (Illustration: Mike Faille / National Post)

Confessions of a cottage-hater: Why I left the lake for a blissful summer in the city
In summers gone by, I gamely made the drive out to cottage country, mindlessly conforming to the societally imposed expectation that, come July and August, wholesome, patriotic Canadians instinctively long for evergreen vistas and the feeling of lake water on their dock-dangled toes. I was a cottage-hater living a lie. No more. (Illustration: Mike Faille / National Post)

Gary Clement’s summer Twitter storiesCamp Mashup: Where your camp memories collide for an experience you’ll never forget… no mater how hard you try

Gary Clement’s summer Twitter stories
Camp Mashup: Where your camp memories collide for an experience you’ll never forget… no mater how hard you try

nationalpostsports:

Take care of them, America: Canada’s favourite sports hosts are heading south to work for FOX Sports. This is the only tribute to TSN’s Jay Onrait and Dan O’Toole you need to read. (Illustration: Chloe Cushman/National Post)

nationalpostsports:

Take care of them, America: Canada’s favourite sports hosts are heading south to work for FOX Sports. This is the only tribute to TSN’s Jay Onrait and Dan O’Toole you need to read. (Illustration: Chloe Cushman/National Post)

nparts:

Robert Fulford says Michael Richards is master of his domain in his episode of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. Find out why (and watch the episode) here: natpo.st/1cie9vK 

nparts:

Robert Fulford says Michael Richards is master of his domain in his episode of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.

Find out why (and watch the episode) here: natpo.st/1cie9vK 

nparts:

Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig combined their personal and professional lives to make Frances Ha: natpo.st/10wQO9P
[Illustration by Chloe Cushman]

nparts:

Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig combined their personal and professional lives to make Frances Ha: natpo.st/10wQO9P

[Illustration by Chloe Cushman]