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‘How sick is that?’ Family outraged after dating website ad on Facebook uses photo of Rehtaeh Parsons
The family of Rehtaeh Parsons expressed outrage on Wednesday after a dating website ad on Facebook used a picture of the 17-year-old bullying victim.
The Nova Scotia girl died after attempting suicide in April.
The ad featured a picture of Parsons under the heading, “Find Love in Canada! Meet Canadian girls and women for friendship, dating or relationships.”
Facebook has apologized for featuring the ad, claiming it was a “gross violation” of the company’s policies and has been removed.
“This is an extremely unfortunate example of an advertiser scraping an image from the Internet and using it in their ad campaign,” a spokesperson said in the emailed statement. (Photo: lonechat.com / Facebook)

‘How sick is that?’ Family outraged after dating website ad on Facebook uses photo of Rehtaeh Parsons

The family of Rehtaeh Parsons expressed outrage on Wednesday after a dating website ad on Facebook used a picture of the 17-year-old bullying victim.

The Nova Scotia girl died after attempting suicide in April.

The ad featured a picture of Parsons under the heading, “Find Love in Canada! Meet Canadian girls and women for friendship, dating or relationships.”

Facebook has apologized for featuring the ad, claiming it was a “gross violation” of the company’s policies and has been removed.

“This is an extremely unfortunate example of an advertiser scraping an image from the Internet and using it in their ad campaign,” a spokesperson said in the emailed statement. (Photo: lonechat.com / Facebook)

npostlife:

Is Facebook making young adults unhappy?A new U.S. study published this month suggests just that — that the more time a young person spends logging onto and surfing the social media site, the more likely they are to report feelings of unhappiness in the moment and overall. Do you agree? Disagree?[Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images files]

npostlife:

Is Facebook making young adults unhappy?
A new U.S. study published this month suggests just that — that the more time a young person spends logging onto and surfing the social media site, the more likely they are to report feelings of unhappiness in the moment and overall. Do you agree? Disagree?
[Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images files]

Instagram’s ‘suicide note’: Users furious over photo-sharing service’s privacy changesIn what photography fans are labeling a “suicide note,” Facebook’s Instagram photo-sharing service revealed a new privacy policy that states it may sell information and photos to advertisers without compensation or notification to users.The announcement was quickly met with anger, as users threaten to shut down their accounts and switch to other photo-sharing services like Flickr, while others used the hashtag #quitstagram.“To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you,” Instagram said in a blog post.The changes are set to take effect on January 16, 2013. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Instagram’s ‘suicide note’: Users furious over photo-sharing service’s privacy changes
In what photography fans are labeling a “suicide note,” Facebook’s Instagram photo-sharing service revealed a new privacy policy that states it may sell information and photos to advertisers without compensation or notification to users.

The announcement was quickly met with anger, as users threaten to shut down their accounts and switch to other photo-sharing services like Flickr, while others used the hashtag #quitstagram.

“To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you,” Instagram said in a blog post.

The changes are set to take effect on January 16, 2013. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Fake Facebook privacy notice circulates in response to proposed voting changeslatest privacy preoccupation to grip Facebook users appears to have been provoked by changes to the social media website’s data use policy made last week.Many users have been posting notices to their Facebook walls purporting to protect their copyright, stating in part, “In response to the new Facebook guidelines, I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, professional photos and videos etc.”However, what Facebook does with information or materials shared on its site is governed by its own data use policy, which users agree to when they sign up for the site. Simply posting a notice to your wall cannot alter those terms. (AP Photo/dapd, Joerg Koch, File)

Fake Facebook privacy notice circulates in response to proposed voting changes
latest privacy preoccupation to grip Facebook users appears to have been provoked by changes to the social media website’s data use policy made last week.

Many users have been posting notices to their Facebook walls purporting to protect their copyright, stating in part, “In response to the new Facebook guidelines, I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, professional photos and videos etc.”

However, what Facebook does with information or materials shared on its site is governed by its own data use policy, which users agree to when they sign up for the site. Simply posting a notice to your wall cannot alter those terms. (AP Photo/dapd, Joerg Koch, File)

Tagged with:  #news  #Facebook  #privacy
nationalpostsports:

Don’t get bent out of shape about the Olympics: Join our new National Post Olympics Facebook page where you can find more photos like this, the latest news from the Games, and commentary from our best writers in London.
If you like what you see on our Tumblr - why not try us on Facebook? Really. We’re fun: http://on.fb.me/P9XfY5

nationalpostsports:

Don’t get bent out of shape about the Olympics: Join our new National Post Olympics Facebook page where you can find more photos like this, the latest news from the Games, and commentary from our best writers in London.

If you like what you see on our Tumblr - why not try us on Facebook? Really. We’re fun: http://on.fb.me/P9XfY5

Fans, defenders line up to support ‘inspirational’ Luka Rocco Magnotta on FacebookFor years, occasional porn actor and escort Luka Rocco Magnotta mined the Internet in a bid for fame, or at least, infamy. But the respect, the attention he desired, never came.That changed in late May when Magnotta was accused of one of the most disturbing crimes in recent memory, the dismemberment slaying of Concordia student Jun Lin. Magnotta’s face, stylized with makeup and Photoshop, was splashed on screens across the globe during an international manhunt. His name, which he so desperately attempted to link to Karla Homolka in web postings over the years, was finally being mentioned in the same sentences as Paul Bernardo and other famed sex killers.And like many of those famed killers, Magnotta has garnered a collection of “fans.” Some of them say they love him, say he has been set up for a murder, that they want to have sex with him, maybe just get a tattoo of him. Others say he is mentally ill, needs help or they feel sympathetic to his desire to find fame. And some say it was Magnotta in that snuff film that purportedly shows the slaying of Lin, the sex acts performed to his corpse — yet they still find the alleged killer “inspirational.”

Fans, defenders line up to support ‘inspirational’ Luka Rocco Magnotta on Facebook
For years, occasional porn actor and escort Luka Rocco Magnotta mined the Internet in a bid for fame, or at least, infamy. But the respect, the attention he desired, never came.

That changed in late May when Magnotta was accused of one of the most disturbing crimes in recent memory, the dismemberment slaying of Concordia student Jun Lin. Magnotta’s face, stylized with makeup and Photoshop, was splashed on screens across the globe during an international manhunt. His name, which he so desperately attempted to link to Karla Homolka in web postings over the years, was finally being mentioned in the same sentences as Paul Bernardo and other famed sex killers.

And like many of those famed killers, Magnotta has garnered a collection of “fans.” Some of them say they love him, say he has been set up for a murder, that they want to have sex with him, maybe just get a tattoo of him. Others say he is mentally ill, needs help or they feel sympathetic to his desire to find fame. And some say it was Magnotta in that snuff film that purportedly shows the slaying of Lin, the sex acts performed to his corpse — yet they still find the alleged killer “inspirational.”

nparts:

The Quantified Month: May
Sarah Lazarovic renders May’s most notable events in convenient chart form.

nparts:

The Quantified Month: May

Sarah Lazarovic renders May’s most notable events in convenient chart form.

Facebook buys Instagram for US$1-billionAhead of its blockbuster initial public offering, Facebook bolstered its photo-sharing features Monday by acquiring photo-sharing mobile app Instagram in a US$1-billion cash and stock deal.Mark Zuckerberg, who co-created Facebook from his dorm room at Harvard University in 2004, posted the following statement on his profile page:"We think the fact that Instagram is connected to other services beyond Facebook is an important part of the experience. We plan on keeping features like the ability to post to other social networks, the ability to not share your Instagrams on Facebook if you want, and the ability to have followers and follow people separately from your friends on Facebook."

Facebook buys Instagram for US$1-billion
Ahead of its blockbuster initial public offering, Facebook bolstered its photo-sharing features Monday by acquiring photo-sharing mobile app Instagram in a US$1-billion cash and stock deal.

Mark Zuckerberg, who co-created Facebook from his dorm room at Harvard University in 2004, posted the following statement on his profile page:

"We think the fact that Instagram is connected to other services beyond Facebook is an important part of the experience. We plan on keeping features like the ability to post to other social networks, the ability to not share your Instagrams on Facebook if you want, and the ability to have followers and follow people separately from your friends on Facebook."

Tagged with:  #news  #technology  #Facebook  #Instagram  #mobile
Facebook files for US$5-billion IPOFacebook Inc. founder Mark Zuckerberg wants to change the world, conquer Wall Street and usher in a new dawn for Silicon Valley, just don’t expect him to relinquish any control over his company along the way.Wednesday afternoon, the 27-year-old Mr. Zuckerberg laid out in black and white his mission statement for how Facebook will revolutionize human interaction on the Internet, in full public view for the first time, as the Palo Alto, California-based company finally announced plans to hold a US$5-billion initial public offering (IPO).For Mr. Zuckerberg, the filing represents the culmination of a journey that began almost exactly eight years ago when he created a social networking site known as “The Facebook” in his Harvard University dorm room, and has seen him become the target of high profile lawsuits, the subject of a Hollywood biopic and the youngest billionaire on the planet.
If the offering hits the higher end of its range — valuing the company at about US$100-billion — Mr. Zuckerberg would be worth more than $28-billion, making him one of the ten richest people in the world.  Facebook’s IPO also portends to turns thousands of its employees into millionaires, and several into billionaires, and further solidifies the social networking giant as one of the key power brokers in the digital age.With more than 845 million active users each month, Facebook is the default home on the Web for nearly 14% of the world’s population and one of a handful of companies — along with Apple Inc., Google Inc. and Twitter Inc. — in a position to shape the future of the social Web and reap the benefits of the billions of advertising dollars flowing onto the Internet each year. (Photo: Scott Eells/Bloomberg)

Facebook files for US$5-billion IPO
Facebook Inc. founder Mark Zuckerberg wants to change the world, conquer Wall Street and usher in a new dawn for Silicon Valley, just don’t expect him to relinquish any control over his company along the way.

Wednesday afternoon, the 27-year-old Mr. Zuckerberg laid out in black and white his mission statement for how Facebook will revolutionize human interaction on the Internet, in full public view for the first time, as the Palo Alto, California-based company finally announced plans to hold a US$5-billion initial public offering (IPO).

For Mr. Zuckerberg, the filing represents the culmination of a journey that began almost exactly eight years ago when he created a social networking site known as “The Facebook” in his Harvard University dorm room, and has seen him become the target of high profile lawsuits, the subject of a Hollywood biopic and the youngest billionaire on the planet.

If the offering hits the higher end of its range — valuing the company at about US$100-billion — Mr. Zuckerberg would be worth more than $28-billion, making him one of the ten richest people in the world.  Facebook’s IPO also portends to turns thousands of its employees into millionaires, and several into billionaires, and further solidifies the social networking giant as one of the key power brokers in the digital age.

With more than 845 million active users each month, Facebook is the default home on the Web for nearly 14% of the world’s population and one of a handful of companies — along with Apple Inc., Google Inc. and Twitter Inc. — in a position to shape the future of the social Web and reap the benefits of the billions of advertising dollars flowing onto the Internet each year. (Photo: Scott Eells/Bloomberg)

Breastfeeding mom takes on Facebook nudity policyFacebook and breastfeeding activists are engaged in a battle over the posting of photographs that show mothers feeding their babies.The latest incident happened Saturday, when she was sent a written warning that a photo of her and her two-year-old daughter Chloe, who was breastfeeding at the time, was considered “sexually explicit.” Facebook has a strict nudity policy.Later that day, a two-year-old photo of her feeding her now four-year-old daughter, Sophie, was also deleted. Kwasnica was then banned from the site for three days.“Facebook should just leave breastfeeding photos alone,” Kwasnica said. “(Breastfeeding is) not pornographic. It’s not obscene. It’s a normal human function.” (Photo: Bryanna Bradley/Montreal Gazette)

Breastfeeding mom takes on Facebook nudity policy
Facebook and breastfeeding activists are engaged in a battle over the posting of photographs that show mothers feeding their babies.

The latest incident happened Saturday, when she was sent a written warning that a photo of her and her two-year-old daughter Chloe, who was breastfeeding at the time, was considered “sexually explicit.”

Facebook has a strict nudity policy.

Later that day, a two-year-old photo of her feeding her now four-year-old daughter, Sophie, was also deleted. Kwasnica was then banned from the site for three days.

“Facebook should just leave breastfeeding photos alone,” Kwasnica said. “(Breastfeeding is) not pornographic. It’s not obscene. It’s a normal human function.” (Photo: Bryanna Bradley/Montreal Gazette)

The Arab Awakening: The ex-Google executive behind Egypt’s online revolutionThe Arab Spring began a year ago, ushering in an era of revolution and protest. In the second of a six-part series, the National Post’s Peter Goodspeed charts Egypt’s route from “day of rage” to the ballot boxDuring the early days of Egypt’s revolution, the once-powerful and much-feared interior minister, Habib al-Adly, reportedly dismissed Cairo’s protesters as “a bunch of incognizant, ineffective young people.”It was, perhaps, the most erroneous assessment of the entire Arab Spring.Mr. Habib obviously had not met Wael Ghonim, the former Google executive, computer engineer and Internet activist who unwittingly became the unofficial spokesman for Egypt’s revolutionaries.“I’m not a hero. I want to tell every mother and every father who lost a child, I am sorry. But this is not our mistake. I swear to God, it is not our mistake. It is the mistake of every one of those in power who doesn’t want to let go of it.” (Photo: Dylan Martinez/Reuters)

The Arab Awakening: The ex-Google executive behind Egypt’s online revolution
The Arab Spring began a year ago, ushering in an era of revolution and protest. In the second of a six-part series, the National Post’s Peter Goodspeed charts Egypt’s route from “day of rage” to the ballot box

During the early days of Egypt’s revolution, the once-powerful and much-feared interior minister, Habib al-Adly, reportedly dismissed Cairo’s protesters as “a bunch of incognizant, ineffective young people.”

It was, perhaps, the most erroneous assessment of the entire Arab Spring.

Mr. Habib obviously had not met Wael Ghonim, the former Google executive, computer engineer and Internet activist who unwittingly became the unofficial spokesman for Egypt’s revolutionaries.

“I’m not a hero. I want to tell every mother and every father who lost a child, I am sorry. But this is not our mistake. I swear to God, it is not our mistake. It is the mistake of every one of those in power who doesn’t want to let go of it.” (Photo: Dylan Martinez/Reuters)