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National Post

Rob Ford’s drunken, Jamaican-English-laced rant, translated
On Monday, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was videotaped in a bizarre exchange at a Toronto fast food restaurant that is notable not only for the mayor’s drunkenness, but for his liberal use of Jamaican English.
Through careful analysis of the audio — and translation via sources in Jamaica — the National Post presents this approximate transcript of Mr. Ford’s exchange with an unknown citizen, along with explanations. It is worth noting that this is the first time Mr. Ford has ever been seen to inject his public speech with Jamaican expressions, or even exhibit any knowledge of Jamaican English: http://natpo.st/1cSt13N

Rob Ford’s drunken, Jamaican-English-laced rant, translated

On Monday, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was videotaped in a bizarre exchange at a Toronto fast food restaurant that is notable not only for the mayor’s drunkenness, but for his liberal use of Jamaican English.

Through careful analysis of the audio — and translation via sources in Jamaica — the National Post presents this approximate transcript of Mr. Ford’s exchange with an unknown citizen, along with explanations.

It is worth noting that this is the first time Mr. Ford has ever been seen to inject his public speech with Jamaican expressions, or even exhibit any knowledge of Jamaican English: http://natpo.st/1cSt13N

Grant student’s request to avoid women for religious reasons, prof told 
After refusing to honour a male student’s request to be separated from his female classmates for religious reasons, a York University professor has found himself at odds with administrators who assert he broke their “obligation to accommodate.”
“It represents a great leap backwards,” said sociology professor J. Paul Grayson. “When I was a student, you couldn’t have gotten away with that — it wouldn’t even have been considered.”
The issue arose last September in the opening days of SOCI 2030, an online course taught by Mr. Grayson.
A student, who remains nameless due to privacy reasons, asked to be counted out of a scheduled group project due to the course’s heavy preponderance of female students.
“One of the main reasons that I have chosen internet courses to complete my BA is due to my firm religious beliefs, and part of that is the intermingling between men and women,” he wrote, adding “it will not be possible for me to meet in public with a group of women (the majority of my group) to complete some of these tasks.” (Photo: Tyler Anderson/National Post/Files)

Grant student’s request to avoid women for religious reasons, prof told 

After refusing to honour a male student’s request to be separated from his female classmates for religious reasons, a York University professor has found himself at odds with administrators who assert he broke their “obligation to accommodate.”

“It represents a great leap backwards,” said sociology professor J. Paul Grayson. “When I was a student, you couldn’t have gotten away with that — it wouldn’t even have been considered.”

The issue arose last September in the opening days of SOCI 2030, an online course taught by Mr. Grayson.

A student, who remains nameless due to privacy reasons, asked to be counted out of a scheduled group project due to the course’s heavy preponderance of female students.

“One of the main reasons that I have chosen internet courses to complete my BA is due to my firm religious beliefs, and part of that is the intermingling between men and women,” he wrote, adding “it will not be possible for me to meet in public with a group of women (the majority of my group) to complete some of these tasks.” (Photo: Tyler Anderson/National Post/Files)

Nearly 24 hours buried in snow: Ontario man, 70, rescued from snowdrift a day after going missing
A 70-year-old Leamington man who disappeared during a snowstorm earlier this week has been found alive after spending almost a day in his truck, buried in the snow.
John Friesen was last seen about 4:30 p.m. Monday after leaving his home in the southwestern Ontario community in his pick-up truck.
Friesen and his vehicle were found after he spent a night and much of the next day buried in a snowdrift in frigid temperatures.
“All you could see was the red lens from the tail light,” OPP Sgt. Shawn Diewold told the Windsor Star. “You’re hoping for the best, but just preparing for the worst.” (Photo: JASON KRYK/The Windsor Star)

Nearly 24 hours buried in snow: Ontario man, 70, rescued from snowdrift a day after going missing

A 70-year-old Leamington man who disappeared during a snowstorm earlier this week has been found alive after spending almost a day in his truck, buried in the snow.

John Friesen was last seen about 4:30 p.m. Monday after leaving his home in the southwestern Ontario community in his pick-up truck.

Friesen and his vehicle were found after he spent a night and much of the next day buried in a snowdrift in frigid temperatures.

“All you could see was the red lens from the tail light,” OPP Sgt. Shawn Diewold told the Windsor Star. “You’re hoping for the best, but just preparing for the worst.” (Photo: JASON KRYK/The Windsor Star)

‘From early flight to people on the moon’: Canada’s oldest ‘super-centenarian’ celebrates 113th birthday in B.C.
Canada’s oldest citizen — and the country’s last living link to the Victorian era — celebrated her 113th birthday just before Christmas at a B.C. residential hospital.
And after a year in which Merle Barwis’s extreme longevity placed her among the 13 oldest people on the planet and among the 10 longest-lived Canadians of all time.
But life for the U.S.-born, Saskatchewan-raised Barwis still involves more than merely reaching such impressive milestones. Her continuing reign as the country’s senior “super-centenarian” — that’s anyone 110 years of age or older — includes frequent visits from family at the suburban Victoria health centre where she lives, special events such as the Dec. 23 birthday party held in her honour, and a regular rekindling of memories over cups of coffee or the occasional bottle of beer.
“If you’re old you’re old, if you’re young you’re young. What can you do about it?” (Photo: Lyle Stafford / Postmedia News)

‘From early flight to people on the moon’: Canada’s oldest ‘super-centenarian’ celebrates 113th birthday in B.C.

Canada’s oldest citizen — and the country’s last living link to the Victorian era — celebrated her 113th birthday just before Christmas at a B.C. residential hospital.

And after a year in which Merle Barwis’s extreme longevity placed her among the 13 oldest people on the planet and among the 10 longest-lived Canadians of all time.

But life for the U.S.-born, Saskatchewan-raised Barwis still involves more than merely reaching such impressive milestones. Her continuing reign as the country’s senior “super-centenarian” — that’s anyone 110 years of age or older — includes frequent visits from family at the suburban Victoria health centre where she lives, special events such as the Dec. 23 birthday party held in her honour, and a regular rekindling of memories over cups of coffee or the occasional bottle of beer.

“If you’re old you’re old, if you’re young you’re young. What can you do about it?” (Photo: Lyle Stafford / Postmedia News)

At least 4,000 aboriginal children died in residential schools, commission finds
Thousands of Canada’s aboriginal children died in residential schools that failed to keep them safe from fires, protected from abusers, and healthy from deadly disease, a commission into the saga has found.
So far, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has determined that more than 4,000 of the school children died.
But that figure is based on partial federal government records, and commission officials expect the number to rise as its researchers get their hands in future months on much more complete files from Library and Archives Canada and elsewhere.
The disturbing discovery has cast a new light on the century-long school system that scarred the country’s First Nations peoples.
Evidence has been compiled that shows residential school children faced a grave risk of death.
“Aboriginal kids’ lives just didn’t seem as worthy as non-aboriginal kids,” Kimberly Murray, executive director of the commission, said in an interview.
“The death rate was much higher than non-indigenous kids.” (Photo: Anglican Church Archives, Old Sun)

At least 4,000 aboriginal children died in residential schools, commission finds

Thousands of Canada’s aboriginal children died in residential schools that failed to keep them safe from fires, protected from abusers, and healthy from deadly disease, a commission into the saga has found.

So far, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has determined that more than 4,000 of the school children died.

But that figure is based on partial federal government records, and commission officials expect the number to rise as its researchers get their hands in future months on much more complete files from Library and Archives Canada and elsewhere.

The disturbing discovery has cast a new light on the century-long school system that scarred the country’s First Nations peoples.

Evidence has been compiled that shows residential school children faced a grave risk of death.

“Aboriginal kids’ lives just didn’t seem as worthy as non-aboriginal kids,” Kimberly Murray, executive director of the commission, said in an interview.

“The death rate was much higher than non-indigenous kids.” (Photo: Anglican Church Archives, Old Sun)

Not to shock anyone, but it’s really, really cold in much of Canada today. (Photo: Darren Calabrese/National Post)

Not to shock anyone, but it’s really, really cold in much of Canada today. (Photo: Darren Calabrese/National Post)

From ‘toque’ to ‘mickey,’ ten Canadianisms that leave other English speakers utterly confused

Your non-Canadian friends will have no idea what you’re talking about if you ask them for a ‘two four’ of Budweiser, or a ‘mickey’ of vodka.

Toque: Used by 100% of Canadians

Virtually every culture with both cold weather and access to sheep has some national variant of the knit cap.  The Afghans have the pakol, the U.S. Coast Guard supplies its crews with “watch caps” and Canadians, for half the year, wear “toques.” But while this was the only word on the survey that obtained unanimous usage among the Canadians, a majority of the non-Canadians said they had never even heard of it.

Pencil Crayon: Used by 96% of Canadians

Americans call them “colored pencils” and Brits call them “colouring pencils,” but despite what Canadians have stuck firmly to the above term, which Jules Sherred suspects is the result of mashing the English “coloured pencils” with the French “crayon de couleur.” A mere 14% of Americans recognized the term.

Mickey: Used by 88% of Canadians

A 375 ml bottle of liquor. In the United States, the term “mickey” is slang term for a date rape drug, and 69% of Americans were unaware of its more benign Canadian usage. Mickey is actually one of a series of uniquely Canadian booze measurements revealed by the survey. “Two four” (a case of 24 beers), “twenty sixer” (a 750 ml bottle of  liquor) and “forty-pounder” (a 1.14 liter bottle of liquor) were all virtually unknown outside the Great White North.

Tagged with:  #animals  #elk  #Banff  #Canada  #Christmas
Top court strikes down anti-prostitution laws: Brothels could be reality in Canada by Christmas 2014
Canada’s highest court has declared prostitution laws unconstitutional and has given Parliament a year to make them Charter-compliant should it wish to continue to impose limits on the sex trade.
It means being caught in a bawdy-house, living off the profits of another’s prostitution and soliciting sex in public will remain crimes until December 2014, but that legal brothels could be a reality in Canada by next Christmas should Parliament decide to do nothing.
In a landmark, unanimous ruling Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada found bawdy-house laws that make it a crime to be caught unlawfully in what is essentially a brothel are “grossly disproportionate” to the intent of the law, which is to prevent community nuisance.

Top court strikes down anti-prostitution laws: Brothels could be reality in Canada by Christmas 2014

Canada’s highest court has declared prostitution laws unconstitutional and has given Parliament a year to make them Charter-compliant should it wish to continue to impose limits on the sex trade.

It means being caught in a bawdy-house, living off the profits of another’s prostitution and soliciting sex in public will remain crimes until December 2014, but that legal brothels could be a reality in Canada by next Christmas should Parliament decide to do nothing.

In a landmark, unanimous ruling Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada found bawdy-house laws that make it a crime to be caught unlawfully in what is essentially a brothel are “grossly disproportionate” to the intent of the law, which is to prevent community nuisance.

Tagged with:  #news  #prostitution  #sex trade  #Canada  #brothel
Don’t tell Bob and Doug: ‘Eh’ on the decline as young, urban Canadians adopt new expressions
The one-word expression that has come to partially define a Canadian is dying. Instead “right” has moved in, elbowing “eh” out of the way among young, urban speakers of Canadian English.
“Eh is this quintessential thing that we think of as being so Canadian,” says Sali Tagliamonte, a linguist at the University of Toronto.
“In Toronto, and I would expect other cities like Ottawa and Vancouver … there’s a massive decline in the use of ‘eh.’ My kids don’t use it. They just don’t. They use something else.
“Eh was the one that kind of identified Canadians for the longest time,” said the linguist, who has four children, ages 10 to 23, and a 30-year-old stepson. “But when I talk to my kids [they say], ‘I don’t want to sound like an old man!’

Don’t tell Bob and Doug: ‘Eh’ on the decline as young, urban Canadians adopt new expressions

The one-word expression that has come to partially define a Canadian is dying. Instead “right” has moved in, elbowing “eh” out of the way among young, urban speakers of Canadian English.

“Eh is this quintessential thing that we think of as being so Canadian,” says Sali Tagliamonte, a linguist at the University of Toronto.

“In Toronto, and I would expect other cities like Ottawa and Vancouver … there’s a massive decline in the use of ‘eh.’ My kids don’t use it. They just don’t. They use something else.

“Eh was the one that kind of identified Canadians for the longest time,” said the linguist, who has four children, ages 10 to 23, and a 30-year-old stepson. “But when I talk to my kids [they say], ‘I don’t want to sound like an old man!’

Pamela Anderson, Simpsons co-creator offer Newfoundland workers $1M novelty cheque to quit seal hunt 
Actress Pamela Anderson and a co-creator of The Simpsons received a frosty reception in St. John’s, N.L., on Tuesday as they tried to present a $1-million incentive to help end the East Coast seal hunt.
Members of the Fish, Food and Allied Workers union, representing sealers, shouted questions at Anderson and Sam Simon during a chaotic news conference outside the office of the Canadian Sealers Association.
At one point, comic Mark Critch of This Hour has 22 Minutes showed up, offering Anderson $1-million to stop acting. (Photo: Paul Daly / The Canadian Press)

Pamela Anderson, Simpsons co-creator offer Newfoundland workers $1M novelty cheque to quit seal hunt 

Actress Pamela Anderson and a co-creator of The Simpsons received a frosty reception in St. John’s, N.L., on Tuesday as they tried to present a $1-million incentive to help end the East Coast seal hunt.

Members of the Fish, Food and Allied Workers union, representing sealers, shouted questions at Anderson and Sam Simon during a chaotic news conference outside the office of the Canadian Sealers Association.

At one point, comic Mark Critch of This Hour has 22 Minutes showed up, offering Anderson $1-million to stop acting. (Photo: Paul Daly / The Canadian Press)

Actress turned Nova Scotia politician files cyberbullying complaint after teen tweets her nude scene from The L Word
Only a few months after voting to enact Canada’s first anti-cyberbullying act, actress-turned-Nova Scotia MLA Lenore Zann has employed the new law to launch an investigation against a teenaged constituent she alleges was cyberbullying her on Twitter.
Ms. Zann’s complaint, made earlier this month to the province’s newly opened CyberSCAN investigation unit, concerned 17-year-old high school student Nick Scissons who, on November 29, tweeted a nude image of Ms. Zann pulled from her 2008 performance on the Showtime drama series The L Word.
The scene in question takes place in the public shower of a women’s prison, and depicts a fully nude Ms. Zann intimidating a fellow inmate with a shiv.
“I did what we tell other women and youth to do, which is to call the police, call the CyberSCAN unit, and make a report. It doesn’t matter what age you are, you’re allowed to do it,” she said, adding that once she had explained the episode by phone to a Truro police officer, the officer replied “yes, that’s right, you’re being cyberbullied.” (Photo: Facebook)

Actress turned Nova Scotia politician files cyberbullying complaint after teen tweets her nude scene from The L Word

Only a few months after voting to enact Canada’s first anti-cyberbullying act, actress-turned-Nova Scotia MLA Lenore Zann has employed the new law to launch an investigation against a teenaged constituent she alleges was cyberbullying her on Twitter.

Ms. Zann’s complaint, made earlier this month to the province’s newly opened CyberSCAN investigation unit, concerned 17-year-old high school student Nick Scissons who, on November 29, tweeted a nude image of Ms. Zann pulled from her 2008 performance on the Showtime drama series The L Word.

The scene in question takes place in the public shower of a women’s prison, and depicts a fully nude Ms. Zann intimidating a fellow inmate with a shiv.

“I did what we tell other women and youth to do, which is to call the police, call the CyberSCAN unit, and make a report. It doesn’t matter what age you are, you’re allowed to do it,” she said, adding that once she had explained the episode by phone to a Truro police officer, the officer replied “yes, that’s right, you’re being cyberbullied.” (Photo: Facebook)

Most Canadian arrest ever? Hamilton police praised after polite detention of flailing female suspect caught on video: ‘I apologize for you having to see that’
A video of two Hamilton police officers subduing a woman during an arrest has garnered international attention online, but unlike many videos of police, it’s evoking praise and not ire.
The video, titled “honest cops” and posted on YouTube on Wednesday, shows two police officers subduing a screaming woman. Throughout the arrest, the male officer uses his size to hold her to the ground, placing handcuffs on the woman before ushering her to the back of a police cruiser. The officers were Mark Morelli and Chantal Wilson, the CBC reports.
The man who shot the video can be heard asking why so much force is being used.
Noting the entire incident has been caught on camera, Morelli turns and explains why he used that amount of force and why it was appropriate.
“While it may appear to be very rough to you, I apologize for you having to see that, but I have the lawful ability to arrest her and I am obligated to arrest her,” Morelli said. “I can’t tell you why, and I’m really sorry about that, but she deserves some privacy too, as do the victims of her [alleged] crimes. (Images: YouTube)

Most Canadian arrest ever? Hamilton police praised after polite detention of flailing female suspect caught on video: ‘I apologize for you having to see that’

A video of two Hamilton police officers subduing a woman during an arrest has garnered international attention online, but unlike many videos of police, it’s evoking praise and not ire.

The video, titled “honest cops” and posted on YouTube on Wednesday, shows two police officers subduing a screaming woman. Throughout the arrest, the male officer uses his size to hold her to the ground, placing handcuffs on the woman before ushering her to the back of a police cruiser. The officers were Mark Morelli and Chantal Wilson, the CBC reports.

The man who shot the video can be heard asking why so much force is being used.

Noting the entire incident has been caught on camera, Morelli turns and explains why he used that amount of force and why it was appropriate.

“While it may appear to be very rough to you, I apologize for you having to see that, but I have the lawful ability to arrest her and I am obligated to arrest her,” Morelli said. “I can’t tell you why, and I’m really sorry about that, but she deserves some privacy too, as do the victims of her [alleged] crimes. (Images: YouTube)

Tagged with:  #news  #police  #Canada  #Hamilton
How a ‘tiny’ flight attendant wrestled a gun from a hijacker’s hands and helped 159 passengers escape safely
Nicole Foran loved to travel. The idea of getting on a plane and going somewhere new always seemed like a good idea to her. She is a Nova Scotian, with equal roots in New Brunswick, and her life, as she knew it, in her 20s, was perfectly, wonderfully unremarkable.
April 19, 2009, started out as just a typical night for Ms. Foran, a flight attendant for the previous two years for CanJet, a charter airline that flies to Caribbean hotspots — Mexico, Jamaica and Cuba — out of Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
Flight 918 was on the tarmac at Sangster International Airport, in Montego Bay, Jamaica, taking on passengers for the short hop to Santa Clara, Cuba. She was making her rounds, handing out customs forms. At 10 p.m. a murmur rippled through the plane. A man was on board. He had a gun.
“In that moment you become a whole new person,” the now 31-year-old says from the airlines’ offices in Enfield, just outside of Halifax. “You shut down and your survival instinct kicks in, and my thought was — how do we get all these people off the plane — and how do we survive this? (Photos: Scott Munn for National Post; Reuters Television)

How a ‘tiny’ flight attendant wrestled a gun from a hijacker’s hands and helped 159 passengers escape safely

Nicole Foran loved to travel. The idea of getting on a plane and going somewhere new always seemed like a good idea to her. She is a Nova Scotian, with equal roots in New Brunswick, and her life, as she knew it, in her 20s, was perfectly, wonderfully unremarkable.

April 19, 2009, started out as just a typical night for Ms. Foran, a flight attendant for the previous two years for CanJet, a charter airline that flies to Caribbean hotspots — Mexico, Jamaica and Cuba — out of Halifax Stanfield International Airport.

Flight 918 was on the tarmac at Sangster International Airport, in Montego Bay, Jamaica, taking on passengers for the short hop to Santa Clara, Cuba. She was making her rounds, handing out customs forms. At 10 p.m. a murmur rippled through the plane. A man was on board. He had a gun.

“In that moment you become a whole new person,” the now 31-year-old says from the airlines’ offices in Enfield, just outside of Halifax. “You shut down and your survival instinct kicks in, and my thought was — how do we get all these people off the plane — and how do we survive this? (Photos: Scott Munn for National Post; Reuters Television)