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Google aims to bring Street View imaging to Galapagos Islands
Google wants to make it easier for you to virtually visit one of the world’s most famous remote animal-watching destinations, and the place that inspired Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution.

On Thursday, the Silicon Valley search engine giant announced it recently sent its Street View Trekker backpack camera system to the Galápagos Islands to capture panoramic images of the region’s sulfur mines, lava tunnels, lush forests and wondrous waters as well as the inimitable wildlife that calls this UNESCO World Heritage Site home.

The photos, which were snapped between May 6 and 17, will be available on Google Maps later this year.

Google Earth Outreach has collaborated with the Charles Darwin Foundation, a non-profit organization located in Galápagos off the coast of Ecuador in South America, whose mission is to preserve the region’s enchanting landscapes and species. (Google)

Sweden language officials express ‘displeasure’ after Google objects to word ‘ogooglebar’Sweden’s language watchdog has accused Google of trying to control the Swedish language, in a dispute over the definition of the term “ungoogleable.”The Swedish Language Council unveiled its annual list of new Swedish words in December. Among them was a term Swedes began using in 2012: ogooglebar (or “ungoogleable”).The list is compiled of words that are not in the Swedish dictionary but have entered common parlance.

Sweden language officials express ‘displeasure’ after Google objects to word ‘ogooglebar’
Sweden’s language watchdog has accused Google of trying to control the Swedish language, in a dispute over the definition of the term “ungoogleable.”

The Swedish Language Council unveiled its annual list of new Swedish words in December. Among them was a term Swedes began using in 2012: ogooglebar (or “ungoogleable”).

The list is compiled of words that are not in the Swedish dictionary but have entered common parlance.

Tagged with:  #news  #Google  #language  #Sweden  #linguistics
Google has upgraded its map of North Korea to include roads, monuments to Dear Leader and the nearest gulagGoogle has helped fill the gap in one of the last remaining information black holes in the world by releasing a detailed map of North Korea that adds street names, monuments — and its notorious prison camps.Information on streets, parks, monuments and train stops in the capital of Pyongyang showed up on Google Maps’ formerly blank map of North Korea this week. Until Tuesday, the isolated communist regime was the last place on Google Maps where no data was available beyond the capital city’s name. (Google Maps)

Google has upgraded its map of North Korea to include roads, monuments to Dear Leader and the nearest gulag
Google has helped fill the gap in one of the last remaining information black holes in the world by releasing a detailed map of North Korea that adds street names, monuments — and its notorious prison camps.

Information on streets, parks, monuments and train stops in the capital of Pyongyang showed up on Google Maps’ formerly blank map of North Korea this week. Until Tuesday, the isolated communist regime was the last place on Google Maps where no data was available beyond the capital city’s name. (Google Maps)

Google unveils 360-degree panoramic images of Antarctica
Google Inc. unveiled a new series of photographs Tuesday showcasing stunning panoramic views of various Antarctic historical sites, landmarks and landscapes, including the homes of some of the first explorers.

Following up on the company’s initial Street View project of Antarctica back in September 2010, the new series of images includes the South Pole TelescopeCape Royds Adélie Penguin Rookery , the Ceremonial South Pole and the huts of Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott.

Ernie Coombs, known to millions of Canadians as “Mr. Dressup” was celebrated in a Google doodle todayErnie Coombs, known to Canada as Mr. Dressup, would have celebrated his 85th birthday today were he still alive. The perennial children’s entertainer was celebrated today in a Google doodle.
Coombs died of a stroke on September 18, 2001.
Coombs was known for his role as the titular character on the show “Mr. Dressup” during its almost 30-year run from 1967 to 1996. Almost as popular as Coombs himself were Mr. Dressup’s two puppet friends Casey and Finnegan who can be seen in the Google image behind Coombs in the magical “tickle trunk.”

Ernie Coombs, known to millions of Canadians as “Mr. Dressup” was celebrated in a Google doodle today
Ernie Coombs, known to Canada as Mr. Dressup, would have celebrated his 85th birthday today were he still alive. The perennial children’s entertainer was celebrated today in a Google doodle.

Coombs died of a stroke on September 18, 2001.

Coombs was known for his role as the titular character on the show “Mr. Dressup” during its almost 30-year run from 1967 to 1996. Almost as popular as Coombs himself were Mr. Dressup’s two puppet friends Casey and Finnegan who can be seen in the Google image behind Coombs in the magical “tickle trunk.”

Week in reviewPolitical cartoonist Gary Clement takes a look at the week gone by

Week in review
Political cartoonist Gary Clement takes a look at the week gone by

Graphic: Sizing up Google’s earnings stumbleGoogle lost US$15.8-billion after dismal quarterly results. We put the massive stumble in perspective. (Illustration: Richard Johnson/National Post)

Graphic: Sizing up Google’s earnings stumble
Google lost US$15.8-billion after dismal quarterly results. We put the massive stumble in perspective. (Illustration: Richard Johnson/National Post)

Tagged with:  #news  #business  #finance  #graphic  #Google
Herman Melville books celebrated by Google doodle on 161st anniversary of Moby Dick’s releaseHerman Melville’s books were the focus of Thursday’s Google doodle, which celebrated the 161st anniversary of Moby Dick’s release.Melville, often thought of as one of the greatest American authors, was largely unheralded in his lifetime for his later work, such as Moby Dick, going mostly unread and unrecognized while he lived. It was not until the beginning of the 20th century that his works, specifically Moby Dick, got widespread recognition.

Herman Melville books celebrated by Google doodle on 161st anniversary of Moby Dick’s release
Herman Melville’s books were the focus of Thursday’s Google doodle, which celebrated the 161st anniversary of Moby Dick’s release.

Melville, often thought of as one of the greatest American authors, was largely unheralded in his lifetime for his later work, such as Moby Dick, going mostly unread and unrecognized while he lived. It was not until the beginning of the 20th century that his works, specifically Moby Dick, got widespread recognition.

Hartland, New Brunswick covered bridge celebrated in today’s Google Doodle
Hartland, New Brunswick’s covered bridge got a Google Doodle today to mark the 111th anniversary of its opening.

The 391m-long covered bridge — the longest in the world — officially opened July 4, 1901, and has spanned the St. John River ever since. (Google; Saint John Telegraph Journal)

Google sends fleet of planes to create 3D map of Earth
Google is deploying a fleet of small, camera-equipped airplanes above several cities, the Internet search company’s latest step in its ambitious and sometimes controversial plan to create a digital map of the world.

Google plans to release the first three-dimensional maps for several cities by the end of the year, the company said at a news conference.

“We’re trying to create the illusion that you’re just flying over the city, almost as if you were in your own personal helicopter,” said Peter Birch, a product manager for Google Earth. (Photos: Google)

Startup backed by James Cameron, Larry Page planning asteroid mining?A cryptic press release issued last week suggested a blockbuster team of investors — including Google Inc. co-founder Larry Page and Canadian film maker James Cameron — is set to back a space exploration venture that could have plans to mine asteroids.The release contained few details of the team’s plans but suggested more would be revealed Tuesday morning during a news conference at Seattle’s Museum of Flight.“The company will overlay two critical sectors — space exploration and natural resources — to add trillions of dollars to the global GDP,” the release said, adding that the startup would “create a new industry and new definition of ‘natural resources.’” (Photo:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Reuters)

Startup backed by James Cameron, Larry Page planning asteroid mining?
A cryptic press release issued last week suggested a blockbuster team of investors — including Google Inc. co-founder Larry Page and Canadian film maker James Cameron — is set to back a space exploration venture that could have plans to mine asteroids.

The release contained few details of the team’s plans but suggested more would be revealed Tuesday morning during a news conference at Seattle’s Museum of Flight.

“The company will overlay two critical sectors — space exploration and natural resources — to add trillions of dollars to the global GDP,” the release said, adding that the startup would “create a new industry and new definition of ‘natural resources.’” (Photo:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Reuters)

Is Google evil? Not reallyGoogle Inc. is evil. Or maybe it isn’t. Perhaps no other technology company in history has worked quite so hard to cultivate a wholesome, trusting image as Google, what with its primary coloured-search engine, the stories of free M&M’s candies for employees and its famous “Don’t be evil” corporate mantra.Indeed, beyond its playful branding, Google has spent much of the past decade casting itself in the role of Defender of the Open Internet, hero to users, ally of advertisers and enemy of all that is soulless and wrong in the dark corners of the Web.But lately, it seems, perceptions of Google have changed. There are those who now see Google as an anti-hero, an overgrown bully, drunk on its own power, collecting the data of millions of users in an effort to line its own pockets, privacy be damned.In a word, evil.Which is utter nonsense. This week, alarm bells went off throughout the technology industry and the blogosphere when Google announced a series of updates to its privacy policies. At the core of the changes are Google’s plans to consolidate most of its 70-odd privacy rules that govern its various properties — including YouTube, Gmail, and its search engine — into a single, overarching Google privacy policy. (Photo: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

Is Google evil? Not really
Google Inc. is evil. Or maybe it isn’t. Perhaps no other technology company in history has worked quite so hard to cultivate a wholesome, trusting image as Google, what with its primary coloured-search engine, the stories of free M&M’s candies for employees and its famous “Don’t be evil” corporate mantra.

Indeed, beyond its playful branding, Google has spent much of the past decade casting itself in the role of Defender of the Open Internet, hero to users, ally of advertisers and enemy of all that is soulless and wrong in the dark corners of the Web.

But lately, it seems, perceptions of Google have changed. There are those who now see Google as an anti-hero, an overgrown bully, drunk on its own power, collecting the data of millions of users in an effort to line its own pockets, privacy be damned.

In a word, evil.

Which is utter nonsense. This week, alarm bells went off throughout the technology industry and the blogosphere when Google announced a series of updates to its privacy policies. At the core of the changes are Google’s plans to consolidate most of its 70-odd privacy rules that govern its various properties — including YouTube, Gmail, and its search engine — into a single, overarching Google privacy policy. (Photo: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

Tagged with:  #technology  #Google  #privacy
The Arab Awakening: The ex-Google executive behind Egypt’s online revolutionThe Arab Spring began a year ago, ushering in an era of revolution and protest. In the second of a six-part series, the National Post’s Peter Goodspeed charts Egypt’s route from “day of rage” to the ballot boxDuring the early days of Egypt’s revolution, the once-powerful and much-feared interior minister, Habib al-Adly, reportedly dismissed Cairo’s protesters as “a bunch of incognizant, ineffective young people.”It was, perhaps, the most erroneous assessment of the entire Arab Spring.Mr. Habib obviously had not met Wael Ghonim, the former Google executive, computer engineer and Internet activist who unwittingly became the unofficial spokesman for Egypt’s revolutionaries.“I’m not a hero. I want to tell every mother and every father who lost a child, I am sorry. But this is not our mistake. I swear to God, it is not our mistake. It is the mistake of every one of those in power who doesn’t want to let go of it.” (Photo: Dylan Martinez/Reuters)

The Arab Awakening: The ex-Google executive behind Egypt’s online revolution
The Arab Spring began a year ago, ushering in an era of revolution and protest. In the second of a six-part series, the National Post’s Peter Goodspeed charts Egypt’s route from “day of rage” to the ballot box

During the early days of Egypt’s revolution, the once-powerful and much-feared interior minister, Habib al-Adly, reportedly dismissed Cairo’s protesters as “a bunch of incognizant, ineffective young people.”

It was, perhaps, the most erroneous assessment of the entire Arab Spring.

Mr. Habib obviously had not met Wael Ghonim, the former Google executive, computer engineer and Internet activist who unwittingly became the unofficial spokesman for Egypt’s revolutionaries.

“I’m not a hero. I want to tell every mother and every father who lost a child, I am sorry. But this is not our mistake. I swear to God, it is not our mistake. It is the mistake of every one of those in power who doesn’t want to let go of it.” (Photo: Dylan Martinez/Reuters)

Rock out with Google’s playable Les Paul “Doodle”For those about to rock, Google Inc. salutes you. To honour the legendary recording artist and electric guitar pioneer Les Paul, Google has created a special “Doodle” to mark what would have been the rock and roll trailblazer’s 96th birthday.On Thursday, the logo on Google’s homepage – also known as a “Google Doodle” – will be replaced by an interactive Les Paul electric guitar, one visitors can actually use to rock out and record their own music.

Rock out with Google’s playable Les Paul “Doodle”
For those about to rock, Google Inc. salutes you. To honour the legendary recording artist and electric guitar pioneer Les Paul, Google has created a special “Doodle” to mark what would have been the rock and roll trailblazer’s 96th birthday.

On Thursday, the logo on Google’s homepage – also known as a “Google Doodle” – will be replaced by an interactive Les Paul electric guitar, one visitors can actually use to rock out and record their own music.