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Charter Value Added: On Thursday, the Quebec government tabled the “values charter” in an effort to get people to publicly tone down their religious bling and the personal values that guide their lives, etc. Steve Murray imagines what other provinces would mandate as values give the chance.

Charter Value Added: On Thursday, the Quebec government tabled the “values charter” in an effort to get people to publicly tone down their religious bling and the personal values that guide their lives, etc. Steve Murray imagines what other provinces would mandate as values give the chance.

Oil patch workers stumble upon massive new ‘complete find’ dinosaur fossil in Spirit River, Alberta
Experts are calling a dinosaur fossil unearthed in northern Alberta this week one of the “most complete finds in this part of the world in a long time.”
Brian Brake, executive director of the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, said the fossilized remains of a hadrosaur were discovered at an energy company’s work site near Spirit River.

Officials from the pipeline firm contacted the museum, which sent paleontologists to assess the find. “What we have is a totally composed tail,” Brake said. “It’s beautiful.” (Image Courtesy Tourmaline Oil Corp)

Oil patch workers stumble upon massive new ‘complete find’ dinosaur fossil in Spirit River, Alberta

Experts are calling a dinosaur fossil unearthed in northern Alberta this week one of the “most complete finds in this part of the world in a long time.”

Brian Brake, executive director of the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, said the fossilized remains of a hadrosaur were discovered at an energy company’s work site near Spirit River.

Officials from the pipeline firm contacted the museum, which sent paleontologists to assess the find. “What we have is a totally composed tail,” Brake said. “It’s beautiful.” (Image Courtesy Tourmaline Oil Corp)

Fireball streaking across the night sky captured on video by RCMP cruiser’s dash cam
An RCMP cruiser camera captured a falling fireball lighting up the sky during his patrol of a highway in northern Alberta.
Mounties in Manning, six hours north of Edmonton, say the officer was driving on Highway 35 on Saturday night when the meteor appeared shortly after 9:30.
“It started getting brighter and brighter, and all of a sudden, a huge meteor came streaking across the sky,” Const. Josh Stachow told the Edmonton Journal.
“For a moment there, I had no idea what was happening.”

Fireball streaking across the night sky captured on video by RCMP cruiser’s dash cam

An RCMP cruiser camera captured a falling fireball lighting up the sky during his patrol of a highway in northern Alberta.

Mounties in Manning, six hours north of Edmonton, say the officer was driving on Highway 35 on Saturday night when the meteor appeared shortly after 9:30.

“It started getting brighter and brighter, and all of a sudden, a huge meteor came streaking across the sky,” Const. Josh Stachow told the Edmonton Journal.

“For a moment there, I had no idea what was happening.”

Tagged with:  #news  #meteor  #fireball  #Alberta  #space
Mennonites linked to Mexican cartels established cocaine smuggling pipeline near Alberta border: police
Under the guise of a religious movement that abstains from the sins of the modern world, Mexican Mennonites with connections to some of the world’s most vicious cartels have established a drug smuggling pipeline near the Alberta border.
Earlier this month, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) indicted seven people and seized 11,000 pounds of marijuana destined for the midwest states. It also confiscated 30 kilograms of cocaine that was bound for several small towns in Alberta. Investigators say the drugs were ultimately destined for Calgary, where dealers can turn a higher profit than in the United States.
“It’s very popular amongst Mexican cartel members to attempt to move cocaine into Canada because it commands a premium price,” said Jim Schrant, an agent with the DEA. “In one of our investigations, [the dealer] said it was the land of milk and honey for them because they could double their money shipping it and selling it in Canada.” (Photo: File)

Mennonites linked to Mexican cartels established cocaine smuggling pipeline near Alberta border: police

Under the guise of a religious movement that abstains from the sins of the modern world, Mexican Mennonites with connections to some of the world’s most vicious cartels have established a drug smuggling pipeline near the Alberta border.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) indicted seven people and seized 11,000 pounds of marijuana destined for the midwest states. It also confiscated 30 kilograms of cocaine that was bound for several small towns in Alberta. Investigators say the drugs were ultimately destined for Calgary, where dealers can turn a higher profit than in the United States.

“It’s very popular amongst Mexican cartel members to attempt to move cocaine into Canada because it commands a premium price,” said Jim Schrant, an agent with the DEA. “In one of our investigations, [the dealer] said it was the land of milk and honey for them because they could double their money shipping it and selling it in Canada.” (Photo: File)

‘Freeman-on-the-land’ ordered evicted after taking over senior’s property, declaring sovereign ‘embassy’
The man who an Alberta senior says claimed her rental property as a sovereign “embassy” has been ordered by a Calgary judge to vacate the home by 12:01 a.m. Saturday.
Andreas Pirelli, 48 and Rebekah Caverhill have been locked in a two-year battle; Caverhill says he identified himself as a follower of the Freemen-on-the-Land movement, changed the locks on the house and has refused to leave.
Caverhill says she has been billed for renovations the man did inside the home and that he had a lien placed on the property. (Photo: Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press)

‘Freeman-on-the-land’ ordered evicted after taking over senior’s property, declaring sovereign ‘embassy’

The man who an Alberta senior says claimed her rental property as a sovereign “embassy” has been ordered by a Calgary judge to vacate the home by 12:01 a.m. Saturday.

Andreas Pirelli, 48 and Rebekah Caverhill have been locked in a two-year battle; Caverhill says he identified himself as a follower of the Freemen-on-the-Land movement, changed the locks on the house and has refused to leave.

Caverhill says she has been billed for renovations the man did inside the home and that he had a lien placed on the property. (Photo: Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press)

Drunken man who belted out ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ in back of RCMP car running for mayor in Alberta town
An Alberta man who became a YouTube sensation for enthusiastically singing the song, “Bohemian Rhapsody” from the back seat of a police car is going into politics.
Robert Wilkinson is running for mayor of Edson, a town west of Edmonton.
The town says Wilkinson submitted the necessary five signatures from residents along with his nomination papers to register as a candidate.
Wilkinson was convicted of impaired driving last November, fined $1,400 and prohibited from driving for one year.
Video footage captured on the cruiser’s internal camera of Wilkinson’s passionate performance of the Queen rock anthem was later sent to the 29-year-old as evidence for his trial. (YouTube)

Drunken man who belted out ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ in back of RCMP car running for mayor in Alberta town

An Alberta man who became a YouTube sensation for enthusiastically singing the song, “Bohemian Rhapsody” from the back seat of a police car is going into politics.

Robert Wilkinson is running for mayor of Edson, a town west of Edmonton.

The town says Wilkinson submitted the necessary five signatures from residents along with his nomination papers to register as a candidate.

Wilkinson was convicted of impaired driving last November, fined $1,400 and prohibited from driving for one year.

Video footage captured on the cruiser’s internal camera of Wilkinson’s passionate performance of the Queen rock anthem was later sent to the 29-year-old as evidence for his trial. (YouTube)

“I said: ‘This is my house, not yours.’ - Alberta senior fights to reclaim her rental unit from Freeman who declared it an embassy
An Alberta pensioner says she feels like a prisoner after her rental property was claimed as an “embassy” by a man she says identified himself as a Freemen-on-the-Land, a growing movement of so-called sovereign citizens that is raising concerns with authorities both north and south of the border.
“I am an army of one,” says Rebekah Caverhill at her home in Sylvan Lake, near Red Deer. Tears stream down her face. “I’ve been beat up so badly by people that should be helping that I don’t know where to turn.”
Caverhill rented half a duplex she owns in Calgary’s upscale Parkdale neighbourhood to a new tenant in November 2011 on the recommendation of a friend.
The renter, Andreas Pirelli, had recently moved to Calgary from Montreal and was a self-described handyman. She says he agreed to “spruce up” the property in return for three months of free rent. What she thought was a good deal soon turned into a nightmare.
A few months after Pirelli moved in, Caverhill went to inspect the work and she says she found the entire kitchen and bathroom had been gutted. All the doors inside had been removed and the floor of the master bedroom had been painted black, she says 
But Caverhill quickly learned she had much bigger problems.
“He walks me to the door and he’s yelling at me, ’I’m a Freemen-on-the-Land,”’ Caverhill says.
“I said: ’This is my house, not yours.’ He said: ’No. This is an embassy house now and it’s mine and you have no rights’, so then he slams the door.” (Photo: Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press)

“I said: ‘This is my house, not yours.’ - Alberta senior fights to reclaim her rental unit from Freeman who declared it an embassy

An Alberta pensioner says she feels like a prisoner after her rental property was claimed as an “embassy” by a man she says identified himself as a Freemen-on-the-Land, a growing movement of so-called sovereign citizens that is raising concerns with authorities both north and south of the border.

“I am an army of one,” says Rebekah Caverhill at her home in Sylvan Lake, near Red Deer. Tears stream down her face. “I’ve been beat up so badly by people that should be helping that I don’t know where to turn.”

Caverhill rented half a duplex she owns in Calgary’s upscale Parkdale neighbourhood to a new tenant in November 2011 on the recommendation of a friend.

The renter, Andreas Pirelli, had recently moved to Calgary from Montreal and was a self-described handyman. She says he agreed to “spruce up” the property in return for three months of free rent. What she thought was a good deal soon turned into a nightmare.

A few months after Pirelli moved in, Caverhill went to inspect the work and she says she found the entire kitchen and bathroom had been gutted. All the doors inside had been removed and the floor of the master bedroom had been painted black, she says 

But Caverhill quickly learned she had much bigger problems.

“He walks me to the door and he’s yelling at me, ’I’m a Freemen-on-the-Land,”’ Caverhill says.

“I said: ’This is my house, not yours.’ He said: ’No. This is an embassy house now and it’s mine and you have no rights’, so then he slams the door.” (Photo: Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press)

‘It had been completely consumed’: Grizzly bear eats black bear in BanffA large male grizzly bear is showing everyone who’s boss in Alberta’s mountain parks.Earlier this month, officials closed the Sundance Canyon area in Banff National Park after a group of hikers came upon a bear known as No. 122 feeding on a carcass. They reopened the trail late Tuesday after he moved on.During the investigation into the incident, officials determined the carcass was a small black bear. It’s believed it was a predatory attack on the black bear. (Photo: Dan Ralfa, Parks Canada / Calgary Herald)

‘It had been completely consumed’: Grizzly bear eats black bear in Banff
A large male grizzly bear is showing everyone who’s boss in Alberta’s mountain parks.

Earlier this month, officials closed the Sundance Canyon area in Banff National Park after a group of hikers came upon a bear known as No. 122 feeding on a carcass. They reopened the trail late Tuesday after he moved on.

During the investigation into the incident, officials determined the carcass was a small black bear. It’s believed it was a predatory attack on the black bear. (Photo: Dan Ralfa, Parks Canada / Calgary Herald)

How the ‘pristine darkness’ above a national park the size of Switzerland became the largest dark sky in the worldThe sky above Wood Buffalo National Park in Northern Alberta recently became the largest dark sky in the world. In a series of questions and answers, the National Post‘s Jake Edmiston attempts to find out what that means and why we should care.Q Wait a second. Did the sky at Wood Buffalo just get darker?A No, it has presumably been that way since the dawn of time. But the park — straddling the border between Alberta and the Northwest Territories — just became the latest to receive a “dark-sky preserve” designation from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.Q So what?A Regulations are now in effect on the amount of artificial lighting allowed inside or near the reserve, which will prevent future developments from threatening the “pristine” darkness, says Robert Dick, who manages the dark-sky preserve program. These preserves act as havens for both stargazers and nocturnal animals, whose hunting and mating habits are easily interrupted by the light pollution posed by even small human settlements. (Photo: Parks Canada / CNW Group).

How the ‘pristine darkness’ above a national park the size of Switzerland became the largest dark sky in the world
The sky above Wood Buffalo National Park in Northern Alberta recently became the largest dark sky in the world. In a series of questions and answers, the National Post‘s Jake Edmiston attempts to find out what that means and why we should care.

Q Wait a second. Did the sky at Wood Buffalo just get darker?
A No, it has presumably been that way since the dawn of time. But the park — straddling the border between Alberta and the Northwest Territories — just became the latest to receive a “dark-sky preserve” designation from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.

Q So what?
A Regulations are now in effect on the amount of artificial lighting allowed inside or near the reserve, which will prevent future developments from threatening the “pristine” darkness, says Robert Dick, who manages the dark-sky preserve program. These preserves act as havens for both stargazers and nocturnal animals, whose hunting and mating habits are easily interrupted by the light pollution posed by even small human settlements. (Photo: Parks Canada / CNW Group).

Alberta grizzly bears’ ‘stripper’ dancing caught on video, million-plus views on YouTube leads to ‘Colbert Report’An Internet video is teaching hundreds of thousands of people around the world that back-scratching is one of the bear necessities for grizzlies in the foothills of Alberta.Taken over a three-day period and posted to YouTube by Alberta Parks conservation officer in late July, the flick, titled “What goes on when you are not there,” shows a variety of wildlife captured by motion-sensor cameras as they visit what’s known as a “communications” or “rub” tree.As of Tuesday, the video had more than 1,462,000 views and had been featured on “Good Morning America” and the “ABC Nightly News” and even the “Colbert Report.”There are several different animals in the video, but the grizzlies are the stars, rubbing up against the tree, at one point, four at a time. Set to folksy music, they appear to be dancing. (YouTube)

Alberta grizzly bears’ ‘stripper’ dancing caught on video, million-plus views on YouTube leads to ‘Colbert Report’
An Internet video is teaching hundreds of thousands of people around the world that back-scratching is one of the bear necessities for grizzlies in the foothills of Alberta.

Taken over a three-day period and posted to YouTube by Alberta Parks conservation officer in late July, the flick, titled “What goes on when you are not there,” shows a variety of wildlife captured by motion-sensor cameras as they visit what’s known as a “communications” or “rub” tree.

As of Tuesday, the video had more than 1,462,000 views and had been featured on “Good Morning America” and the “ABC Nightly News” and even the “Colbert Report.”

There are several different animals in the video, but the grizzlies are the stars, rubbing up against the tree, at one point, four at a time. Set to folksy music, they appear to be dancing. (YouTube)

Tagged with:  #animals  #grizzly bear  #bears  #Alberta  #Canada
‘The whole town was feeling hope’: Flooding in Canmore couldn’t keep couple from saying ‘I do’As flood waters rose in the streets of Canmore last week, Christine Bierman and her fiancé Mickey Cimolai feared their wedding would be a total bust.By Thursday, the southern Alberta mountain town was in a state of emergency. Evacuation orders were issued. Forecasts warned one hundred millimetres of rain would fall.“Friday she called me and said ‘I’m going to have to call it off,’” said Crista Lee Mitchell, a local photographer who had been working with the Calgary couple for almost a year planning the big day.But with a little creative thinking and the help of a community facing the worst flood in recent history, they managed to say ‘I do’ on Saturday — the photo of the newlyweds kissing in the back of a white pickup truck serving as an unwitting symbol of the resilience, love and hope Albertans have displayed during the floods. (Photo: Courtesy of Crista Lee Mitchell)

‘The whole town was feeling hope’: Flooding in Canmore couldn’t keep couple from saying ‘I do’
As flood waters rose in the streets of Canmore last week, Christine Bierman and her fiancé Mickey Cimolai feared their wedding would be a total bust.

By Thursday, the southern Alberta mountain town was in a state of emergency. Evacuation orders were issued. Forecasts warned one hundred millimetres of rain would fall.

“Friday she called me and said ‘I’m going to have to call it off,’” said Crista Lee Mitchell, a local photographer who had been working with the Calgary couple for almost a year planning the big day.

But with a little creative thinking and the help of a community facing the worst flood in recent history, they managed to say ‘I do’ on Saturday — the photo of the newlyweds kissing in the back of a white pickup truck serving as an unwitting symbol of the resilience, love and hope Albertans have displayed during the floods. (Photo: Courtesy of Crista Lee Mitchell)

Flooding under control — for now: Second surge feared as Calgary becomes watery ghost town
Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi says water levels on the Elbow River, one of two rivers that flow through the southern Alberta city, has crested. “We have peaked and we have seen a slow decrease,” Nenshi told a news conference Friday morning.

“That doesn’t mean there won’t be another peak as surge waters come, but it does mean today, at this moment, we’re slowly seeing the numbers go down.” (Photos: National Post; Calgary Herald; Canadian Press)

LIVE: Elbow and Bow rivers peak, entire Calgary neighbourhoods cleared

Photos capture dramatic moment man and his cat swim to safety after being swamped by Calgary flood

We were trapped’: Semi-trucks stranded on southern Alberta highway as floodwaters advanced

nationalpostphotos:

Heavy rains in southern Alberta may force up to 100,000 Calgary residents to evacuate
Torrential rains and widespread flooding throughout southern Alberta on Thursday washed out roads and bridges, sent residents scurrying for safety, and delivered up surreal scenes of cars, couches and refrigerators just floating away.

Officials with the City of Calgary said as many as 100,000 people could be forced from their homes due to heavy flooding, an evacuation that would take place in stages over the next few days.

The Bow River Basin was battered late Wednesday and into Thursday with up to 100 mm of rain, bringing river levels to the breaking point. Parts of Calgary along the Bow and Elbow rivers remained in the crosshairs with residents in six low-lying areas out of their homes. Photos: (Postmedia; Calgary Herald, Canadian Press)

Alberta couple’s backyard dig reveals evidence that meteorite may have killed mammothsAn Alberta couple’s archeological retirement project at their lakeside cottage southwest of Edmonton has produced artifacts that are now at the centre of one of science’s most controversial debates: whether a massive comet or meteorite struck a glacier-encased Hudson Bay about 13,000 years ago, wiped out the mammoths and other Ice Age “megafauna” and destroyed the Clovis culture that represented the first major wave of human migration in the New World.The hotly disputed theory was recently challenged by a 16-member research team from the United States, Britain and Belgium, which published a major study in February concluding that the odds of a four-kilometre-wide comet exploding across the Laurentide Ice Sheet that covered ancient Canada “are infinitesimal” given the lack of clear evidence, such as layers of so-called “shocked” rocks and minerals transformed by an Earth-shaking mega-blast.

Alberta couple’s backyard dig reveals evidence that meteorite may have killed mammoths
An Alberta couple’s archeological retirement project at their lakeside cottage southwest of Edmonton has produced artifacts that are now at the centre of one of science’s most controversial debates: whether a massive comet or meteorite struck a glacier-encased Hudson Bay about 13,000 years ago, wiped out the mammoths and other Ice Age “megafauna” and destroyed the Clovis culture that represented the first major wave of human migration in the New World.

The hotly disputed theory was recently challenged by a 16-member research team from the United States, Britain and Belgium, which published a major study in February concluding that the odds of a four-kilometre-wide comet exploding across the Laurentide Ice Sheet that covered ancient Canada “are infinitesimal” given the lack of clear evidence, such as layers of so-called “shocked” rocks and minerals transformed by an Earth-shaking mega-blast.

Alberta man may be first to sell house for bitcoin virtual currencyLike countless young men across North America, Taylor More likes sports and hanging out with friends. And if his latest project pans out he’ll be unique — the first person to sell a house for bitcoins.Mr. More’s two-bedroom bungalow “with beautiful mountain views” is priced at the equivalent of $405,000 in bitcoins.A so-called crypto-currency that exists only electronically, bitcoin was created in 2009 and has grown in popularity, the darling of digital enthusiasts and, increasingly, doubtful types who value the anonymity and ease of doing business it provides.

Alberta man may be first to sell house for bitcoin virtual currency
Like countless young men across North America, Taylor More likes sports and hanging out with friends. And if his latest project pans out he’ll be unique — the first person to sell a house for bitcoins.

Mr. More’s two-bedroom bungalow “with beautiful mountain views” is priced at the equivalent of $405,000 in bitcoins.

A so-called crypto-currency that exists only electronically, bitcoin was created in 2009 and has grown in popularity, the darling of digital enthusiasts and, increasingly, doubtful types who value the anonymity and ease of doing business it provides.