Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

National Post

postarcadenp:

Austin Grossman’s ‘You’ is the first true piece of fiction literature about the game design world
By Chad Sapieha
http://bit.ly/1gI1Xc1
A dearth of game releases over the holidays combined with a days-long lack of electricity (gee thanks, Toronto ice storm) gave me a chance to put aside my controllers and catch up on some reading, and the first book I picked up was Austin Grossman’s You.
Author of the terrific superhero send-up Soon I Will Be Invincible, Grossman’s first calling was game design. He has two decades of experience working on high profile games, from 1994′s classic System Shock through the paradigm-shifting Deus Ex and all the way up to 2012′s critically acclaimed Dishonored.
It’s from this impressive well of experience that he drew to create what I suspect may be the first piece of real literature that deeply plumbs the profession of game design in the way so many memorable works of fiction have explored other creative industries, including music, film, and art.
Grossman chose as his setting the heady game design days of the mid-to-late 1990s, when designers like John Carmack and Warren Spector were viewed as game making gods, polygonal graphics were experiencing huge leaps forward with almost every new release, and the world was starting to view games as something more than just kids entertainment, both in terms of their potential as a medium for artistic expression and as big business.

postarcadenp:

Austin Grossman’s ‘You’ is the first true piece of fiction literature about the game design world

By Chad Sapieha

http://bit.ly/1gI1Xc1

A dearth of game releases over the holidays combined with a days-long lack of electricity (gee thanks, Toronto ice storm) gave me a chance to put aside my controllers and catch up on some reading, and the first book I picked up was Austin Grossman’s You.

Author of the terrific superhero send-up Soon I Will Be Invincible, Grossman’s first calling was game design. He has two decades of experience working on high profile games, from 1994′s classic System Shock through the paradigm-shifting Deus Ex and all the way up to 2012′s critically acclaimed Dishonored.

It’s from this impressive well of experience that he drew to create what I suspect may be the first piece of real literature that deeply plumbs the profession of game design in the way so many memorable works of fiction have explored other creative industries, including music, film, and art.

Grossman chose as his setting the heady game design days of the mid-to-late 1990s, when designers like John Carmack and Warren Spector were viewed as game making gods, polygonal graphics were experiencing huge leaps forward with almost every new release, and the world was starting to view games as something more than just kids entertainment, both in terms of their potential as a medium for artistic expression and as big business.

nparts:

The Giller of Gillers
On Tuesday, at a gala ceremony in Toronto, the Scotiabank Giller Prize will be awarded for the 20th time. There are prizes that offer more money (the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Non-Fiction) and prizes with a more illustrious history (The Governor General’s Literary Awards) but there’s no denying that this prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in honour of his late wife, journalist and editor Doris Giller, is (and has for a while been) the most prestigious literary award in Canada. It is not uncommon, in the minutes after the winner is announced, for the book’s publisher to place a call to the printer and order tens of thousands of additional copies. It is a life-changing award. Before we add one more name to the list  — Dan Vyleta, Craig Davidson, Dennis Bock, Lynn Coady and Lisa Moore are nominated for this year’s prize — books editor Mark Medley asked a cross-section of previous recipients to pick (or attempt to pick) their favourite Giller Prize-winning book from the last two decades: http://natpo.st/17xwitf

nparts:

The Giller of Gillers

On Tuesday, at a gala ceremony in Toronto, the Scotiabank Giller Prize will be awarded for the 20th time. There are prizes that offer more money (the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Non-Fiction) and prizes with a more illustrious history (The Governor General’s Literary Awards) but there’s no denying that this prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in honour of his late wife, journalist and editor Doris Giller, is (and has for a while been) the most prestigious literary award in Canada. It is not uncommon, in the minutes after the winner is announced, for the book’s publisher to place a call to the printer and order tens of thousands of additional copies. It is a life-changing award. Before we add one more name to the list  — Dan Vyleta, Craig Davidson, Dennis Bock, Lynn Coady and Lisa Moore are nominated for this year’s prize — books editor Mark Medley asked a cross-section of previous recipients to pick (or attempt to pick) their favourite Giller Prize-winning book from the last two decades: http://natpo.st/17xwitf

nationalpostphotos:

World of books — A host arranges books at the ‘Knaur’ publishing house stand a day before the launch of the 2013 Frankfurt Book Fair on October 8, 2013 in Frankfurt, Germany. This year’s fair will be open to the public from October 9-13 and the official partner nation is Brazil.  (Photo by Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images)

nationalpostphotos:

World of books — A host arranges books at the ‘Knaur’ publishing house stand a day before the launch of the 2013 Frankfurt Book Fair on October 8, 2013 in Frankfurt, Germany. This year’s fair will be open to the public from October 9-13 and the official partner nation is Brazil.  (Photo by Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #books
nparts:

Alice Munro — ‘a master of the contemporary short story’ — wins the Nobel Prize for literature
Decorated Canadian author Alice Munro says she never thought she would win the Nobel Prize for Literature, but calls being the first Canadian-based writer to secure the honour “quite wonderful.”
The 82-year-old writer was named today as the 110th Nobel laureate in literature and the only the 13th woman to receive the distinction.
“I knew I was in the running, yes, but I never thought I would win,” Munro said by telephone when contacted by The Canadian Press in Victoria.
She added that she was delighted and “just terribly surprised.” (Photo: Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

nparts:

Alice Munro — ‘a master of the contemporary short story’ — wins the Nobel Prize for literature

Decorated Canadian author Alice Munro says she never thought she would win the Nobel Prize for Literature, but calls being the first Canadian-based writer to secure the honour “quite wonderful.”

The 82-year-old writer was named today as the 110th Nobel laureate in literature and the only the 13th woman to receive the distinction.

“I knew I was in the running, yes, but I never thought I would win,” Munro said by telephone when contacted by The Canadian Press in Victoria.

She added that she was delighted and “just terribly surprised.” (Photo: Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

nparts:

Tom Clancy dead at age 66, was best-selling author of numerous military thrillers
Best-selling author Tom Clancy died in a Baltimore hospital at the age of 66 Tuesday night, his publisher confirmed to the New York Times.
Clancy was famous for his jargon-filled military thrillers such as The Hunt for Red October, The Sum of All Fears and Patriot Games. Numerous films and video-games have been based on his work. (Photo: Handout)

nparts:

Tom Clancy dead at age 66, was best-selling author of numerous military thrillers

Best-selling author Tom Clancy died in a Baltimore hospital at the age of 66 Tuesday night, his publisher confirmed to the New York Times.

Clancy was famous for his jargon-filled military thrillers such as The Hunt for Red October, The Sum of All Fears and Patriot Games. Numerous films and video-games have been based on his work. (Photo: Handout)

Tagged with:  #news  #Tom Clancy  #books  #author
nparts:

'I don’t love women writers enough to teach them': Giller-nominated author and University of Toronto teacher on why he only teaches books by men
David Gilmour has never been afraid to speak his mind. In a 2011 interview with the National Post, he admitted wanting to “beat the living s–t” out of a critic who’d given him a bad review and spoke at length about how much he hated socializing with fellow Canadian authors, whom he labelled “insecure.” His words have finally come back to haunt him. On Wednesday, Hazlitt, an online magazine published by Random House of Canada, posted a story by Emily M. Keeler — who, full disclosure, writes reviews for the Post — about the 63-year-old Gilmour, who spent over a decade working for the CBC as a film critic and arts reporter. In the article, about his bookshelves, Gilmour said, among other things, that “I’m not interested in teaching books by women” and “I don’t love women writers enough to teach them, if you want women writers go down the hall. What I teach is guys. Serious heterosexual guys.” Gilmour, whose latest novel, Extraordinary, was recently longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, tried to explain himself to Books Editor Mark Medley. (Photo: Della Rollins for National Post)

nparts:

'I don’t love women writers enough to teach them': Giller-nominated author and University of Toronto teacher on why he only teaches books by men

David Gilmour has never been afraid to speak his mind. In a 2011 interview with the National Post, he admitted wanting to “beat the living s–t” out of a critic who’d given him a bad review and spoke at length about how much he hated socializing with fellow Canadian authors, whom he labelled “insecure.” His words have finally come back to haunt him. On Wednesday, Hazlitt, an online magazine published by Random House of Canada, posted a story by Emily M. Keeler — who, full disclosure, writes reviews for the Post — about the 63-year-old Gilmour, who spent over a decade working for the CBC as a film critic and arts reporter. In the article, about his bookshelves, Gilmour said, among other things, that “I’m not interested in teaching books by women” and “I don’t love women writers enough to teach them, if you want women writers go down the hall. What I teach is guys. Serious heterosexual guys.” Gilmour, whose latest novel, Extraordinary, was recently longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, tried to explain himself to Books Editor Mark Medley. (Photo: Della Rollins for National Post)

nparts:

Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele, everyone!Charlie Hunnam and Dakota Johnson have been cast as the leads in an upcoming Fifty Shades of Grey film adaptation. MORE HERE: natpo.st/17JIlCP

nparts:

Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele, everyone!

Charlie Hunnam and Dakota Johnson have been cast as the leads in an upcoming Fifty Shades of Grey film adaptation. MORE HERE: natpo.st/17JIlCP

nationalpostphotos:

For coffee and book lovers — A woman uses a laptop computer at a cafe inside a bookstore in downtown Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 20, 2013. The bookstore specializes in second hand books written in Portuguese or French published in the19th and 20th centuries. The oldest book is a religious one written in Hebrew and published in 1750. (YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

nationalpostphotos:

For coffee and book lovers — A woman uses a laptop computer at a cafe inside a bookstore in downtown Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 20, 2013. The bookstore specializes in second hand books written in Portuguese or French published in the19th and 20th centuries. The oldest book is a religious one written in Hebrew and published in 1750. (YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #books  #bookstore  #Rio de Janeiro  #Brazil
nparts:

Neil Gaiman: The kid stays in the literature with ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’In her review of Neil Gaiman’s new novel, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, A.S. Byatt describes one of Gaiman’s earlier books as “for adults who remember being child readers.” The same could probably be said of everything he’s ever written; Gaiman taps into childhood as well as any living writer. As a boy, he was obsessed with books, so much so that at family gatherings “they would frisk me to make sure I didn’t have a book on me,” he laughs. But The Ocean at the End of the Lane is not only for adults who remember being children, but, perhaps more importantly, for those who’ve forgotten.The book started as a short story for his wife, the musician Amanda Palmer, but just wouldn’t “behave itself” and eventually ballooned into a novel. It concerns an unnamed narrator who returns to his hometown, in the English countryside, for a funeral. Afterwards he’s compelled to visit the farm where a young neighbour, Lettie Hempstock, once lived with her mother and grandmother. He wanders around the property, winding up at a small duck pond, which Lettie always claimed was an ocean. It is here he begins to remember strange events that occurred four decades ago, when he was a lonely seven-year-old boy, events that began with a suicide. It’s a novel about the reliability of memory, the wonder of childhood, and what we forget, by choice or otherwise, as we grow older. Like a photo seen through an Instagram filter, the novel somehow feels both new and timeless at the same moment. (Peter J. Thompson/National Post)

nparts:

Neil Gaiman: The kid stays in the literature with ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’
In her review of Neil Gaiman’s new novel, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, A.S. Byatt describes one of Gaiman’s earlier books as “for adults who remember being child readers.” The same could probably be said of everything he’s ever written; Gaiman taps into childhood as well as any living writer. As a boy, he was obsessed with books, so much so that at family gatherings “they would frisk me to make sure I didn’t have a book on me,” he laughs. But The Ocean at the End of the Lane is not only for adults who remember being children, but, perhaps more importantly, for those who’ve forgotten.

The book started as a short story for his wife, the musician Amanda Palmer, but just wouldn’t “behave itself” and eventually ballooned into a novel. It concerns an unnamed narrator who returns to his hometown, in the English countryside, for a funeral. Afterwards he’s compelled to visit the farm where a young neighbour, Lettie Hempstock, once lived with her mother and grandmother. He wanders around the property, winding up at a small duck pond, which Lettie always claimed was an ocean. It is here he begins to remember strange events that occurred four decades ago, when he was a lonely seven-year-old boy, events that began with a suicide. It’s a novel about the reliability of memory, the wonder of childhood, and what we forget, by choice or otherwise, as we grow older. Like a photo seen through an Instagram filter, the novel somehow feels both new and timeless at the same moment. (Peter J. Thompson/National Post)

nparts:

Statue of Colin Firth emerging from the water as Mr. Darcy installed in London’s Hyde Park
It’s a 12-foot fibreglass recreation of the moment that made Firth a sex symbol, and you can swim right up to it! More here: natpo.st/1daTZnR

nparts:

Statue of Colin Firth emerging from the water as Mr. Darcy installed in London’s Hyde Park

It’s a 12-foot fibreglass recreation of the moment that made Firth a sex symbol, and you can swim right up to it! More here: natpo.st/1daTZnR

nparts:

Not sure what to read this summer? Books editor Mark Medley joined some of Canada’s top authors to put together the only reading list you’ll need as the temperature rises. Find it here: natpo.st/10Ejwpl

nparts:

Not sure what to read this summer? Books editor Mark Medley joined some of Canada’s top authors to put together the only reading list you’ll need as the temperature rises. Find it here: natpo.st/10Ejwpl

postarcadenp:

Boss Fight Books brings the video game nostalgia in paperback form
By Matthew O’Mara 
Video game books are something of a double edged laser sword.
While gaming books are often fascinating to read and the history of the medium is often rich and colourful, video game literature is often dense in both size and complexity.
Gabe Durham, co-founder of Boss Fight Books, wants to change all that by creating his own series of books that feature in depth examinations of classic video game titles.
“I was reading a book on the history of Nintendo and it was fun, but it was covering so much history,” Mr. Durham said in an interview from Los Angeles.
“There were some parts I just wanted it to slow down and tell me more.”
Inspired by the 33⅓ series of books that tell the history of classic music albums — for example Radiohead’s Ok Computer – in splendid detail, with each tome designed to focus on specific themes and analysis.
The same will hold true for Boss Fight Books, Mr. Durham said.
“I got on Google and searched for thirty three and a third of video games and I fully expected there to be something because it just made so much sense,” Mr. Durham said.
http://bit.ly/13O8Xhl

postarcadenp:

Boss Fight Books brings the video game nostalgia in paperback form

By Matthew O’Mara 

Video game books are something of a double edged laser sword.

While gaming books are often fascinating to read and the history of the medium is often rich and colourful, video game literature is often dense in both size and complexity.

Gabe Durham, co-founder of Boss Fight Books, wants to change all that by creating his own series of books that feature in depth examinations of classic video game titles.

“I was reading a book on the history of Nintendo and it was fun, but it was covering so much history,” Mr. Durham said in an interview from Los Angeles.

“There were some parts I just wanted it to slow down and tell me more.”

Inspired by the 33⅓ series of books that tell the history of classic music albums — for example Radiohead’s Ok Computer – in splendid detail, with each tome designed to focus on specific themes and analysis.

The same will hold true for Boss Fight Books, Mr. Durham said.

“I got on Google and searched for thirty three and a third of video games and I fully expected there to be something because it just made so much sense,” Mr. Durham said.

http://bit.ly/13O8Xhl

Children’s media use cuddly animals to reinforce ‘racist’ and ‘socially dominant norms,’ researcher says
Parents who read their kids stories about happy, human-like animals like Franklin the Turtle or Arthur at bedtime are exposing their kids to racism, materialism, homophobia and patriarchal norms, according to a paper presented at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Most animals portrayed in children’s books, songs and on clothing send a bad message, according to academics Nora Timmerman and  Julia Ostertag: That animals only exist for human use, that humans are better than animals, that animals don’t have their own stories to tell, that it’s fine to “demean” them by cooing over their cuteness. Perhaps worst of all, they say, animals are anthropomorphized to reinforce “socially dominant norms” like nuclear families and gender stereotypes.

nparts:

Pint-sized historyShakespeare’s Pub sorts through tall tales and famous names to soak up English culture’s single most defining institution natpo.st/1a23jJc

nparts:

Pint-sized history

Shakespeare’s Pub sorts through tall tales and famous names to soak up English culture’s single most defining institution natpo.st/1a23jJc