Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

National Post

The only two buildings in Toronto worth saving are Old City Hall and Osgoode Hall, Frank Gehry says

Architect Frank Gehry says there are only two buildings in his hometown worth saving: Old City Hall and Osgoode Hall.

Everything else is fair game to be torn down, Mr. Gehry suggested to Toronto and East York Community Council on Tuesday morning.

Mr. Gehry and David Mirvish, the theatre impresario, sought permission on Tuesday from community council to build three condo towers, 82, 84 and 86 storeys tall, on the site of the Princess of Wales theatre and other buildings to its east on King Street West. (Photo: Courtesy of Gehry International, Inc.)

New One World Trade Centre so bland it ‘looks like something they made in Canada’: British street artist Banksy
In conveying the apparent blandness of One World Trade Center, the 541-metre skyscraper built to replace New York City’s destroyed Twin Towers, British street artist Banksy on Sunday equated the structure to something from Canada.
“That building is a disaster. Well no, disasters are interesting. One World Trade Center is a non-event. It’s vanilla. It looks like something they would build in Canada.” (Photo: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

New One World Trade Centre so bland it ‘looks like something they made in Canada’: British street artist Banksy

In conveying the apparent blandness of One World Trade Center, the 541-metre skyscraper built to replace New York City’s destroyed Twin Towers, British street artist Banksy on Sunday equated the structure to something from Canada.

“That building is a disaster. Well no, disasters are interesting. One World Trade Center is a non-event. It’s vanilla. It looks like something they would build in Canada.” (Photo: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

‘Stonehenge of Idiots’: Critics say U of T Mississauga campus has hit rock bottom with $1M stone entrance sign
Piles of rock, no matter how artfully arranged, tend to get a rough ride in the court of public opinion, especially when they cost big bucks and are paid for out of the public purse.
The University of Toronto’s Mississauga (UTM) campus administration say a $1-million rock slab installation at the main entrance is intended to give the university a stronger “presence” in its location on Mississauga Rd. north of Dundas St. W.
But since its completion last spring, students have variously dubbed the new entrance as the “Stonehenge of Idiots,” and “The Rock Bottom,” complaining it’s a waste of money at a time when they are struggling to pay rising tuition and ancillary fees and university resources are already stretched thin.
“It’s a $1-million pile of rocks,” said fifth-year student Becky Arnott Friday. “I don’t think you can say it was a good way to spend that money. It’s unnecessary.” (Tyler Anderson/National Post)

‘Stonehenge of Idiots’: Critics say U of T Mississauga campus has hit rock bottom with $1M stone entrance sign

Piles of rock, no matter how artfully arranged, tend to get a rough ride in the court of public opinion, especially when they cost big bucks and are paid for out of the public purse.

The University of Toronto’s Mississauga (UTM) campus administration say a $1-million rock slab installation at the main entrance is intended to give the university a stronger “presence” in its location on Mississauga Rd. north of Dundas St. W.

But since its completion last spring, students have variously dubbed the new entrance as the “Stonehenge of Idiots,” and “The Rock Bottom,” complaining it’s a waste of money at a time when they are struggling to pay rising tuition and ancillary fees and university resources are already stretched thin.

“It’s a $1-million pile of rocks,” said fifth-year student Becky Arnott Friday. “I don’t think you can say it was a good way to spend that money. It’s unnecessary.” (Tyler Anderson/National Post)

nationalpostphotos:

Fixing the Coliseum — A general view of the Coliseum covered by scaffolding awaiting the start of the restoration work on October 9, 2013 in Rome, Italy.  Diego Della Valle, owner of Tod’s, has offered to fund the restoration of the Coliseum with 25 million euros in return for some brand advertising.  (Photo by Giorgio Cosulich/Getty Images)

nationalpostphotos:

Fixing the Coliseum — A general view of the Coliseum covered by scaffolding awaiting the start of the restoration work on October 9, 2013 in Rome, Italy.  Diego Della Valle, owner of Tod’s, has offered to fund the restoration of the Coliseum with 25 million euros in return for some brand advertising.  (Photo by Giorgio Cosulich/Getty Images)

Tagged with:  #Rome  #Coliseum  #architecture

nationalpostphotos:

Inflatable Concert Hall — The world’s first inflatable concert hall in the disaster-hit northeastern coast town of Matsushima in Miyagi prefecture, Japan. British sculptor Anish Kapoor and Japanese architect Arata Isozaki created the unusual Ark Nova, a balloon made of a coated polyester material, which has been erected at a park in Matsushima for the concert hall. The first event will run from September 27 through October 14, including performances by the Sendai Philharmonic Orchestra and traditional Japanese kabuki theatre. (Photos by LUCERNE FESTIVAL ARKNOVA 2013/AFP/Getty Images)

Tower Infinity in South Korea to be the world’s first invisible skyscraper

There’s no construction date yet for the planned 1,476-foot tower, called Tower Infinity. But its architects have just been granted a construction permit to begin building outside of Seoul, South Korea near Incheon International Airport.

The visionaries behind the project, GDS Architects, will make the tower appear “invisible” using an LED facade system with optical cameras to display what’s directly behind the building. When turned on, the “reflective skin” of the building will give the illusion that Tower Infinity is blending in with the skyline. (Photos: GDS Architects)

London skyscraper’s ‘deathray’ reflection is melting cars, burning businesses, but also cooking eggs
London’s skyline has a new addition this week: the Walkie Scorchie. Joining the crowded group of glass protrusions, such as the Shard, the Gherkin, and the Cheesegrater, is 20 Fenchurch Street, which had previously been known as the Walkie Talkie, on account of it looking vaguely like a gigantic two-way radio.
But the 37-storey office block, due to be completed next year, has gained a new sinister reputation: the death ray, the fryscraper, the Walkie Scorchie.
Its south-facing concave facade conspires to concentrate and reflect the sun’s rays into an intense beam of shimmery light, hitting the buildings on the opposite side of the road. Along a 30-yard stretch of pavement at Eastcheap – just a Molotov cocktail’s throw from where the Great Fire of 1666 started -London’s burning.
Yesterday afternoon, I was sent out to see if I could fry an egg in the heat, a task that I presumed was impossible on an overcast September day. But, not only was it possible, I had to run out of the death ray that was slowly cooking my egg, because the thinning hairs on my head started to catch fire. The distinctive smell of burning follicles, combined with the sensation of a magnifying glass being shone on my pate, forced me to take cover along the road. (Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

London skyscraper’s ‘deathray’ reflection is melting cars, burning businesses, but also cooking eggs

London’s skyline has a new addition this week: the Walkie Scorchie. Joining the crowded group of glass protrusions, such as the Shard, the Gherkin, and the Cheesegrater, is 20 Fenchurch Street, which had previously been known as the Walkie Talkie, on account of it looking vaguely like a gigantic two-way radio.

But the 37-storey office block, due to be completed next year, has gained a new sinister reputation: the death ray, the fryscraper, the Walkie Scorchie.

Its south-facing concave facade conspires to concentrate and reflect the sun’s rays into an intense beam of shimmery light, hitting the buildings on the opposite side of the road. Along a 30-yard stretch of pavement at Eastcheap – just a Molotov cocktail’s throw from where the Great Fire of 1666 started -London’s burning.

Yesterday afternoon, I was sent out to see if I could fry an egg in the heat, a task that I presumed was impossible on an overcast September day. But, not only was it possible, I had to run out of the death ray that was slowly cooking my egg, because the thinning hairs on my head started to catch fire. The distinctive smell of burning follicles, combined with the sensation of a magnifying glass being shone on my pate, forced me to take cover along the road. (Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Massive, faux mountain retreat atop Chinese high-rise demolished after years of complaints about ‘outrageous illegal structure’
Workers have started demolishing a luxury villa built atop a high-rise apartment block in China’s capital, a private mountain peak that earned the unofficial title of “most outrageous illegal structure.”

Built over six years by a Chinese medicine mogul, the complex of rooms, rocks, trees and bushes looming over the 26-story building looked like something built into a seaside cliff. It became the latest symbol of disregard for the law among the rich as well as the rampant practice of building illegal additions.

On Thursday, workers were cordoning off the area around the building, Xinhua reported, and officials were on hand to make sure the building stayed structurally sound during the removal of the unauthorized 8,600-square foot mansion. (Photos: Wang Zhao / AFP / Getty; Xinhua, Luo Xiaoguang / AP Photo)

China opens ‘world’s largest building’ — complete with indoor beach, fake sun
China’s fourth largest city may have problems with smog, but you’d never know it sitting at the urban centre’s beachside resort. Of course, Chengdu, doesn’t have a beach, and the resort is indoors.

The city has just opened the New Century Global Centre, a structure that China touts as the “World’s Largest Building.” The giant structure has 1.76 million square metres of floor space and is half a kilometre long, 400 metres wide and more than 100 metres tall.

Contained inside is a 14-screen IMAX theatre, two five-star hotels, a shopping village and a long stretch of offices. The developers claim that you could fit more than 20 Sydney Opera Houses inside the Global Centre. (Photos: AFP/Getty Images)

npostlife:

Happy birthday, Frank Lloyd Wright. You would have been 146 last weekThe Darwin D. Martin house (1903-05) in Buffalo is a great example of Wright’s Prairie house style. Our Homes editor Shari Kulha takes a closer look at the great architect’s legacy after visiting some of the most important houses in his oeuvre.[Photo credit: James Walker]

npostlife:

Happy birthday, Frank Lloyd Wright. You would have been 146 last weekThe Darwin D. Martin house (1903-05) in Buffalo is a great example of Wright’s Prairie house style. Our Homes editor Shari Kulha takes a closer look at the great architect’s legacy after visiting some of the most important houses in his oeuvre.
[Photo credit: James Walker]

npostlife:

Ever wonder what it would be like to live in a shipping container?Well, with a bit of the design savvy of Victoria’s Keith Dewey on your side, it could very well be as cozy as this: presenting the Zigloo Domestique. (Click through for a full gallery of the home, created from eight industrial shipping containers.)[Nik West/Canadian Press]

npostlife:

Ever wonder what it would be like to live in a shipping container?
Well, with a bit of the design savvy of Victoria’s Keith Dewey on your side, it could very well be as cozy as this: presenting the Zigloo Domestique. (Click through for a full gallery of the home, created from eight industrial shipping containers.)
[Nik West/Canadian Press]

NYC’s One World Trade Center gets its shiny, silver topping: spire installation completes symbolic height of 1,776 feetThe silver spire topping One World Trade Center has been fully installed on the building’s roof, bringing the iconic structure to its full, symbolic height of 1,776 feet.The spire’s installation was completed Friday morning, after pieces of it had been transported to the roof of the building last week. Construction workers below applauded the milestone.The 1,776 feet is symbolic of the year 1776, when the U.S. declared its independence. (Julio Cortez / AP Photo)

NYC’s One World Trade Center gets its shiny, silver topping: spire installation completes symbolic height of 1,776 feet

The silver spire topping One World Trade Center has been fully installed on the building’s roof, bringing the iconic structure to its full, symbolic height of 1,776 feet.

The spire’s installation was completed Friday morning, after pieces of it had been transported to the roof of the building last week. Construction workers below applauded the milestone.

The 1,776 feet is symbolic of the year 1776, when the U.S. declared its independence. (Julio Cortez / AP Photo)

nparts:

The Month Ahead: March
Spring has not yet sprung, but by the end of March, it will have! Here’s our list of cultural entertainments to keep you busy while you weather the slush and wait for the showers: http://natpo.st/15TKB7o

nparts:

The Month Ahead: March

Spring has not yet sprung, but by the end of March, it will have! Here’s our list of cultural entertainments to keep you busy while you weather the slush and wait for the showers: http://natpo.st/15TKB7o