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Priest learns $700 painting actually a masterpiece worth $700,000 after bringing it to the Antiques Roadshow
A painting that hung on the wall of a priest’s home for more than a decade after he bought it for £400 ($700) at an antiques shop has been identified as a van Dyck portrait worth a thousand times as much.
The work, which had previously been dismissed as a copy, was valued £400,000 ($700,000) after its owner brought it into the Antiques Roadshow and is the most valuable panting to be identified in the 36-year history of the program.
Canon Jamie MacLeod, who took the painting along to a roadshow in Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, now plans to sell it to buy new church bells. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Priest learns $700 painting actually a masterpiece worth $700,000 after bringing it to the Antiques Roadshow

A painting that hung on the wall of a priest’s home for more than a decade after he bought it for £400 ($700) at an antiques shop has been identified as a van Dyck portrait worth a thousand times as much.

The work, which had previously been dismissed as a copy, was valued £400,000 ($700,000) after its owner brought it into the Antiques Roadshow and is the most valuable panting to be identified in the 36-year history of the program.

Canon Jamie MacLeod, who took the painting along to a roadshow in Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, now plans to sell it to buy new church bells. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Today’s National Post front page, illustrated by Kagan McLeod. Full Nelson Mandela coverage.

Today’s National Post front page, illustrated by Kagan McLeod. Full Nelson Mandela coverage.

Artist behind controversial ‘nude’ Stephen Harper portrait defends her work after Ottawa exhibit shows 14 different artistic portrayals of PM

A Kingston artist has defended her controversial 2011 portrait of Stephen Harper, which imagines the prime minister reclining nude with a backdrop of suited attendants offering him Tim Hortons’ coffee.

Margaret Sutherland’s painting was the most well-known image at a “portrait gallery” of depictions of Harper put together by artist Don Monet and exhibited at an Ottawa Gallery last week. 

In a comment on an Ottawa Citizen preview of the exhibit, Sutherland defended her work against charges of “overexposure” and said its reference to the classic tale of a naked leader — the Emperor’s New Clothes — has continuing relevance, in light of the ongoing Senate scandal.

The ‘eccentric fellow’ who lived an isolated, Gollum-like existence alone with a $1.4-billion Nazi art trove
As an expert in works of art that the Nazis called “degenerate” and in the dealers who traded them during World War II, Vanessa Voigt often wondered what had become of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of a prominent Nazi-era art dealer and a figure she had come to view as a phantom.
Early last year, Voigt finally came face to face with the elusive man who kept popping up vaguely in her research. German customs officers had just stumbled on some 1,280 paintings and drawings — masterworks believed to be worth more than US$1-billion — stashed in Gurlitt’s Munich apartment, and they turned to Voigt to help them understand what was going on.
As the customs officers confiscated the works, a distressed Gurlitt paced restlessly around his previously inviolable domain, muttering over and over to himself, “Now they are taking everything from me,” recalled Voigt, who was present. “He was mortified,” she said.
In an interview, his first, published Sunday, Gurlitt, 80, told the German magazine Der Spiegel that the confiscation of the artwork was a devastating blow — more difficult even than the loss of his sister, Benita, to cancer last year. “Saying goodbye to my pictures was the most painful of all,” he said. (Lost Art Koordinierungsstelle Magdeburg)

The ‘eccentric fellow’ who lived an isolated, Gollum-like existence alone with a $1.4-billion Nazi art trove

As an expert in works of art that the Nazis called “degenerate” and in the dealers who traded them during World War II, Vanessa Voigt often wondered what had become of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of a prominent Nazi-era art dealer and a figure she had come to view as a phantom.

Early last year, Voigt finally came face to face with the elusive man who kept popping up vaguely in her research. German customs officers had just stumbled on some 1,280 paintings and drawings — masterworks believed to be worth more than US$1-billion — stashed in Gurlitt’s Munich apartment, and they turned to Voigt to help them understand what was going on.

As the customs officers confiscated the works, a distressed Gurlitt paced restlessly around his previously inviolable domain, muttering over and over to himself, “Now they are taking everything from me,” recalled Voigt, who was present. “He was mortified,” she said.

In an interview, his first, published Sunday, Gurlitt, 80, told the German magazine Der Spiegel that the confiscation of the artwork was a devastating blow — more difficult even than the loss of his sister, Benita, to cancer last year. “Saying goodbye to my pictures was the most painful of all,” he said. (Lost Art Koordinierungsstelle Magdeburg)

Tagged with:  #news  #art

nparts:

Francis Bacon painting of Lucian Freud sells for record $142-million

A Tuesday art sale by Christie’s has set an all-time record, netting $691-million in sales — including the Bacon painting, plus works by Andy Warhol, Mark Rothko and Jeff Koons: natpo.st/18rN9bz

Russian artist nails his genitals to Moscow’s Red Square in front of tourists to protest ‘police state’
A Russian performance artist nailed his genitals to the ground outside Moscow’s Red Square in protest over Russia’s “police state” as the country marked national police day.
A video shows naked Pyotr Pavlensky sitting on Russia’s most famous square just outside the Kremlin on Sunday afternoon after nailing himself to the ground. Police first took him to the hospital and then into custody.
Interfax news agency said that a court dismissed charges of “petty hooliganism” and released him Monday. (Screengrab via Grani.ru)

Russian artist nails his genitals to Moscow’s Red Square in front of tourists to protest ‘police state’

A Russian performance artist nailed his genitals to the ground outside Moscow’s Red Square in protest over Russia’s “police state” as the country marked national police day.

A video shows naked Pyotr Pavlensky sitting on Russia’s most famous square just outside the Kremlin on Sunday afternoon after nailing himself to the ground. Police first took him to the hospital and then into custody.

Interfax news agency said that a court dismissed charges of “petty hooliganism” and released him Monday. (Screengrab via Grani.ru)

nationalpostphotos:

Never too old for basketball — Ivory tusk carvings of skeletons playing basketball made from extinct woolly mammoths are seen on display at a two day exhibition in Hong Kong entitled ‘Artistic Era of Harmony and Prosperity, Prestige Crafts Hong Kong Mammoth Tusk Carving Exhibition’, Hong Kong, China, 07 November 2013.  EPA/ALEX HOFFORD

nationalpostphotos:

Never too old for basketball — Ivory tusk carvings of skeletons playing basketball made from extinct woolly mammoths are seen on display at a two day exhibition in Hong Kong entitled ‘Artistic Era of Harmony and Prosperity, Prestige Crafts Hong Kong Mammoth Tusk Carving Exhibition’, Hong Kong, China, 07 November 2013.  EPA/ALEX HOFFORD

Tagged with:  #art  #sports  #basketball  #ivory  #skeletons
Vast, ‘$1.4-billion’ stash of art thought destroyed in Nazi Germany found in Munich apartment
A random background check designed to expose money-launderers travelling to Switzerland has uncovered a treasure trove of modern art thought to have been destroyed in Nazi Germany.
Customs officials seized the haul of 1,500 works — including masterpieces by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Marc Chagall — from the Munich apartment of an elderly man suspected of hiding his wealth in Swiss banks.
The paintings were found stacked in the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, 80, whose father, a prominent Munich art dealer, is believed to have acquired them during the 1930s and 1940s.
"From floor to ceiling, from bedroom to bathroom, were piles and piles of old food in tins and old noodles. Behind it all were these pictures worth tens, hundreds of millions of euros.” (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Vast, ‘$1.4-billion’ stash of art thought destroyed in Nazi Germany found in Munich apartment

A random background check designed to expose money-launderers travelling to Switzerland has uncovered a treasure trove of modern art thought to have been destroyed in Nazi Germany.

Customs officials seized the haul of 1,500 works — including masterpieces by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Marc Chagall — from the Munich apartment of an elderly man suspected of hiding his wealth in Swiss banks.

The paintings were found stacked in the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, 80, whose father, a prominent Munich art dealer, is believed to have acquired them during the 1930s and 1940s.

"From floor to ceiling, from bedroom to bathroom, were piles and piles of old food in tins and old noodles. Behind it all were these pictures worth tens, hundreds of millions of euros.” (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #news  #art  #Nazis  #Matisse  #Picasso  #Renoir  #Chagall  #Nazi art
nparts:

Just add Nazis: Banksy buys $50 thrift store painting, draws a man on it — now it’s selling for $200K
Graffiti artist Banksy’s New York City residency is nearly finished, but the artist is showing no sign of slowing down, having raised eyebrows after adding a Nazi to a painting he bought at a thrift shop – which is now selling for more than $200,000 at a charity auction. (Photo: Housing Works)

nparts:

Just add Nazis: Banksy buys $50 thrift store painting, draws a man on it — now it’s selling for $200K

Graffiti artist Banksy’s New York City residency is nearly finished, but the artist is showing no sign of slowing down, having raised eyebrows after adding a Nazi to a painting he bought at a thrift shop – which is now selling for more than $200,000 at a charity auction. (Photo: Housing Works)

Tagged with:  #news  #art  #Banksy

nparts:

Is Sylvester Stallone a better painter than actor?

Judge for yourself! The Rocky star has just unveiled an exhibit of his work in Russia, and … it’s not bad: natpo.st/1dJ22NF

How We Die Now: “Death renders all equal,” wrote Claudian. How each one of us relates to death, however, is individual, and always changing — as we mature; as we contemplate life, and death, around us; and as society changes. In this special series in the National Post, we present stories and columns looking at the different ways we see, and prepare for, the Great Equalizer. (Illustrations: Kagan McLeod)

How We Die Now: “Death renders all equal,” wrote Claudian. How each one of us relates to death, however, is individual, and always changing — as we mature; as we contemplate life, and death, around us; and as society changes. In this special series in the National Post, we present stories and columns looking at the different ways we see, and prepare for, the Great Equalizer. (Illustrations: Kagan McLeod)

Tagged with:  #news  #death  #Illustration  #art  #Kagan McLeod
Czech artist lets socialist president know how he feels with giant middle finger in Prague
“The finger,” said Czech sculptor David Cerny, “speaks for itself.” On that point, at least, everyone could agree.
Cerny is not known for understatement or diplomacy, from depicting Germany as a network of motorways resembling a swastika to displaying a caricature of a former Czech president inside an enormous fiberglass rear end.
But on Monday, Cerny, 45, took his political satire to new heights – or depths, depending on your perspective – when, on the eve of Czech general elections this weekend, he installed on the Vltava River a 30-foot-high, plastic, purple hand with a raised middle finger. It is a symbol, he said, that points directly at the Prague Castle, the seat of the current Czech president, Milos Zeman.
Cerny said the monumental hand with its 16-foot-long outstretched middle finger, placed on a float facing the castle, was a “scream of alarm” against the state of politics in the Czech Republic, endemic corruption and Zeman, a former leftist prime minister, whom he accused of becoming intoxicated with power. (Photo: AFP PHOTO /MICHAL CIZEKMICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)

Czech artist lets socialist president know how he feels with giant middle finger in Prague

“The finger,” said Czech sculptor David Cerny, “speaks for itself.” On that point, at least, everyone could agree.

Cerny is not known for understatement or diplomacy, from depicting Germany as a network of motorways resembling a swastika to displaying a caricature of a former Czech president inside an enormous fiberglass rear end.

But on Monday, Cerny, 45, took his political satire to new heights – or depths, depending on your perspective – when, on the eve of Czech general elections this weekend, he installed on the Vltava River a 30-foot-high, plastic, purple hand with a raised middle finger. It is a symbol, he said, that points directly at the Prague Castle, the seat of the current Czech president, Milos Zeman.

Cerny said the monumental hand with its 16-foot-long outstretched middle finger, placed on a float facing the castle, was a “scream of alarm” against the state of politics in the Czech Republic, endemic corruption and Zeman, a former leftist prime minister, whom he accused of becoming intoxicated with power. (Photo: AFP PHOTO /MICHAL CIZEKMICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)

nationalpostphotos:

Festival of Lights — The installation “Waechter der Zeit” (Guardians of the time) stand in front of the Berlin cathedral during the festival of lights Wednesday evening, Oct. 9, 2013. The festival of lights illuminates numerous buildings in Berlin through Oct. 20. (AP Photo/dpa, Britta Pedersen)

nationalpostphotos:

Festival of Lights — The installation “Waechter der Zeit” (Guardians of the time) stand in front of the Berlin cathedral during the festival of lights Wednesday evening, Oct. 9, 2013. The festival of lights illuminates numerous buildings in Berlin through Oct. 20. (AP Photo/dpa, Britta Pedersen)

Tagged with:  #art  #festival of lights  #Berlin
Mythical lost Leonardo da Vinci painting may have been found in Swiss bank vault
IT WAS lost for so long that it had assumed mythical status for art historians. Some doubted whether it even existed.
But a 500-year-old mystery was apparently solved Friday after a painting attributed to Leonardo da Vinci was discovered in a Swiss bank vault.
The painting, which depicts Isabella d’Este, a Renaissance noblewoman, was found in a private collection of 400 works kept in a Swiss bank by an Italian family who asked not to be identified. (Handout)

Mythical lost Leonardo da Vinci painting may have been found in Swiss bank vault

IT WAS lost for so long that it had assumed mythical status for art historians. Some doubted whether it even existed.

But a 500-year-old mystery was apparently solved Friday after a painting attributed to Leonardo da Vinci was discovered in a Swiss bank vault.

The painting, which depicts Isabella d’Este, a Renaissance noblewoman, was found in a private collection of 400 works kept in a Swiss bank by an Italian family who asked not to be identified. (Handout)

nationalpostphotos:

White Night in Toronto — Nuit Blanche is Toronto’s annual all-night celebration of contemporary art. This year’s Nuit Blanche took place Saturday, October 5 from 6:51 p.m. until sunrise. The lineup included 112 art projects and installations created by more than 500 local, national and international artists who transformed the streets of Toronto for a single night. (Photos by Tyler Anderson/National Post)